Conference Program

400+ EXPERT AIRPORT & AIRLINE INDUSTRY SPEAKERS! Join us in person at this year’s conference!

The conference addresses airport and airline business-critical issues and solutions, providing innovative ideas and progressive thinking for future development, and proven measures for maintaining passenger custom and satisfaction – all key to the industry’s future success.

Conference Program SEARCH FUNCTION now available! Search for words or phrases to find all the presentations and panel discussions that you will be interested in.


Advanced air mobility and vertiport development

Day 1: Wednesday, June 15

Advanced air mobility and vertiport development
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Paolo Bianchi
Head of infrastructure strategy and planning
Bologna Airport
Italy
Velissarios Eleftheriou
Vertiport operations manager
Volocopter
Germany

09:05

The electric aviation era

Robin Riedel
Partner
McKinsey and Company
USA
This presentation will discuss the challenges and opportunities for the aviation industry.

09:25

NASA’s vision for advanced air mobility (AAM)

Huy Tran
Director of aeronautics
NASA
USA
NASA vision for Advanced Air Mobility is to create a collaborative ecosystem where industries, government agencies and academia to exchange ideas and technologies to enable growth in this new market sector. NASA goal is to provide research findings and systems requirement for safe integration of AAM vehicles into the current airspace with services-oriented architecture toward the future data-driven air traffic management systems.

What the audience will learn

  • Airspace management – extensible UAS Traffic Management Framework to UAM
  • Automation and contingency management
  • High density Vertiport and verti-plex operations
  • Field testing to validate systems architecture and technologies for AAM applications with partners participation

09:45

Vertiports design specifications and regulations perspective

Predrag Sekulic
Aerodromes expert
European Union Aviation Safety Agency, EASA
Germany
Vertiports constitute one of the fundamental elements of the overall UAM system and play an important role for the successful implementation of the new transportation concept. Their integration in existing aerodrome infrastructures or in the city landscape requires a thorough analysis of requirements for the safe operations. The presentation explores the approach taken for the development of the early design specifications for vertiports and presents the expected challenges for the implementation of the future regulations. The foreseen future steps of the European regulatory framework developments for vertiports will be also presented.

What the audience will learn

  • Why prototype technical specifications and not the rules?
  • Why vertiports requirements in two steps?
  • What future rules will cover or foresee?
  • Vertiports in the scope of Basic Regulation (EU Regulation 1139/2018), what does it means?

10:05

The Italian national strategic plan for advanced air mobility

Carmela Tripaldi
Research and development - new technologies and aerospace
ENAC CAA-IT
Italy
Davide Drago
Engineer/director of airports department
ENAC - Italian Civil Aviation Authority
Italy
The big Italian challenge is to create a national ecosystem for the development of advanced air mobility services into 2030. We have established a comprehensive strategy, and designed a road map including specific activities for each gap to be solved. The implementation of the activities will allow us to increase the level of maturity of the Italian ecosystem of advanced air mobility.

What the audience will learn

  • The Italian AAM holistic approach
  • Target applications and gaps to unlock the system
  • The main clusters of activities for development of AAM services

10:25 - 10:45

Q&A + Discussion

Huy Tran
Director of aeronautics
NASA
USA
Robin Riedel
Partner
McKinsey and Company
USA
Carmela Tripaldi
Research and development - new technologies and aerospace
ENAC CAA-IT
Italy
Predrag Sekulic
Aerodromes expert
European Union Aviation Safety Agency, EASA
Germany

10:45 - 11:05

Break

11:05

Advance air mobility demand modeling – who is switching modes?

Darrell Swanson
Director
Swanson Aviation Consultancy Ltd
UK
AAM is likely to happen closer to passengers' origins/destinations, which means that it will occur at dedicated vertiports or at smaller regional and general aviation airports. The challenge that future operators, airports, local authorities and manufacturers will have is determining who are these passengers are and why they will switch to AAM. In this presentation, Swanson Aviation Consultancy sets out its method for identifying passengers who will shift to AAM and provides an example of a specific UK route for consideration. The presentation will also discuss the implication that this will have on ground infrastructure requirements including vertiport sizing and power requirements to enable electric aircraft operations.

What the audience will learn

  • How electric aircraft will lead to a future of distributed aviation
  • Why smaller airfields and airports closer to passenger origin/destinations will benefit from advanced air mobility
  • How to approach demand modeling for AAM where there is no history of aviation services
  • How this approach to demand modeling will help identify routes not previously explored by airports and airlines

11:25

Local communities and UAM: nurturing societal acceptance through co-creation

Dr Vassilis Agouridas
Head of EU public co-creation and ecosystem outreach
AIRBUS Urban Mobility
Germany
The emerging UAM/AAM ecosystem has been driven predominately by cross-industry technological advances and convergence. Societal acceptance is figuring nowadays as a major, if not the most dominant, challenge in the realisation of UAM services and their associated business cases, and thus, of market triggering and uptake. This presentation will discuss societal viewpoints with an emphasis on the emerging role of local authorities and their catalysing participation in co-creating sustainable and responsible integrated mobility services including UAM/AAM modal options.

What the audience will learn

  • A wider ecosystem consideration of UAM/AAM
  • The societal challenges associated with UAM/AAM
  • The emerging and catalysing role of local authorities for nurturing societal acceptance

11:45

The inner urban vertiport

Jörn Jaeger
Head of airspace and vertiports
Volocopter GmbH
Germany
Placing and operating take-off and landing sites in dense urban environments (vertiports) creates several challenges and needs a thorough understanding of the aircraft concept of operations. Volocopter conducted a project to design a fully functional vertiport with the smallest footprint possible. This presentation provides insight into the project results by giving an overview of vertiport requirements, constraints and solutions.

What the audience will learn

  • essential design criteria and requirements for an inner urban vertiport
  • If you don’t know the aircraft you cannot design a vertiport
  • what the passenger journey will look like
  • how the same vertiport can fit different locations and target groups
  • how long it takes to implement a vertiport

12:05

Next-generation air mobility business development in airline

Masato Kunezaki
Director, air mobility business creation department
Japan Airlines Ltd
Japan
The social implementation of the eVTOL air taxi service in Japan is aimed at the timing of Osaka-Kansai Expo 2025. In this presentation, the activities relating to new business development in airline will be explained, in addition to the business scenario tasks to be solved, the roadmap for UAV and the commercialization of the air taxi business, keeping airline in mind.

What the audience will learn

  • An example of new business development strategies by airline
  • An example of the UAV logistics business scenario in Japan
  • An example of the air taxi business scenario in Japan
  • Tasks to be solved for air taxi business commercialization in Japan
  • The roadmap for air taxi business commercialization in Japan

12:25 - 12:45

Q&A + Discussion

Darrell Swanson
Director
Swanson Aviation Consultancy Ltd
UK
Jörn Jaeger
Head of airspace and vertiports
Volocopter GmbH
Germany
Masato Kunezaki
Director, air mobility business creation department
Japan Airlines Ltd
Japan
Dr Vassilis Agouridas
Head of EU public co-creation and ecosystem outreach
AIRBUS Urban Mobility
Germany

12:45 - 14:00

Lunch

14:00

Vertiports in an urban infrastructure environment

Julian Carlson
Director
Pascall+Watson
UK
As populations the world over progressively urbanise, the need for fast, efficient alternative forms of transport, particularly within the city context, will come to the fore. The high passenger turnover and variable capacity of eVTOL requires specialised facilities and modes of operation not observed in the commercial aviation community. This presentation explores; some of the challenges presented in supporting vertiport infrastructure, how to successfully integrate them into the urban fabric of our cities and ultimately the social acceptance of this yet unrealised third dimension of point to point travel opportunities.

What the audience will learn

  • How vertiports can fit with other transportation infrastructure
  • What some of the technical challenges required to support vertiport infrastructure are
  • Why urban fabric integration is key to understanding how vertiports will be accepted

14:20

Successfully siting, designing, building and operating vertiports now to ensure our future

Kevin Cox
Chief executive officer
Ferrovial Vertiports
USA
For decades, humans have flocked to cities and urban areas creating congestion and pushing transportation infrastructure to the limit. In a race not seen since the days of the Wright Brothers, innovative companies are rapidly designing, developing, and seeking certification of vertical take-off and landing aircraft that will forever change urban transportation, utilizing technology that will ensure passengers are transported in a safe, quiet, and sustainable way. The success of this nascent industry is, however, highly dependent upon the proper siting, development, construction, and operation of a series of agnostic vertiport networks, seamlessly integrated into the fabric of their surroundings.

What the audience will learn

  • Why proper siting of vertiports is highly dependent upon the business model, the expected demand, and solving for the first and last mile
  • With vertiports being developed from a “blank sheet of paper,” why it is important to utilize lessons learned from commercial aviation and what lessons may need to be “unlearned”
  • For a vertiport network to be resilient and successful, why it must be agnostic to aircraft type, the aircraft mission, the business model, and its operator
  • Why federal, state, regional and local officials should embrace this new and sustainable form of transportation and not seek to over regulate it
  • How and why vertiports can and should be “future-proofed”

14:40

Urban-Air Port: A new era in aviation demands new infrastructure

Adrian Zanelli
Chief financial officer
Urban-Air Port
UK

15:00

Unlocking the sky for advanced air mobility (AAM)

Duncan Walker
Chief executive officer
Skyports
UK
This presentation considers the need for rapid delivery of vertiport infrastructure for passenger-carrying electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) aircraft to enable the AAM to grow and scale; the likely trade-offs between design and functionality of vertiports for the purposes of cost-effectiveness and deliverability; the importance of testing critical vertiport and eVTOL technologies, safety/security procedures and passenger processing. It draws on experiences of delivering vertiports and plans to develop and integrate Europe’s first test eVTOL vertiport in France within an existing airport to provide a commercial air taxi service in time for the 2024 Paris Olympics.

What the audience will learn

  • The deployment of fully functional vertiports quickly and at scale to enable commercial air services
  • How to meet the highest regulated safety standards for vertiport design and operations while still providing a pleasant passenger experience
  • How to integrate vertiports into existing aerodromes/airports to complement existing aviation services
  • The regulatory challenges related to advanced aerial mobility infrastructure and how to overcome them
  • The benefits of providing vertiports at airports (airside and/or landside) as part of the passenger and onward transportation offering

15:20 - 15:40

Q&A + Discussion

Adrian Zanelli
Chief financial officer
Urban-Air Port
UK
Kevin Cox
Chief executive officer
Ferrovial Vertiports
USA
Duncan Walker
Chief executive officer
Skyports
UK
Julian Carlson
Director
Pascall+Watson
UK

15:40 - 15:55

Break

15:55

Vertiports: what can we learn from our progress so far?

Elisabeth Bernitt
Senior vice president
AECOM Technical Services Inc
USA
Suzanne Murtha
Vice president, global lead for connected and automated technologies
AECOM
USA
AECOM is currently supporting the global deployment of eVTOLs and working with Ferrovial and Lilium to design a network of vertiports connecting strategic locations in major Florida cities. With many global regions likely to see the deployment of eVTOL in the coming years, what will this mean for airports and other modes of air travel? Drawing on AECOM's eVTOL experience, this presentation looks at what airports are currently doing to support eVTOL deployment and will discuss the design, policy and airport operations considerations required for airports to develop vertiport infrastructure.

What the audience will learn

  • What airports are currently doing to support eVTOL deployments
  • How design for eVTOL and routing could impact airport operations
  • About the policies that will support eVTOL deployments
  • The lessons learned from the progress the industry has made so far

16:15

Air mobility integration at airports

Marco Pellegrino
Head of airside operations and first aid, Aeroporti di Roma
Urban Blue (representative)
Italy
The big challenge of advanced air mobility integration with legacy airport operations is finding new solutions for new mobility businesses. The goal is to guarantee safety, security and seamless operations for customers. Smooth, quick and sustainable operations maintain high standards of safety and security, without interfering with airport operations. Achieving this goal is crucial for engaging a higher number of stakeholders than in the past.

What the audience will learn

  • SWAT analysis of air mobility in the airport environment
  • Overview of the new stakeholder network for enabling a deeper connection of the airport with the urban and regional area
  • New scenario of the interaction between ATM and UTM in the terminal area
  • New technological solutions to garantee safety and security

16:35

The advanced air mobility program at Munich Airport

Oliver Schultes
Senior consultant and project manager
Munich Airport International GmbH
Germany
Urban Air Mobility stands for a new, innovative way of transporting passengers and goods. The development of such transport solutions has long since ceased to be a vision. As a future mobility concept, it has the potential to directly connect urban regions, create new business ideas and improve the overall travel experience. The advanced air mobility program at Munich Airport focuses on the seamless integration of these new means of transport – particularly for passengers – into the existing airport environment. The presentation will provide insights into Munich Airport’s advanced air mobility program, including associated challenges and solutions for a successful vertiport integration at airports.

What the audience will learn

  • Get to know how Munich Airport is approaching the UAM use case of air taxi
  • Gather information about the specific challenges of and solutions for integrating a vertiport in an airport environment
  • Get to know Munich Airports Air Mobility services and solutions

16:55

Urban air mobility: fast-forwarding to Paris 2024 Olympic Games

Joyce Abou Moussa
Urban air mobility strategy, development and partnerships lead
Groupe ADP
France
Alban Negret
Head of innovation and corporate venture
Groupe ADP
France
While advanced air mobility (AAM) vehicle technology is advancing very rapidly, a number of challenges raised by this new form of mobility in terms of use, acceptability, regulations, technologies and industrialization are still to be addressed. In order to respond to these challenges, and better prepare for a pre-commercial showcase at the Paris 2024 Olympic Games, Groupe ADP and RATP Group launched the testing phase of the AAM Pontoise Airfield Sandbox in November 2021, to drive maturity forward.

What the audience will learn

  • Vertiports in airport context
  • Pontoise Airfield Sandbox
  • AAM challenges
  • 2024 Paris Olympics and objectives

17:15 - 17:35

Q&A + Discussion

Joyce Abou Moussa
Urban air mobility strategy, development and partnerships lead
Groupe ADP
France
Marco Pellegrino
Head of airside operations and first aid, Aeroporti di Roma
Urban Blue (representative)
Italy
Oliver Schultes
Senior consultant and project manager
Munich Airport International GmbH
Germany
Suzanne Murtha
Vice president, global lead for connected and automated technologies
AECOM
USA

Opening Day Party hosted by Groupe ADP. Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Airport design, planning and development

Day 1: Wednesday, June 15

Airport design, planning and development
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Ashwini Thorat
Head of design and planning
Noida International Airport
India
Tim Walder
Senior director and aviation sector leader
Arcadis
UK

09:05 - 09:50

Panel discussion: Noida Airport: leading design and procurement through a pandemic

The need to provide a new airport for Noida, India, was identified in a pre-pandemic world and a competition was launched while industries throughout the world were starting to adapt to a new way of working, with wide-reaching impacts on the aviation industry. This seismic shift placed a significant responsibility on stakeholders and designers alike to undertake a rapid transition of technological, collaborative and behavioral working methods and adapt to a new, efficient workflow, delivering a tender submission in just over a year. The client and design team will reflect on the lessons learned throughout this challenging but enlightening period.

What the audience will learn

  • Adapting to new methods of remote team management, bringing efficiency to procurement through close collaboration
  • Adapting teams to agile working from home – behavioral shifts in remote working methods
  • Flexible resource management – the resilience of joint ventures
  • Leveraging online digital technology platforms and cloud-based tools to collaborate and manage workflows and design
  • Sometimes online is not enough – choosing when to meet face to face
Ashwini Thorat
Head of design and planning
Noida International Airport
India
Jan Michael Wicki
Head program development and coordination
Noida International Airport (by Flughafen Zürich AG)
India
Martin Moe
Associate partner, architect
Nordic Office of Architecture
Norway
Vishwa Mehra
Associate director - aviation India
Jacobs
India
Panel Moderator:
Nicolas Schenk, chief development officer, Noida International Airport (a Zurich Airport International company)

09:50

The future airport and the challenges that lie ahead

Paul Griffiths
CEO
Dubai Airports
United Arab Emirates
As the world’s largest international airport, Dubai Airports rebounded from the global pandemic much faster than many other airports and were able to insulate ourselves from many of the problems of resource and facility reactivation that have been experienced by other airports around the world. This presentation will cover recovery and rediscovery – challenges and opportunities for the world’s largest intercontinental hub. I will describe dealing with the sudden loss of 89m annual passengers, how this has impacted Dubai’s business model and what opportunities lie ahead to transform airport design, operation and the passenger experience.

What the audience will learn

  • Rebounding from the global pandemic
  • How to insulate from problems of resource and facility reactivation
  • Passenger experience

10:15

Bucking the trend: expanding Iceland's aviation offer during Covid-19

Guðmundur Daði Rúnarsson
Chief commercial and airport development officer
Isavia
Iceland
Carl Dainter
Head of aviation
Mace
UK
The expansion of Iceland's aviation offer has kicked off against the backdrop of Covid-19, which has caused the greatest disruption to air travel in history. However, with numbers of visitors to Iceland on the rise after the lifting of travel restrictions, Isavia's decade-long program to bring additional passenger and aircraft capacity to Keflavik Airport is quickly building momentum. The global pandemic has given Isavia the opportunity to consider how program and environmental efficiencies can be enhanced through the application of the operational readiness activation and transition methodology and organizational effectiveness, resulting in the right decisions made, at the right time.

What the audience will learn

  • How to combine ORAT methodology with design and with user experience in mind
  • How teams better integrate through the application of organizational effectiveness
  • Driving a program during a pandemic with recovery and sustainability in mind
  • Operating an airport during a pandemic, with expansion plans underway
  • How to think outside of the construction box to facilitate existing customer experience whilst undergoing airport expansion

10:40

Airport development in the post-Covid era: design for the unknown

Teresa Talavera
Landside coordination project manager
LIMA AIRPORT PARTNERS
Peru
Eduardo Coll Hernandez
Managing partner
Leadin Aviation Consulting
Spain
After almost 20 years of aeronautical traffic growth in the region, Lima airport was ready to design and build its new terminal in 2020. When the Covid-19 pandemic hit the market and changed the industry with unclear traffic forecasts, airlines shutting down operations and many uncertain changes, this encouraged the Lima Airport PMO team to transform all these challenges into multiple opportunities thanks to a design that implements innovative concepts to target a modular, scalable and efficient design that optimizes the infrastructure to adapt it for industry challenges and uncertain traffic.

What the audience will learn

  • How to design and build aeronautical projects in challenging environments
  • Adaptable infrastructure for uncertain contexts
  • Innovative decision making as a PMO team

11:05 - 11:25

Break

11:25

Creating a human-centered, passenger-focused airport reflecting the region it serves

Tom Woodrow
SVP of engineering & intelligent infrastructure
Allegheny County Airport Authority
USA
Pittsburgh International Airport (PIT) engaged world-class teams to incorporate the region’s best assets into the design and construction of a new terminal and multimodal complex opening in 2025. By collaborating with local vendors, trades, small businesses, DBEs, and airlines we are creating a facility built by Pittsburgh for Pittsburgh. When Covid-19 halted construction, PIT held a series of pandemic workshops with healthcare and industry experts resulting in features ensuring the highest standards in public health and safety and outdoor spaces for passengers and workers alike. The project will be powered by a unique microgrid driving resilience, sustainability and efficiency.

What the audience will learn

  • How designs based on local assets are essential to developing a unique sense of place at PIT
  • How this airport is for Pittsburgh, by Pittsburgh: More than 80 percent of the work and materials are local
  • How PIT’s transforming from a hub airport to one that puts O&D passengers first, improving customer experience and efficiency
  • Diversity, equity, and inclusion are core principles, driven into every action and decision within PIT’s terminal modernization program
  • PIT green: LEED Silver and a microgrid that provides 100% of the power needed to operate the airport

11:50

Design and construction of Delta's new terminal at LaGuardia Airport

Ryan Marzullo
Managing director, New York design and construction
Delta Air Lines
USA
In July 2015 Delta Air Lines, in partnership with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, announced the complete reconstruction of its two legacy terminals at LaGuardia Airport as part of the Port Authority's LGA modernization initiative. Costing $4bn and initially planned for ten years of construction, Delta broke ground in 2017 on one of the most complex construction programs at one of the United States' busiest and most congested airports. This presentation will open the door on the majority of Delta's reconfigured, modernized and state-of-the-art new terminal at the premier business airport in New York City.

What the audience will learn

  • The design and functionality of Delta's new terminal at LaGuardia
  • How the construction of the new terminal was phased around a very busy and constrained operation
  • How Delta was able to accelerate construction during the pandemic and shorten the construction schedule by nearly two years

12:15

London Gatwick’s future plans

Cédric Laurier
Chief technical officer
Gatwick Airport Ltd
UK
Gatwick Airport is committed to exploring how to grow sustainably while supporting the local and national economy, improving facilities and continuing to transform services for its passengers. The presentation will discuss what the future holds for London’s second-largest airport and how we will deliver our Northern Runway plans.

What the audience will learn

  • Gatwick’s plan for the future
  • Northern Runway project
  • Sustainable growth
  • Innovation

12:40

Reimagining O'Hare for the 21st century

Robert Hoxie
Managing deputy commissioner/chief development officer
City of Chicago Department of Aviation
USA
Dominic Garascia
Assistant commissioner - design and GIS
City of Chicago Department of Aviation
USA
Having nearly completed a US $10bn airfield realignment program including four new runways and two reconstructed and lengthened runways in the midst of the world's busiest airfield, Chicago O'Hare is now focused on the US $8.5bn terminal area development program (TAP). The TAP program will replace Terminal 2 and integrate existing Terminals 1 and 3 into a facility housing two major airline alliances. This presentation will focus on the overall strategic direction for the airport, the current terminal works in progress and the future development plans.

What the audience will learn

  • The effort and complexity to reconfigure the worlds busiest airfield
  • The redevelopment plan for configuring the terminal complexes to support airline alliance operations
  • The Terminal 5 development status
  • Future terminals design update
  • Collateral development plans for non-aeronautical facilities

13:05 - 14:15

Lunch

14:15

Creating a signature expansion at Helsinki Airport

Timo Järvelä
Vice president, passenger experience and processes
Finavia
Finland
Juho Grönholm
Architect SAFA, Partner
ALA Architects
Finland
The latest expansion of the airport opened to the public in December 2021. The project that started with a design competition launched in 2016 has been built according to BREEAM Excellent standards as one of the country's first alliance projects. The expansion greatly improves the functionality and simplifies the passenger routes at the airport: practically there is now only one terminal. The new entrance building with its warm wooden surfaces creates a strong local identity to the airport. The airport development program aims to serve 30 million customers by year 2030.

What the audience will learn

  • Strategy for having everything under one roof
  • Improving passenger experience and accessibility
  • Strengthening the airport's local identity through design
  • Experiences in sustainable construction

14:40

Getting more out of less

Mookie Patel
Chief business and finance officer
Austin-Bergstrom International Airport
USA
Tim Hudson
Principal
Gensler
USA
Today’s commercial service airports are experiencing unprecedented growth and passenger activity levels that exceed those levels seen before the global pandemic. Airport real estate comes at a premium cost, if it is available at all. Austin-Bergstrom International Airport is modifying and renovating its existing facilities to address increased passenger levels while providing an authentic Austin experience within the existing terminal footprint. This panel will share lessons learned during these challenging times, with a focus on how impacts on ongoing operations and passenger experience will be addressed through design while resolving facility capacity and operational challenges.

What the audience will learn

  • How to create additional operational area without expanding the building
  • How to manage complex terminal renovation projects in an active environment
  • How to develop a phasing plan to maintain terminal operations

15:05

Development of the new Bucharest Brancusi South Airport

Caspar Baum
Director aviation
Surbana Jurong Group, Singapore
Singapore
Bucharest, the capital of Romania, will receive a modern and fully privately owned international airport in the next few years. This airport will be futureproof and be based on the innovative requirements of airlines and airport stakeholders for the upcoming decades. The airport will be part of a new urban development, which will generate opportunities for businesses, employment and social infrastructure.

What the audience will learn

  • Futureproof airport development and innovation
  • Sustainable business plan and green initiatives
  • Integration of stakeholders and the entire airport community
  • Transformation and regeneration of an entire metropolitan area
  • Attraction of technology and innovative systems

15:30 - 15:45

Break

15:45

Kutaisi International Airport: a versatile user-oriented business model

Tamara Archuadze
Director
United Airports of Georgia LLC
Georgia
Frans van Vuure
Director / senior architect
UNStudio
Netherlands
Voted one of the 14 most beautiful airports in the world by Curbed in 2018, Kutaisi International Airport has rapidly grown from 300,000 passengers in 2015 to 2.5m passengers forecasted in 2022. United Airports of Georgia chose to create the recent large extension on the same values as the original design, focusing on the comfort of traveling, being a smart and versatile processor and creating a cultural destination. Emphasizing Georgian hospitality, the airport is much more than a gate to the country. The guest is central in every aspect of the airport’s experience, creating a different terminal experience.

What the audience will learn

  • A user-oriented experience where the health and comfort of every passenger is accommodated through architecture and spatial design
  • Adaptive space that can change over time but which will define the quality of the terminal
  • Consistent sustainable core values create a strong identity for the airport as well as the city

16:10

Western Sydney Airport – a new gateway to Australia

Cristiano Ceccato
Director
Zaha Hadid Architects
UK
Prof David Holm
Architect director
Cox Architecture
Australia
Western Sydney Airport (WSA) is a new greenfield airport in Badgerys Creek in the western district of Sydney. WSA is the only new airport to be constructed in Australia for over a generation and is the largest federal government project under development today. This presentation will showcase how WSA was developed from its inception through to the selection process for the master architect. The audience will learn about the airport's phased growth, and how the design for the terminal is built on sustainable planning principles and modular architecture to create an unmistakable new national gateway to Australia. ZHA and COX were appointed as master architect in late October 2019.

What the audience will learn

  • Airport planning
  • Passenger terminal design
  • Sustainable design
  • Phased development
  • Modular expansion

16:35 - 17:25

Panel discussion: Embracing sense of place within the terminal environment and wayfinding strategies

Airports are symbols of the places they serve. For Ontario International Airport (ONT), it was important to balance the identity of the region and the brand of the airport with the expectations of the terminal experience to differentiate itself from other airports in the region. By integrating sense of place, ONT was able to create an airport ecosystem, from entry to terminal, that doubles as a strategic branding mechanism and a memorable experience reflective of the Inland Empire. This panel will explore how ONT accomplished this from the perspective of executive leadership, planning and customer experience.

What the audience will learn

  • Defining sense of place and its importance to the overall passenger experience in a terminal and campus environment
  • Examples of how this process was applied at Ontario International Airport, including lessons learned for other applications
  • An overview of how to apply sense of place across the journey from airport entry signage to terminal wayfinding
  • Process development and the tools utilized to create a human-centered design response
Atif Elkadi
Chief executive officer
Ontario International Airport
USA
Eren Cello
Director of marketing and communications
Ontario International Airport
USA
Michelle Brantley
Chief planning officer
Ontario International Airport
USA
Tiffany Sanders
Director of customer experience
Ontario International Airport
USA
Panel Moderators:
Scott Gorenc, studio design director, Corgan
Jonathan Massey, aviation sector leader - managing principal, Corgan
Jonathan Massey, Managing Principal, Corgan

Opening Day Party hosted by Groupe ADP. Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Aviation security, border control and facilitation

Day 1: Wednesday, June 15

Aviation security, border control and facilitation
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Art Kosatka
CEO
TranSecure
USA
Dr Jean Salomon
Principal
JSCP Consulting Partners
France
Neville Hay
Director of training
Interportpolice
UK
Philipp Kriegbaum
Retired senior aviation security expert
Philipp Kriegbaum
Germany

09:05

Aviation security spotlight

Hany Bakr
SVP aviation and maritime security
MedAire, an International SOS Company
USA
Hany will discuss the current and envisaged global dynamics and conflict zones and their impact on civil aviation, mobility and air travel. Overflying conflict zones and the constant change in the airspace risks and its influence on the aviation sector.

What the audience will learn

  • The progressive challenges affecting the aviation sector and air travel
  • The value and powerful impact of air carrier’s aviation security risk management professionals
  • The great efforts civil aviation is undertaking to re-emerge from the COVID-19 era

09:30 - 10:35

Panel discussion: Current affairs – recovery and restart and right now

Where is aviation today and how can we collaborate for recovery? How will the Russia-Ukraine conflict affect recovery and security? We will look at identifying the challenges and what can be done to overcome them, including the length of recovery, the impact on the security infrastructure and staffing, the development and cost of technology, revised routing and passenger demand. Is regulatory structure created for where the industry is now going or is it time for the industry to take the reins?
Nathalie Herbelles
Senior director, security and facilitation
Airports Council International
Canada
Mark Rodmell
Deputy executive secretary
European Civil Aviation Conference
France
Keith Goll
Deputy assistant administrator
Transportation Security Administration
USA
Hany Bakr
SVP aviation and maritime security
MedAire, an International SOS Company
USA
Ángeles Pozo
European security expert - APCS
IATA
Spain
Panel Moderators:
Neville Hay, director of training, Interportpolice
Jean Salomon, principal, JSCP Consulting Partners

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

Insider threat – our common responsibility

Tarald Johansen
Director safety, security, quality and contingency
Avinor
Norway
Due to global, European and Norwegian threat assessments, Avinor has done some work on insider threat. Based on the threat picture, we made an airport-specific assessment identifying the risk of insider threat at our airports. We have arranged workshops together with the police, the police secret service, national security agency and representatives from all 43 airports. Together, we have identified vulnerabilities and addressed measures to mitigate the risk.

What the audience will learn

  • What is insider threat?
  • Who is the insider?
  • Where could it happen?
  • How to mitigate the risk from insider threat
  • How to secure passengers and employees from insider threat

11:15

TSA confronts the threat of unmanned aircraft systems

Austin Gould
Requirements and capabilities analysis (RCA) assistant administrator
Transportation Security Administration (TSA)
USA
TSA established the Counter-Unmanned Aircraft System (C-UAS) Technology Program to meet the critical requirements for addressing the rapidly expanding global UAS threat. In recent years, UAS technologies have posed an increased threat to the nation’s critical infrastructure. This necessitates improved security technologies to effectively detect, track, identity, and (under controlled situations and authorities) mitigate unauthorized UAS events at critical infrastructure. The C-UAS program ensures TSA is routinely ready to address rapidly evolving and dynamic UAS threats to infrastructure.

What the audience will learn

  • The C-UAS Technology Program continuously updates and disseminates knowledge learned through its testbeds, delivering data to technology developers
  • TSA conducts research, testing and evaluation on UAS at two innovation airports, which will model testing and testbed designs
  • Testbed designs collect data from UAS equipment and analyze it against vendor claims to determine efficacy

11:35

Aviation security cybersecurity – a global effort to be compliant

Eric Vautier
Group CISO
Groupe ADP
France
Cybersecurity applied to aviation security is a joint effort involving airports, manufacturers, test laboratories, regulators, etc. No one can be successful without the others. After detailing the complexities of the topic, Eric will call for action for all stakeholders to reach compliance together.

What the audience will learn

  • The 360° view of the problem
  • How to achieve cybersecurity through compliance
  • The action list for each stakeholder

11:55 - 12:25

Panel discussion: Evolving threats and risk management

The primary objective of the aviation security strategy is to prevent acts of unlawful interference to civil aviation, including passengers, crew, staff, airlines and the airport infrastructure. The panel will discuss current and possible future threats and how technology and working together can mitigate the risks.
Austin Gould
Requirements and capabilities analysis (RCA) assistant administrator
Transportation Security Administration (TSA)
USA
Eric Vautier
Group CISO
Groupe ADP
France
Tarald Johansen
Director safety, security, quality and contingency
Avinor
Norway
Panel Moderators:
Art Kosatka, CEO, TranSecure
Philipp Kriegbaum, retired senior aviation security expert, Philipp Kriegbaum

12:25 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

Project DARTMOUTH - A Pangiam and Google Cloud collaboration

Richard Grime
Head of customer engineering, UKI Public Sector
Google Cloud
UK
Alexis Long
Chief strategy officer
Pangiam
UK
Pangiam, in collaboration with Google Cloud, has announced details of Project DARTMOUTH, a joint initiative to transform airport security operations using advanced computer vision, artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies. The presentation will detail the latest developments and how these technologies can deliver a step change in security operations.

What the audience will learn

  • The latest developments on Project DARTMOUTH
  • How AI/ML technologies can unlock transformative opportunities in security
  • How to get involved in Project DARTMOUTH
  • What airports and security authorities should consider when upgrading checkpoint hardware
  • The importance of open architecture in procurement

14:15 - 15:15

Panel discussion: Open architecture and AI at the checkpoint

Richard Grime
Head of customer engineering, UKI Public Sector
Google Cloud
UK
Matthew Gilkeson
Director, Innovation Task Force
Transportation Security Administration (TSA)
USA
Phil Dykins
Head of aviation security regulation
UK Civil Aviation Authority
UK
Marie Duffy
Head of capital AGS
AGS Airports
UK
Panel Moderator:
Alexis Long, chief strategy officer, Pangiam

15:15 - 15:35

Break

15:35 - 16:25

Panel discussion: Project SATIE: improving the cybersecurity of the baggage handling system

Security of Air Transport Infrastructure of Europe (SATIE) aims to develop an interoperable toolkit that will help improve cyber-physical correlations, forensic investigations and dynamic impact assessment at airports. With a focus on airport baggage handling systems, project consortium members will together explain the approach, testing, simulations and tools used in the SATIE project to validate the efficiency and interoperability between existing systems and enhanced security solutions to ensure more efficient threat prevention, threat and anomaly detection, incident response and impact mitigation of cyber threats against airport baggage handling systems.

What the audience will learn

  • The importance of risk analysis in developing targeted cybersecurity defensives of a baggage handling system
  • Strong supplier/customer collaboration is critical to developing robust security toolkits
  • Cyberattack – it is no longer a question of if; it is a matter of when
  • The advantages of a security operation center (SOC) in monitoring the critical infrastructure of an airport
  • Simulating cyberattacks using a BHS ‘digital twin’ to provide dynamic impact assessment and learnings
Thomas Oudin
Project manager
Airbus CyberSecurity
France
Sven Hrastnik
Head of hardware support
International Zagreb Airport Jsc
Croatia
Filipe Apolinário
Technical leader cybersecurity unit
INOV
Portugal
Éric Hervé
Chief information security officer
Alstef Group
France
Panel Moderator:
Tim Stelkens-Kobsch, aviation security researcher, German Aerospace Center (DLR)

16:25

Leading the UK on SeMS

Adam Spurling
Compliance team manager - SeMS
UK Civil Aviation Authority
UK
The presentation will highlight the growing number of airports in the UK making use of SeMS.

What the audience will learn

  • A background to the UK SeMS framework
  • Why we are encouraging industry to develop a SeMS when, within the UK it is not a regulatory requirement
  • What benefits have been seen within the UK from the implementation of a SeMS
  • How do I see SeMS developing and what is next for the UK CAA

16:45

Security Management System (collaborated efforts)

Asma Yahya Al-Dhakhri
Senior manager security and facilitation
Oman Airports Management Company
Oman
The presentation will focus on the importance of creating SeMS at the airport level to assure compliance to national and international requirements and setting a smooth security operation in collaboration with all stakeholders. I will discuss the oversight system that has to be created to assure compliance levels to the SeMS.

What the audience will learn

  • The importance of having one umbrella under which all stakeholders work
  • Importance of unifying terminologies and concepts
  • Creating a strong oversight system at the airport (ICAO 8 critical elements)
  • Key success factors to run smooth operation with stakeholders engagement

17:05 - 17:30

Panel discussion: Security management systems – what’s the advantage for airports?

The outcome of a security management system is the development of a positive security culture. ICAO introduced GASeP – the Global Aviation Security Plan – with the objective of enhancing the overall effectiveness of aviation security worldwide. The panel will share their experience and the benefits of SeMS programs.
Asma Yahya Al-Dhakhri
Senior manager security and facilitation
Oman Airports Management Company
Oman
Adam Spurling
Compliance team manager - SeMS
UK Civil Aviation Authority
UK
Panel Moderators:
Neville Hay, director of training, Interportpolice
Philipp Kriegbaum, retired senior aviation security expert, Philipp Kriegbaum

Opening Day Party hosted by Groupe ADP. Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Commercial development and retail experience

Day 1: Wednesday, June 15

Commercial development and retail experience
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Jeremy Corfield
Partner
CPI
Australia
Sujata Suri
Vice president strategy and commercial development
Hamad International Airport (MATAR)
Qatar

09:05

Travel retail post-Covid

Fraser Brown
Retail and property director
Heathrow Airport Limited
UK
The presentation will offer a mixture of lessons learned and what we did, plus insight into our thinking about where we go in recovery and where we think we need to get to in the longer term.

What the audience will learn

  • How Heathrow Retail dealt with passenger drop due to Covid.
  • How Heathrow Retail safely continued to trade through covid.
  • How Heathrow Retail is recovering as passengers rise.
  • How Heathrow Retail sees the future.

09:30

Post-covid retail: new strategies for keeping growth

Luigi Battuello
Director non aviation business
SEA Milan Airports
Italy
In a rapidly changing aviation environment featuring resilience and growth of low-cost airlines, airport retail must evolve radically to better meet consumers’ changing habits and keep growing revenues.

What the audience will learn

  • The dominance of low-cost airlines in the post-Covid landscape
  • The retail offer to evolve rapidly to fulfill new demand
  • The new, pivotal role of F&B as to retail mix and passenger experience
  • The enhanced role of convenience stores and new categories
  • Passenger experience and retail entertainment

09:55

Airport retail is dying; duty free is dead?

Susan Gray
Managing director/partner
Concession Planning International
Australia
Airports that fail to adapt their commercial strategy to take full advantage of the changing nature of the traveling consumer are not optimizing their commercial opportunity. Non-aeronautical activities will continue to represent a huge revenue opportunity for airports for the foreseeable future. However, to truly optimize the opportunity, airports must focus on delivering a great customer experience to all customer groups. To do this, they need to remain relevant. Airports that fail to adapt their commercial strategy and programs to the changing nature of the traveling consumers and their needs will see customer satisfaction and commercial revenues decline.

What the audience will learn

  • The future of airport commercial business
  • The importance of staying relevant and flexible in the modern travel retailing environment
  • The changing nature of 'traditional' airport duty free

10:20 - 10:45

Panel discussion: The future of airport retailing in a post-Covid world

Many things have changed, many have stayed the same. Different markets have had different experiences, but all have been impacted by the pandemic. In this panel we explore key learnings from the adapt-on-the-fly necessity that Covid-19 created, and look at which Covid-induced strategies have long-term impact. We also discuss the realities of a post-Covid world – how many of these forecast and observed changes are really about Covid, and how many were inevitable anyway? We consider the new growth drivers for airport retail and how airports can position themselves to optimise value going forward.
Fraser Brown
Retail and property director
Heathrow Airport Limited
UK
Luigi Battuello
Director non aviation business
SEA Milan Airports
Italy
Susan Gray
Managing director/partner
Concession Planning International
Australia
Panel Moderator:
Jeremy Corfield, partner, CPI

10:45 - 11:05

Break

11:05

The new air travel personas

George Karamanos
Managing director
KPI Aviation Marketing Solutions
United Arab Emirates
Part of the collateral damage that Covid-19 has brought upon aviation is that most of its previous market intelligence with regards to passengers has become obsolete. Over the past two years, passenger behavior and desires have changed significantly. Airports are focusing on getting reacquainted with customers who have changed both as a profile and also as a behavior. Since May 2020, KPI has been monitoring the evolving profile of passengers. KPI will present the new air travel personas based on psychographic and behavioral attributes and their impact on the operational and commercial aspects of airports.

What the audience will learn

  • The new passenger personas
  • New passenger habits in the new airport operational normal
  • Passenger expectations with regards to the retail and F&B offer

11:30

The new airport passenger - welcome to the future

Timothy Barnes
Senior director, commercial services
Calgary International Airport
Canada
As airports evolve from shopping malls serving passive consumers into destinations that serve the needs of tomorrow's travelers, innovation will come from technology investment, expansion of experiences and providing unique and memorable options. Millennials and Generation Z will soon be the dominant generations moving through our airports. We need to serve their needs and rethink the entire experience with them in mind.

What the audience will learn

  • How to use technology to serve the new passenger
  • How to apply research to the selection process
  • Why we need to focus on Millennials and Generation Z

11:55

Learning from the hospitality industry to improve the passenger experience

Damien Kobel
Senior lecturer
EHL - Ecole Hôtelière de Lausanne
Switzerland
What can airport operators gain from implementing a greater hospitality mindset? At a time when non-aeronautical revenue is at a standstill, knowing how to develop and enhance the passenger experience could be the key to increasing additional revenue at airports.

What the audience will learn

  • What defines customer experience
  • The impact of customer experience on non-aeronautical revenues
  • What to learn from the hospitality industry
  • Steps to improve customer experience
  • Case study of how healthcare introduced hospitality concepts to improve the patient experience

12:20 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

Addressing multiple strategic objectives with innovation – a regional example

Yassin Saddiki
Commercial manager
Rotterdam The Hague Airport
Netherlands
Airports face many challenges at once, involving many different stakeholders, while they try to maintain long-term strategic goals. Although this is likely true for airports of all sizes, smaller and regional airports may feel a relatively bigger need to balance their operations with financial and economic targets and sustainability goals, creating distinct experiences for passengers while establishing and cultivating a regional support base. Rotterdam The Hague Airport proactively pushes innovation as a comprehensive strategy to address all these various challenges and interests simultaneously. The presentation will include a recent example that will serve to explain and elaborate on RTHA’s philosophy.

What the audience will learn

  • Strategic objectives with innovation
  • How to pursue sustainability goals in combination with commercial revenue
  • To seek the balance between operations and financial and economic targets

14:10

Sustainable, connected and commercial customer experience

Peter Farmer
Director
Chapman Taylor LLP
UK
As consumers wrestled with recycling bins overflowing with online packaging, Covid-19 accelerated the demands of the ‘sustainably active consumer’. Companies are now increasingly willing to change how they behave, taking sustainability far more into account. Our terminal lounges and commercial environments were already on this path and we are now being further challenged to demonstrate how the spaces we design are holistically sustainable, not just from how they are procured and what they stock, but also how we have added to these values, how they can adapt and holistically embody the values of a post- or ‘living with’ Covid-19 world.

What the audience will learn

  • Who the sustainably active consumer is
  • How we can meet the demands of the sustainably active consumer
  • Trends and ideas influencing the design of the passenger journey
  • Some of the challenges facing terminal commercial teams
  • The importance of holistic commercial and operational design

14:35

Making restaurants planet-friendly

Melda Tuna
Marketing and brand manager
BTA Food & Services
Turkey
The presentation will address how the airport restaurant can minimize its impact on the planet. What is the sustainability movement and why is it a trend? How can you be more planet-friendly and improve your carbon footprint? The presentation will encompass the farm-to-table approach: switching to short supply chain logistics; reducing plastic use in disposable and packaging materials; changing your purchasing approach; improving waste management; menu engineering: adding ‘planet-friendly’ menu options; and utilizing chemical-free/‘green’ cleaning products. Taking it to the next level involves raising awareness: making it your mission and educating your team, and creating the customer experience by informing your guests.

What the audience will learn

  • The impact restaurants have on the planet
  • The approaches to take to become greener and more planet-friendly
  • Restaurants can become more planet-friendly via menu engineering and changes in purchasing behavior

15:00

What can airports learn from global best sustainable retail design?

James Berry
Director
Woods Bagot
USA
With the challenges of emerging optimistically from the pandemic and an increasingly competitive airport landscape, retail and hospitality remain key differentiators in defining the guest experience. This case study of the recent, award-winning and innovative retail and mixed-use development in Singapore will explore the key design principles that have inspired customers, and how this compares with current airport retail. Focusing on the guest experience, well-being and wellness, it will examine how sustainability is an essential part of catering for the needs of travelers and how airports can learn from successful city-based retail design.

What the audience will learn

  • A case study of Funan Mall, Singapore – a benchmark in sustainable retail design
  • What is meant by sustainability, well-being and wellness in the context of airport retail
  • How sustainability and biophilia are becoming two of the keys to successful commercial retail design

15:25 - 15:40

Break

15:40

Connecting the dots: technology’s impact on concessions

Kimberly McLean
Manager, customer experience design
San Diego International Airport
USA
Rick Belliotti
Director, customer experience design and innovation
San Diego County Regional Airport Authority
USA
Going beyond traditional journey maps, SAN is implementing technology that maps and supports passenger movement through the terminals. Using the insights to enhance and inform the different lines of business that make up the airport ecosystem, the presentation will explore how this tech is being integrated with SAN's existing food and retail locations and how it shapes the concessions design of a new terminal. By looking at experience design as a platform that ties together business needs with the touchpoints along a customer’s journey, SAN is engaging with technology in a way that streamlines internal operational needs and creates a more impactful experience for its customers.

What the audience will learn

  • How technology is being used to inform business concessions strategy and overall experience planning
  • How experience designers can structure their department as a platform to engage others
  • How to influence both new-build planning and existing terminal spaces
  • How to avoid the pitfalls of innovation for the sake of development

16:05

Boosting revenue and tackling airport challenges with digital solutions

Mieke Struik
Head of scaling and commercializing
Royal Schiphol Group
Netherlands
Tim de Bie
Head of commercial platform
Schiphol
Netherlands
Digital has been a key factor for years now in the way the passenger journey is changing. Schiphol has the ambition to develop digital products that not only benefit its NPS but also boost its revenues. Schiphol's ambition is not limited to its own airports but extends to making its products available to the wider market.

What the audience will learn

  • How digital can boost NPS
  • How to generate new revenue streams from digital products
  • How to accelerate innovation in this area sector-wide
  • The products Schiphol makes available to the market

16:35 - 17:30

Panel discussion: The airport as an integrated digital marketplace

The airport marketplace is evolving, rapidly transforming into an integrated digital retail space. All non-aeronautical services (lounges, parking, retail) are likely to be available for passengers on an intuitive digital platform, helping them curate a personalized travel and retail experience. This can be further expanded onto network airports and destinations, allowing passengers to purchase items and experiences like duty-free products, concert tickets, tourist attraction tickets, etc, all within the integrated airport digital marketplace. The future airport business model will therefore move from charging per square foot to per transaction. This will have an effect on airport retail commercial contracts.

What the audience will learn

  • The concept of an airport as an integrated digital marketplace
  • How a single, intuitive airport digital platform could help passengers build their entire airport experience
  • How the integration could expand to network airports and destinations
  • The future of the airport business model the - move from charging per square foot to per transaction (the e-commerce model)
  • The modification of retail commercial contracts
Guðmundur Daði Rúnarsson
Chief commercial and airport development officer
Isavia
Iceland
Wouter Van den Broeck
Strategic advisor
Royal Schiphol Group
Netherlands
Maurice Jenkins
CIO
Miami International Airport
USA
Rick Belliotti
Director, customer experience design and innovation
San Diego County Regional Airport Authority
USA
Vikas Gupta
Founder and CEO
GrayMatter Software
India
Panel Moderator:
Sujata Suri, vice president strategy and commercial development, Hamad International Airport (MATAR)

Opening Day Party hosted by Groupe ADP. Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Customer service and passenger experience

Day 1: Wednesday, June 15

Customer service and passenger experience
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Brian Engle
Director of customer experience
Greater Orlando Aviation Authority
USA
Jerry Angrave
Customer and passenger experience director
Empathyce Customer Experience
UK

09:05 - 09:55

Panel discussion: What does diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) mean for airports?

Diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) have become essential in business or enterprise planning and implementation to attract high-quality applicants, foster more energized employees, increase job satisfaction, and improve overall profitability. As with the civil aviation sector, airports have increasingly become more international in all aspects of their business activities, including customers, contractors, employees, and suppliers, necessitating a diverse employee population. To achieve long-term success, airports, airlines, and other elements of the civil aviation sector will need to integrate DEI into their organization. Speakers from academia and the airport industry will discuss their experiences and offer recommendations.

What the audience will learn

  • What is Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI)?
  • Why is DEI important to the aviation industry?
  • How have airports integrated DEI into their business enterprise model?
Anita Chagar
Diversity network lead
Heathrow Airport
UK
Tom Ruth
President and CEO
Edmonton International Airport
Canada
Panel Moderator:
Dan Wong, associate professor and aviation management program leader, Prince Sultan University, Saudi Arabia

09:55

Creating an interdependent airport environment for a sustainable passenger experience

Christopher Salem
CEO/executive coach
CRS Group Holdings LLC
USA
An interdependent airport environment thrives over time, empowering passengers to play a part in the experience they desire. Addressing change starts with your airport's core values, and progresses by leading by example and being resourceful at all levels with your personnel and passengers to create a more sustainable experience. Knowing each other's roles and duties, along with the ability to relate and understand passengers’ requirements in terms of communication is vitally important for fostering engagement as part of the process over time. Learn how to create and implement a better passenger experience from core values and resourcefulness.

What the audience will learn

  • The importance of core values for expanding higher engagement with your personnel first and then with passengers
  • The five most effective ways to foster higher engagement with passengers through being resourceful
  • How to shift from a co-dependent to an interdependent environment that creates greater passenger retention
  • How leading by example helps your personnel to create more sustainable value for passengers
  • How to sustain a better passenger experience over time

10:20

Knowledge 4 innovation

Gail Onat
Strategy consultant and educator
ENMAC
USA
Passengers are the driving force behind the word ‘Innovation’ and the thinking process can only start by finding out the perceived problems that touch their lives. Only after understanding these problems does innovative thinking begin. But innovation is not only about products: it is a combination of everything that makes the passenger's life secure, healthy, comfortable and fulfilling. Therefore, knowledge is the foundation. But how do we build this knowledge and how do we use it to achieve this ultimate goal? The answers are in the presentation.

What the audience will learn

  • No matter how young or old a business is, innovative thinking should become a mandated part of operations
  • Innovative thinking is about understanding human life
  • Passengers are the cultivation point of business and their environment is more dynamic than ever. How do we adjust?
  • Along with the passengers, all employees who make the journey happen need to adapt to this tremendous change
  • The result is a sustainable, foreseeable and secure future for the next generation

10:45 - 11:05

Break

11:05

Covid-19: evolution of passenger sentiment and behaviors

Dimitri Coll
VP airport customer experience
ACI World
Canada
This session will present the results of the ASQ traveler survey, which confirm that travelers remain highly positive and looking forward to air travel. Since the 2020 survey, travelers have developed a more considered and informed perception of the crisis and its impact on their behavior. The research shows that 48% of respondents have traveled since the beginning of the pandemic and suggests that respondents who have traveled during the pandemic are more likely to travel by air again sooner and more frequently. This presentation will highlight new passenger behaviors and expectations, the overall perception of the pandemic, main barriers to travel, intention to travel and traveler profiles.

What the audience will learn

  • Understanding new passenger behaviors and expectations
  • Speed of return: who, when and why?
  • Key factors/barriers that could delay the intention to travel
  • Expected measures (from the airports, from authorities)
  • operational and commercial challenges

11:30

Transforming the guest experience by setting the service standard

Clare Armstrong
Head of passenger services
London Luton Airport
UK
Mathew Garner
Director
Ethos Farm
UK
Following the creation of a new guest experience strategy pre-pandemic, we are on a transformation journey to deliver a great guest experience by setting the standard for our own staff and stakeholders.

What the audience will learn

  • Customer experience transformation
  • Collaboration
  • Accountability for the end-to-end customer journey

11:55

Quality of Service Framework - beneficial results for passengers

Pushpalatha Subramaniam
Director of consumer affairs
Malaysian Aviation Commission
Malaysia
The presentation will cover the development and implementation of the Quality of Service (QoS) Framework at two major airports in Malaysia and address whether the pandemic affected service standards.

What the audience will learn

  • The systemic issues faced by the airport operator and the airport community
  • The importance of involvement in key airport operator's operational meetings - getting your hands dirty
  • The importance of transparency - monthly engagement with the airport operator to announce results - an opportunity for discussion prior to announcement to the public
  • The importance of co-creation of service standards and the need to review service standards based on data and continued engagements
  • Engagement is the new norm

12:20 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45 - 14:35

Panel discussion: Airport customer experience and technology in the pandemic era

The presentation will examine the pandemic as a game-changer to the aviation industry, second only to 9/11, and will take a look into the subsequent effects on customer expectations and the evolution of the airport business proposition. It will additionally cover the role of technology since the pandemic era and its effects on passenger satisfaction, including commonly observed technological advances in airports and whether these are here to stay or are passing trends that may fade as passenger concerns related to Covid-19 slowly fade.

What the audience will learn

  • How passenger expectations, behaviors and priorities have changed since the pandemic in terms of airport facilities and services
  • How the airport business proposition has evolved since the pandemic based on changed passenger expectations.
  • The technological advances made by leading global airports since the start of the pandemic, such as automation, self-service and touchless technology
  • How these technological advancements have helped with passenger confidence and satisfaction in post-pandemic air travel
  • How these changes have affected the airport business and whether they are here to stay
Antoine Rostworowski
Senior vice president, programs and commercial services
ACI World
Canada
Dr Ian Cesa
President and CEO
Horizon Consumer Science
Australia
Robyn McVicker
Vice president, passenger journey
Vancouver International Airport - YVR
Canada
Panel Moderator:
Sujata Suri, vice president strategy and commercial development, Hamad International Airport (MATAR)

14:35

Finding the pot of gold: airport customer journey mapping

Marcelo Mota
Director of operations and COO
Aeroportos Brasil Viracopos SA
Brazil
Daniela Fantinati
Head of quality management and customer experience
Aeroportos Brasil Viracopos SA
Brazil
Airports are critical environments where there has to be good orchestration of the balance between capacity and demand to deliver operational efficiency and service quality. One important aspect of this orchestration is the design of the passenger flows from the perspective of the customer journey, ensuring that crucial aspects of service quality are in place and contribute to a better customer experience. The presentation will discuss a useful framework for mapping such a journey and address practical approaches that can help airport managers devise and implement features derived from key criteria for service design and delivery.

What the audience will learn

  • How to improve the chances of meeting customer requirements, achieving operational excellence and delivering sustainable service quality
  • How to assess the airport’s passenger flows against key criteria for service design and delivery
  • New opportunities to satisfy passengers and make the airport more competitive and operationally efficient
  • The impact of an efficient customer journey management framework on an airport’s operational performance and client satisfaction

15:00 - 15:50

Panel discussion: Measuring for success: innovative approaches to airport CX measurement

This panel discussion will explore innovative approaches, processes and tools that airports can use to deliver innovative approaches to CX measurement. With changing passenger segments, airports have an increasing need to maintain an active pulse on the passenger experience. With multiple channels of data – such as industry benchmarks, surveys and real-time data methods – airports also have a need to integrate data in a productive way. We will discuss innovative methods to capture, integrate, analyze and visualize data across the airport to improve the passenger experience. We will also discuss people, process and technology capabilities required to accelerate and enhance this.

What the audience will learn

  • Innovative channels to capture new types of passenger data throughout the journey and conduct root cause analysis
  • Required people, process and technology capabilities needed for effective CX measurement
  • How multiple discrete data sources can be effectively integrated to create a cohesive picture of passenger needs
  • The role of different types of data in understanding the passenger experience and how each can contribute to overall understanding
  • How airports can get started on measuring CX in new ways, and how to avoid and overcome past pitfalls
Beatriz Guillen
Director of revenue management
Iberia Airlines
Spain
Kathy Haley
Chief customer experience officer – aviation
Port Authority of New York and New Jersey
USA
Preston Peterson
Director customer experience innovation
American Airlines
USA
Matthew Macy
Director, public sector
Medallia
USA
Panel Moderators:
Jack Appelbaum, manager, strategy and analytics, Deloitte Consulting
Elizabeth Krimmel, senior manager, Deloitte Consulting

15:50 - 16:10

Break

16:10

Embedding passenger experience KPIs in the airport ICT masterplan

Michalis Senis
Airport ICT practice leader and expert
Munich Airport International
Germany
The correct definition and automated measuring of the right key performance indicators (KPIs) is a main driver for achieving high scores in the Airport Service Quality Score (ASQ) rating. Defining these KPIs and embedding these functional requirements in the early design of the ICT ecosystem during the airport/terminal construction is crucial for achieving your ASQ target, minimizing any future investments and adaptations. The presentation will cover the methodology in real case studies in new airport construction projects.

What the audience will learn

  • How customer experience is embedded in an airport digitalization roadmap
  • Why customer experience is a symbiotic relationship that delivers strong airport growth
  • How ICT is an enabler of measuring customer experience
  • Which items influence customer experience in an airport masterplan
  • Which systems actually measure the ASQ metrics

16:35

The future of operational excellence

Koen De Cleyn
Operational improvement manager
Brussels Airport Company
Belgium
Korijn Defever
Senior manager - operational excellence
Airport Intelligence
Belgium
In a post-pandemic world, the buzz words are digitalization and sustainability, but what role does operational excellence play here? Through the concept of the airport operations plan (AOP), operational excellence is brought into the future in a digital manner. Thanks to the use of advanced technologies, the AOP allows targeted and proactive decision making by a thorough understanding of the demand, and enables it to be balanced in a data-driven and sustainable way with the available capacity. This presentation will explain how the AOP at Brussels Airport triggered new insights and gave the airport ecosystem the ‘crystal ball’ it needed.

What the audience will learn

  • Why operational excellence is still relevant and hot today despite being the cornerstone of operations for so many years
  • How you can digitalize the management of your operations and what is the link with sustainability
  • How to use advanced technologies to better manage airport operations
  • The role an AOP can play in the digitalization of airport operations

17:00

Eyes on the prize: balancing short-term experiences with long-term vision

Mookie Patel
Chief business and finance officer
Austin-Bergstrom International Airport
USA
Geoffrey Ax
Americas aviation practice leader
Populous
USA
The fundamentals of airport design have changed. Meeting passengers’ basic needs is no longer standard. Today’s travelers expect and deserve more. Their dollars demand it. They aren’t reminding themselves that the misery of construction will be worth it in 10 years – they want traveling to be an incredible experience now. How do you balance customer experience in the short term while pursuing long-term design plans? When spaces and experience are designed with empathy, airports can utilize smaller-scale projects and renovations to stay on time and on budget with their larger goals. Learn more through the Austin-Bergstrom International Airport case study.

What the audience will learn

  • What airports can learn from the most cherished gathering places and events when it comes to urban design and activation
  • How to put underutilized space to work delighting your customers and giving them a welcome distraction from their worries
  • Why it is important to understand an airport’s existing experience and learn more about its customer base through journey mapping
  • How to de-stress the airport environment and prime your customers to spend on worthwhile experiences
  • How to best utilize your resources for new spaces and experiences in between large-scale projects

Opening Day Party hosted by Groupe ADP. Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Environment and sustainability

Day 1: Wednesday, June 15

Environment and sustainability
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Emanuel Fleuti
Head of sustainability and environment
Flughafen Zürich AG
Switzerland
Dr Mary Kerins
Former head of health, safety, sustainability and environment at daa
Mary Kerins
Ireland

09:05

Climate change and future airports: rising sea levels and changing tourism demand

Rachel Burbidge
Senior policy officer - environment and climate change
Eurocontrol
Belgium
The impacts of climate change are operational, infrastructure and business risk for airports around the world. Rising sea levels will threaten infrastructure and disrupt operations, resulting in significant costs. Meanwhile, changes in temperature and precipitation will alter tourists’ destination preferences, leading to changes in tourism demand patterns. But when will this happen and by how much? The new Eurocontrol study on climate change risks for European aviation has the answers!

What the audience will learn

  • The extent to which European airports are at risk of sea level rise
  • the cost of an airport being closed due to coastal flooding and how traffic is affected
  • The destinations which are expected to see an increase or decrease in tourism demand due to climate change
  • How this will impact air traffic passenger demand
  • What can an airport do to adapt and build resilience to climate change?

09:30 - 10:20

Panel discussion: Three H2020 green airport projects towards a more sustainable future

Climate change is an unprecedented and major challenge. In order to tackle this challenge, the European Commission set the European Green Deal, with the objective of achieving a climate-neutral continent by 2050. In this context, three ‘sustainable and smart mobility’ H2020 projects were selected by the European Commission in 2021. The OLGA, STARGATE and TULIPS projects – respectively led by Paris-Charles de Gaulle, Brussels and Schiphol Airports – will contribute to the acceleration of the environmental transition of operations at airports, demonstrating the feasibility of implementing and disseminating environmental innovations. These innovations will be presented by the panelists.

What the audience will learn

  • STARGATE will develop, test and implement innovative solutions to make the airport ecosystem and operations more sustainable and efficient
  • TULIPS will deliver demonstrations in airport operations that accelerate the collective ambition to drastically reduce emissions and local impact
  • OLGA will take a holistic approach to environmental innovation at airports, reducing the environmental footprint from passengers', airlines' and neighborhood perspectives.
  • This panel will cover sustainable aviation fuels, low carbon mobility, hydrogen production and use cases.
  • The panel will further cover the circular economy, biodiversity, air quality improvement, the green apron and zero-waste operations.
Christel Vandenhouten
Head of sustainability, business line owner STARGATE
Brussels Airport
Belgium
Fokko Kroesen
Strategy and airport planning - sustainability expert, project director TULIPS
Royal Schiphol Group
Netherlands
Yannael Billard
Head of environment – energy department
Groupe ADP
France
Panel Moderator:
Alexandra Covrig, senior project manager, Airport Regions Council

10:20

EU policy towards a decarbonised aviation

Dominik Piotrowski
Deputy head of unit for aviation policy, DG MOVE
European Commission
Belgium
Dominik Piotrowski, Deputy Head of the Aviation Policy unit in the European Commission, will present the Commission’s vision for a decarbonised air transport sector and the policy actions to make sustainable flying a reality by 2030 and 2050. The presentation will draw on the latest decisive regulatory steps towards a greener sector.

What the audience will learn

  • Carbon footprint of aviation, the current situation
  • Policy action at EU level
  • Policy action at global level

10:45 - 11:05

Break

11:05

How to consider material reuse at the project feasibility stage

Stanislas Lego
Sustainable design manager
Groupe ADP
France
This presentation explores one of the most interesting solutions to reduce the carbon footprint of construction: equipment and material reuse – particularly the ways to develop reuse in the feasibility phase.

What the audience will learn

  • Equipment reuse
  • Reuse in the feasibility phase
  • Impact of reuse on carbon footprint

11:30

Noida International Airport – India’s most sustainable airport

Nicolas Schenk
Chief development officer
Noida International Airport (a Zurich Airport International company)
India
Klaus Bode
Director
Urban Systems Design
UK
Noida International Airport aims to become the first net zero energy-rated airport in India, including delivering a unique combination of three sustainability targets: IGBC Green New Building - Platinum, IGBC Health and Well-Being and IGBC Net Zero Energy Building. Noida International Airport has been designed to provide a truly net zero carbon airport, minimizing energy demand through intelligently integrated passive design elements that respond to the local climate, placing human comfort and well-being at the heart of the design whilst fully offsetting operational energy with on-site renewables. Extensive indigenous planting throughout the terminal supports passenger well-being and assists in climate control.

What the audience will learn

  • Passive measures including appropriate massing, orientation and intelligent envelope design act to carefully balance heat gains and daylight
  • The application of environmental buffer zones, including a covered forecourt, that gradually temper the local environment and reduce cooling loads
  • About the generous outdoor Park Plaza with green infrastructure and rich landscaping, including local species to encourage biodiversity and minimize irrigation
  • About the external landscaped courtyard within the airside environment that enables mixed-mode ventilation and reduces cooling loads by cooling intake air to plant below
  • The significant use of on-site renewable energy generation to offset operational energy and support the net zero energy commitment

11:55

Airports as an anchor for decarbonized aviation

Tai Hollingsbee
National building engineering leader
GHD
Australia
Connected thinking can have a positive effect on our environmental impact. The presentation will discuss airports as a global battery bank, terminals as integrated energy stations and aircraft as end-of-lifecycle waste processors. If we connect supply chain waste streams to the construction and operation of airports, we start to move toward a closed-loop economy. If we are bold and help facilitate the decarbonization of aircraft fuels by considering aviation infrastructure as an integrated network of waste processing, fuel creation and carbon abatement, we could move toward a sustainable future faster than we think.

What the audience will learn

  • How breaking down supply chain inputs and outputs can benefit the aviation sector
  • The airport as a battery and a micro power station for precincts
  • Aircraft technology pushing the boundaries of design in terminals and buildings
  • Whole-of-life design and the closed-loop economy can save opex and reduce the total environmental impact
  • How to achieve a net-zero-enabled terminal ready for a future where the airport regenerates ‘natural capital’

12:20

Sails to the wind – new sustainability strategy at Fraport

Eva Janka
Project manager for corporate strategy and digitalization
Fraport AG
Germany
Every European airport signed the Net Zero Declaration, but many of them just use compensation to reach the target. Everyone knows that innovations are needed to really reduce CO2 and use renewable energy wherever possible. But where does all this renewable energy come from? The use of air or wind is the basis of air transport, so why not use wind to generate energy? FRAWind is just one of many new projects with which Fraport is ushering in a new era of sustainability strategy – innovative, comprehensive and open-minded.

What the audience will learn

  • Our new sustainability strategy
  • Deep dive FRAWind: production of renewable electricity from onshore and offshore wind power
  • Other possibilities: how to create on-site generation of solar power at the airport

12:45 - 14:00

Lunch

14:00

Sustainable Aviation Fuels: Trends and Challenges

Emanuel Fleuti
Head of sustainability and environment
Flughafen Zürich AG
Switzerland
Sustainable aviation fuels (SAF) are considered key for the decarbonization of the aviation sector. And fueling takes place at airports. This presentation outlines the trends and limits of SAF, describes the fuel and logistics process and discusses the impacts on airports. It closes with a case study from Zurich Airport.

What the audience will learn

  • Trends and limits of sustainable aviation fuel
  • Supply and logistics process of SAF to airports
  • Consequences for airports

14:25

Hydrogen – strategic choices

Simon Webb
Head of zero carbon strategy
ATI / Rolls Royce
UK
John Beasley
Associate director
Ove Arup and Partners
UK
Although airports’ initiatives to reduce their carbon footprints are welcome, it is aviation itself that faces the biggest challenge to meet the net-zero target by 2050. This can only be achieved through the transition to new aviation fuels. This talk will explain the role that hydrogen can play. The implications of adopting hydrogen at all levels – from geopolitical issues and government policy through to national infrastructure – will be discussed. Delegates will become acquainted with the key facts and figures that will inform decision making, allowing them to understand what a transition to hydrogen means for their businesses.

What the audience will learn

  • Putting the scale of hydrogen for aviation into context
  • How hydrogen demand for aviation compares with other potential uses of hydrogen in the UK
  • The potential sources of green energy to create the hydrogen
  • The changes that need to be made to the national infrastructure to support this supply chain
  • Why the aviation sector must influence government policy to support the use of hydrogen

14:50 - 15:40

Panel discussion: Introducing green propulsion in Europe: a hypothesis for airports and airlines

The discussion will cover a strategy for a fast transition from carbon-based fuels to hydrogen. The basic premise is that the early development of capable aircraft will enable a more gradual conversion of airports into hydrogen hubs. Capable hydrogen aircraft will be able to cover much airspace on the basis of a very small number of refueling hubs, capitalizing on the concept of tankering, i.e. flying into an airport and taking off without refueling. A fleet of early hydrogen-fueled aircraft is proposed and it will be shown that it can cover a wide range of European routes comfortably with just two hypothetical hubs.

What the audience will learn

  • Hydrogen aircraft and the application of hydrogen in airports
  • The approach to transform the aviation industry at relevant scale
  • The concept of tankering - very useful with hydrogen given its very light weight
  • Hypothetical examples of refueling return and polygonal flights at hubs only show that a wide range of destinations can be reached
  • Gradual development of hydrogen airports will permit faster access to market and commence decarbonization
Meiltje de Groot
CEO
Groningen Airport Eelde NV
Netherlands
Dr Nazmiye Balta-Ozkan
Associate professor in energy economics
Cranfield University
UK
Prof Pericles Pilidis
Director – thermal power
Cranfield University
UK
Karl Lyndon
Partner - aviation
Buro Happold
UK
Panel Moderator:
Henrik Rothe, senior lecturer for air transport management, Cranfield University

15:40 - 16:00

Break

16:00

How transparent wood procurement supports community and climate resilience

George Seaman
Engineering project manager
Port of Portland
USA
Jacob Dunn
Associate principal
ZGF Architects
USA
Given mass timber’s ascent and its climate mitigation potential, understanding the community and ecological impacts of wood sourcing will only become more significant. Portland Internal Airport set out to intentionally procure wood for its new main terminal from landowners trying to rebuild their communities while increasing their forest’s carbon sequestration. Addressing both issues took innovative business-as-usual procurement to track 7,000 cubic meters of regionally sourced wood back to origin forests. This approach allowed PDX to reduce its carbon footprint by 30%; target wood from sustainable, climate-smart forestry operations; and economically support vulnerable rural timber communities.

What the audience will learn

  • The challenges and benefits of different transparency and tracking approaches to sustainable wood procurement
  • How the embodied carbon of large buildings and forest management practices are related to climate change
  • How airport construction procurement can reward local landowners, like families, community forests, and tribes for revitalizing social and economic infrastructure
  • How to identify and bridge current gaps in carbon accounting, particularly around forest carbon
  • The business case for aspects of mass timber, especially transparent wood sourcing, to support climate and equity solutions

16:25

Airports’ role in boosting carbon sequestration with nature-based solutions

Aly El-Hadji Ouattara
Head of risk management and compliance department
Aeria
France
Sofyan Martin
Project manager - aviation
Egis
France
To address the climate emergency we need to explore and use all the possible levers available to us. What if soils were one of the solutions to tackle climate change? Healthy soil captures twice as much CO2 as the atmosphere does. This presentation aims to reveal the potential of soils at airport platforms and hubs, by sharing Abidjan Airport’s feedback and experience. Thanks to nature-based solutions, it is possible to upgrade green outbuildings through simple and accessible development actions, considering the operational and financial constraints of the airport environment.

What the audience will learn

  • Soils can be assessed in a scientific way thanks to the latest advances in research
  • Local carbon sinks can be enhanced thanks to the implementation of scenarios mobilizing natural solutions
  • New technologies have been developed to precisely predict and monitor the carbon and biodiversity performance
  • Carbon sequestration can lead to social benefits and territorial inclusion for airports and the local stakeholders
  • Despite operational and technical constraints, it is possible to implement nature-based solutions locally

16:50

Whole-lifecycle carbon

Dr Qian Li
Principal engineer
Cundall
UK
Cundall will present the Carbon Assessment Tool and construction materials database developed for Hong Kong, to access the performance of building and infrastructure projects. With demand growing for net-zero carbon development, this tool aims to drive low-carbon design at the design stage with the ability to compare options and encourage the specification of low-carbon materials to capture carbon savings. Within the tool, an industry benchmarking system has been developed to measure performance and drive change. This presentation will explain how the tool was developed and how it can be used to reduce the upfront carbon in development.

What the audience will learn

  • The importance of accounting for carbon in construction and refurbishment
  • The approach to measuring whole-lifecycle carbon
  • The basis for the CIC and how it can be used to assess carbon on projects
  • Net-zero-carbon buildings and what this means

Opening Day Party hosted by Groupe ADP. Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Technovation

Day 1: Wednesday, June 15

Technovation
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Catherine Mayer
Vice president
SITA
USA
Maurice Jenkins
CIO
Miami International Airport
USA
Pierre Charbonneau
Senior advisor – passenger experience
UFA
Canada
Samuel Ingalls
Principal consultant
Barich
USA

09:05 - 09:55

Panel discussion: Autonomous technologies and resiliency

Advancements in autonomous technology have the potential to significantly enhance the resiliency of aviation and border security processes. The recent pandemic has spurred the aviation community to identify which systems will provide the biggest benefit and how they can be integrated into ongoing operations. This panel will explore ongoing developments in autonomous technology, operational concerns and lessons learned from use cases to provide potential adopters of autonomous technologies with a better understanding of available capabilities, their impact on operational resiliency and the best way to move forward.

What the audience will learn

  • Autonomous technology overview: system types, mobile versus stationary systems, multi-system deployments and data collection
  • The right solution: matching autonomous technology and capability with operational need and environment
  • Logistics: adjusting for autonomous vehicles in the operating plan. Use cases and lessons learned
Brian Cobb
Chief innovation officer
Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (CVG)
USA
Donald Zoufal
President
CrowZnest Consulting, Inc.
USA
Kieran Sheridan
Vice president - airline relations
Vanderlande Industries Inc
USA
Panel Moderator:
Anne Marie Pellerin, managing partner , LAM LHA

09:55

Boosting the digital airport – Fraport Digital Factory

Claus Grunow
VP corporate strategy and digitalization
Fraport AG
Germany
One year ago, Fraport launched its Digital Factory, a virtual business unit that accelerates digital transformation across the group. The conclusions of its first full year in operation are very promising: it leverages cultural change in terms of digital and agile thinking across the company; it serves as a tremendous stimulus for innovative projects and collaborative approaches; it has a proven track record of business impact; the process fosters cooperation between a small and powerful core team and the business units across the company.

What the audience will learn

  • Why set up a Digital Factory?
  • Process to success: how to set up a Digital Factory?
  • Getting >n projects per year over the finish line effectively
  • Co-operation with a powerful solution partner
  • Lessons learned after Y1

10:20

Building the digital twin airport

Axel Angeli
Cybernetician
Logosworld Technology & Research GmbH
Germany
Digital twins are virtual worlds that give you the illusion of real life and solve the big challenge of coping with the exponentially growing complexity that is inherent in any real Industries 4.0. A flight simulator is a digital twin for a real aircraft. Digital twins allow architects to demonstrate the result of a design before money is spent on real concrete. Digital twins are enablers. Get a grip on their potential and hear how they work. Share our excitement and enter with us the era of evolution by design with digital twins.

What the audience will learn

  • How Industry 4.0 works for airports
  • The trend of digital twins
  • How AI, IoT and serious gaming work hand in hand

10:45 - 11:05

Break

11:05

Building a passenger-centered travel future with flow data and AI

Nick Batchelor
IT director
London Gatwick Airport
UK
James Williamson
CEO
Veovo
UK
Understanding passenger flow throughout airport facilities forms the basis for many operational and customer service decisions but most airports are not equipped to do this. With its goal of becoming the ‘passenger airport of choice’, London Gatwick has embarked on a comprehensive IOT and digitization strategy to improve its understanding of customers’ movements and needs – right across the airport. The speakers will present how LGW is harnessing data from the airport’s passenger-related processes to gain the flow insight needed to make better plans, predict bottlenecks and make the right real-time decisions to ensure travelers have a first-class experience.

What the audience will learn

  • How AI helps LGW to reduce overheads while improving services
  • Flow insight can identify paths to increased revenue by understanding how passengers travel to the airport, park, move, dwell and shop
  • Getting started is easier than you think. The key is to first unlock the data in current passenger processing/IOT systems
  • Sustainability can and should happen across all decisions: how Gatwick looks towards cloud technology to support its sustainability strategy

11:30 - 12:20

Panel discussion: Accelerating AI and digital through a strategic roadmap

The airport ecosystem is complex, with multiple stakeholders advancing often-independent technology priorities. However, technology at airports is most effective when it is integrated, aligned and coordinated with the same goals. This panel session will explore the importance of technology roadmaps, and how they are vital to advancing technologically-forward airports and driving better outcomes for passengers and operators. For specific AI-driven solutions, a roadmap is critical to defining a clear business case and justifying investment in solutions. This panel will explore strategies airports can take to assemble their technology roadmap and how they can use them to advance key tech priorities.

What the audience will learn

  • A technology roadmap is a critical enabler for advancing technology innovation and a tech-forward agenda at airports
  • Shared visions behind a roadmap can align airport ecosystem stakeholders around shared efforts, helping everyone be more efficient
  • Roadmaps are about making decisions, not just about sequencing initiatives. Deciding what not to do is important
  • Roadmaps can be oriented to the airport’s current efforts and maturity level, focused on foundational or more advanced AI solutions
  • How to take strategy to tactical implementation via clear plans and business cases
Melissa Conley
Executive director capability management and innovation
Transportation Security Administration (TSA)
USA
Nicholas Woods
Chief information officer
Manchester Airports Group
UK
Simon Brown
Enterprise architect, airline operations
easyJet
UK
Sjoerd Blüm
CIO
Royal Schiphol Group
Netherlands
Panel Moderator:
Martin Bowman, aviation director, Deloitte

12:20 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

Total airport management and digitalization: challenges, benefits and learnings

Flemming Hølvold
Digital business developer, aviation
Avinor AS
Norway
Ole-Anders Iglerød
Airport operations manager
Avinor
Norway
Through the last year, the term TAM has been mentioned more than once on more than one occasion, and in more than one meeting. But what does this actually mean, how shall we deal with it, and are there actually any benefits in this for us and our customers at the airport? In this presentation, Avinor will present its progress with TAM, with specific and concrete examples of what has been done on the way, the main challenges encountered on the way, and what the next step will be.

What the audience will learn

  • What TAM is - no precise definition exists
  • Whether airports need to deal with TAM
  • The benefits from TAM for the airport, the passengers and the airport stakeholders
  • What Avinor's understanding of TAM is, and how the company has tackled it so far

14:10

Digitalization of airport operations in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Mohammed Alshammari
ICT general manager
Riyadh Airport Company
Saudi Arabia
Despite the negative effect of the global pandemic on the aviation industry, since March 2020 there has been a spike in activity in some airports, focused on changing passenger journeys and optimizing costs as well as providing more flexible and efficient operations. In KSA, these projects align with Vision 2030. In this co-presentation with Riyadh Airport Company, we will talk about the digital transformation in the KSA capital’s airport and specific aspects of those projects that will be interesting for other airports.

What the audience will learn

  • The role of airports in Vision 2030 and the future of this industry in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • The complexity of delivering digital projects in the middle of a global pandemic
  • The tangible outcomes of the projects
  • Lessons learned and advice to other airports
  • Lessons learnt and advise to other airports

14:35

Story of a modern and digital airport destination

Mahmood Al Sediqqi
Vice president, director information technology
Bahrain Airport Company
Bahrain
Bahrain International Airport (BIA) is equipped with state-of-the-art technology to enhance efficiency, improve security and meet passengers’ growing expectations for a more seamless airport experience. Advances in automation streamline some of the most time-consuming processes and procedures, reducing waiting times for passengers and giving them more control over their journeys. Bahrain Airport Company continues to invest in enhancing its ICT capabilities, enabling it to keep pace with the Kingdom’s digital transformation while supporting BIA’s ongoing development. Through the growing use of cloud-based solutions, Bahrain Airport Company has improved efficiency, security and scalability across the company.

What the audience will learn

  • BIA's collaboration success story
  • BIA's digitalization strategy
  • BIA's approach and implementation

15:00 - 15:20

Break

15:20

Digi Yatra: a seamless, health-risk-free travel process in India

Suresh Khadakbhavi
Assistant vice president Innovation Lab
Bangalore International Airport Ltd
India
At a time when travel is restricted, it is important for the aviation industry to rise to the occasion and make all modes of travel, transportation and tourism completely frictionless and free of health risks so that travelers are assured that they are safe. The benefits of single token biometric travel far outweigh the risks. There has to be a concerted effort from all aviation stakeholders to roll out the new transformation in processing travelers and validating their identity, travel, health and visa documents in a seamless, hassle-free manner. Digi Yatra is a bold attempt by India to embark on this fascinating journey.

What the audience will learn

  • How a pan-India biometric service was rolled out across India
  • How collaboration between the industry and the government agencies helped achieve this bold vision
  • The solution deployed and how it was undertaken
  • Key challenges faced
  • Leveraging startups for digital transformation

15:45

Narita Airport's journey to establishing an end-to-end biometric passenger experience

Hideharu Miyamoto
Senior executive officer / deputy executive divisional director of corporate planning division
Narita International Airport Corporation
Japan
Sarah Samuel
Senior vice president, airport & airline operations, APAC
Amadeus
Singapore
The adoption of biometric technology has accelerated since the Covid-19 pandemic, as airports all over the world look to simplify operations and meet new passenger demands for more streamlined, contactless experiences. However, when biometric programs are siloed, the benefits only extend so far. The airports positioned to benefit most from their investments will be those that take an end-to-end view, considering how biometrics can facilitate the entire passenger journey. By taking a holistic approach enabled by automation and closer integration between airline and airport systems, airports can scale more effectively and minimize complexity, empowering passengers to manage their own biometric journeys.

What the audience will learn

  • Lessons learned by Narita Airport, how this approach is working today/what passengers think of the technology 12 months after launch
  • Benefits to airports of an end-to-end biometric passenger journey
  • What implementation of an end-to-end biometric journey really looks like
  • Why taking a holistic approach is important
  • Airport-specific biometric technology i.e. specific touchpoints, purpose-built cameras, etc

16:10

A seamless travel journey with an end-to-end biometric solution

Javed Malik
Group chief operations officer
AirAsia
Malaysia
Miguel Leitmann
CEO
Vision-Box
Portugal
The AirAsia’s contactless facial recognition passenger processing system, F.A.C.E.S (Fast Airport Clearance Experience System), gives passengers a seamless travel journey throughout the airport, from check-in to boarding gates. The contactless technology offers an identification, clearance, and safety monitoring environment. With a combination of facial and iris recognition, AirAsia’s passengers can check in for their flight, authenticate themselves through digital travel documents and board their flights, simply by strolling through the airport, reducing human interaction, and putting emphasis on health and safety.

What the audience will learn

  • The path to data monetization for leading digital companies
  • How to leverage technology for customer activation initiatives
  • How to implement a seamless travel journey

16:35 - 17:25

Panel discussion: LAX adopts biometric e-gates for international departures

Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) now boasts the largest deployment of biometric e-gates in the US with the highest number of airlines targeted to use the technology. This is the result of a close cooperation between LAWA (Los Angeles World Airport), the US CBP (Customs and Border Protection), technology provider Easier (and partner Idemia) and many of the world’s airlines, including Lufthansa. The deployment coincided with the inauguration of the new West Gates at Tom Bradley International Terminal in May 2021 and highlights how innovative technology and processes combine to improve passenger experience while making travel safer.

What the audience will learn

  • Customs perspective: the United States' efforts to deploy biometric boarding for all departing flights (technology, processes and legal considerations)
  • Airport perspective: LAX’s decision to invest in e-gates and other innovative technologies being deployed at the largest US O&D airport
  • Airline perspective: why Lufthansa is one of the most proactive airlines in embracing biometrics boarding and the challenges and rewards.
  • Technology perspective: the challenges and solutions in connecting up to 50 airlines to technology some of them have not used before
  • What is next for biometric passenger processing
Aura Moore
CIO
Los Angeles World Airports
USA
Diane Sabatino
Deputy executive assistant commissioner, office of field operations
US Customs and Border Protection
USA
Patrick Sgueglia
Biometrics product manager
Lufthansa
Germany
Panel Moderator:
Hervé Muller, general manager, North America, EASIER

Opening Day Party hosted by Groupe ADP. Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Airport cities, transport connections and regions

Day 2: Thursday, June 16

Airport cities, transport connections and regions
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Alexandra Covrig
Senior project manager
Airport Regions Council
Belgium
Sergi Alegre Calero
Director general
ARC - Airport Regions Conference
Belgium

09:05

Creating airports as lovable destinations

Michala Lander
Technical director - social planning
GHD
New Zealand
Airports are uniquely placed to act as location ‘ambassadors’, helping to promote the best of what their home cities and surrounding regions have to offer. Viewed in this way, airports can be reimagined as lovable destinations that are much more than transit points; they can be destinations in and of themselves. To capitalize on this means identifying and understanding the most compelling and appealing attributes of their location during the airport design phase. The potential payoff is significant: a thriving, vibrant aerotropolis precinct that supports regional development and tourism.

What the audience will learn

  • Identifying the unique attributes of a city and how these can be used to connect an airport with its environment
  • Focusing on the ‘people experience’ so that airport precincts are designed to cater for visitors, workers and residents
  • Presentation of the Loveable City Framework and its application for an aerotropolis, using the Western Sydney Airport case study
  • Applying world-leading people movement planning and data analytics capability to support placemaking, commercial opportunities and enhanced visitor experience
  • Considering the future role of airports and how they relate to communities

09:30

How a region can positively affect local airport development

Marja Aalto
Senior specialist, aviation
Business Tampere Oy
Finland
It's difficult to get airlines to commit to flight operations in remote areas of Europe. When the market is closed, the location is far away and your region is unknown by airlines; when there are only a few airlines operating from your airport – is there a way to make you known to the world? This presentation showcases how a small region can take matters into its own hands and raise awareness of its existence. With successful marketing and development work, the Tampere region has gone from being a hidden and unknown place to a known opportunity for new companies.

What the audience will learn

  • How a region can be a key operator in air transportation development work
  • The power of collaboration by regional companies when the working budget is low
  • How to market your regional industry and city development into a successful and accessible destination
  • How to connect local interest groups to support you and work together towards the same target
  • The power of visibility and strength in numbers internationally despite being small and unknown

09:55

Modus project: scenarios for future European multimodal air transport

Nadine Pilon
Research project manager
Eurocontrol
France
The overall performance of future European transport will depend on the alignment and optimization of multimodal transport, to provide a seamless journey for air passengers while mitigating capacity constraints. The four scenarios developed in the Modus project aim to explore how air traffic management (ATM) and air transport can contribute to improving passengers’ multimodal, especially combined air plus rail, journeys for better studying the impact on transport performance. They focus on particular aspects having the potential to significantly change the transport system: (1) pre-pandemic recovery (baseline), (2) European short-haul shift, (3) growth with strong technological support, (4) decentralized, remote and digital.

What the audience will learn

  • Passenger demand for multimodal mobility will evolve
  • Air-rail complementarity can improve passenger experience
  • Transport performance will be about sustainability

10:20 - 10:40

Break

10:40

Evolutionary infrastructure: a look at the horizon for spaceport master planning

Francis Walker
London studio director
Corgan
UK
The Global Spaceport Alliance (GSA) was established in 2015 with the goal of creating a global network of spaceports that will allow increased access to space, and that can serve as focal points and technology hubs in growing the space economy. As emerging typologies in the built environment, spaceports have the potential to be the social, economic and even cultural engines of 21st century communities. These communities strive to create bright futures for their citizens, with optimized mobility and connectivity; spaceports can be central to this aspiration, with the space industry the fastest growing industry today. The spaceport as an extension of the airport and air mobility as a platform for new communities.

What the audience will learn

  • The core definitions of spaceports
  • Global approaches to development
  • What we can imagine in the future

11:05

HKIA expansion plan – an airport city & 3RS

Kevin Poole
Chief representative, UK & Europe
Airport Authority Hong Kong
Hong Kong
The presentation will cover Hong Kong International Airport's expansion plan – taking it from a city airport to an airport city and three-runway system (3RS).

What the audience will learn

  • HKIA is more competitive and stronger post Covid-19
  • The business opportunities brought by HKIA’s three-runway system and airport city development
  • How HKIA expanded market catchment to the Greater Bay Area

11:30

The airport city, a sustainable economic development in interaction with the stakeholders

Hubert Fontanel
Real estate deputy director
Groupe ADP
France
When airports are looking for new sources of value creation as much as they are seeking to forge partnerships with the surrounding communities, the development of the airport city can provide an economic and urban response. Any urban development at the limits of an airport interacts strongly with the developments of the surrounding agglomerations in terms of the real estate market, as a part of a local competitive field and in terms of urban quality and connectivity. However, the traditional developments of airports, terminals and runways call for technical and commercial skills that come entirely from the aeronautical sphere.

What the audience will learn

  • How an airport may achieve profitable and resilient real estate developments meeting local markets and airport needs and constraints
  • How to mobilize the skills adapted for these developments
  • How to maximize income while maintaining control over the future of realized assets

11:55

Airport cities and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

Dr Viktoriia Myroniuk
Lecturer in aviation
Salford University
UK
The presentation will discuss the main United Nations Sustainable Development Goals which may and should be met by airport cities. The most prominent real-life examples and best practices from airport cities around the globe will be given. Not only the advantages but also the challenges to the economic, social and environmental sustainability of airport cities, as well as solutions to such challenges, will be looked into.

What the audience will learn

  • The main United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, which may and should be met by airport cities
  • Prominent real-life examples and best practices of economic, social and environmental sustainability from airport cities around the globe
  • Advantages and challenges to the sustainability of airport cities, and possible solutions

12:20 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

Implementing new mobility strategies to reduce carbon emissions at airports

Tine Haas
Principal aviation
Dornier Consulting
Germany
A significant amount of carbon emission is generated by passengers and staff traveling to and from the airport. Emerging new technologies and digitalization change the way people travel. This is a chance for airports to actively manage landside access and encourage a modal shift toward more sustainable travel options. Applications featuring MaaS and nudging approaches enable airports to create incentives for travelers to use public and shared-service transport. Similar solutions can be applied to the management of staff mobility needs. Mobility strategies have the potential to reduce the carbon footprint and improve the efficiency of airport operations at the same time.

What the audience will learn

  • Impact of new mobility on airport access
  • Mobility scenarios and new business models
  • Strategies for nudging toward more sustainable travel modes
  • Cooperation with MaaS platform operators

14:10

Creating a mobility hub to shape the future of mobility

Jennifer Berz
Senior project manager corporate strategy and digitalization
Fraport AG
Germany
The future of mobility will be fundamentally different from what we know today. While demand for mobility will thrive again after the pandemic, new means of transport and new market players will shape customer mobility. While customer preferences will shift, climate change will present new challenges. To overcome these challenges, airports need to fully embrace intermodality to address sustainability demands and provide a customer-centric approach to innovation and digitalization with regard to mobility.

What the audience will learn

  • What is a mobility hub and how it could address challenges from an airport point of view
  • Trends in mobility
  • Which trends affect airports and how they do so
  • Customers’ expectations of a mobility hub
  • How airports can develop into mobility hubs

14:35

How Covid-19 mobility trends revolutionize air transport and cities

Manuel Chaufrein
CEO and founder
Avairx
France
While the advent of more sustainable aviation solutions offers new opportunities, from SAF to airports becoming power hubs thanks to the development of hydrogen ecosystems, the Covid-19 crisis has set new challenges to the development and business of future airport cities. Remote and flexible work is epitomizing risks for office real estate developments, affecting the profitability of business travel; electrified advanced air mobility will start off with less profitable regional ranges, challenged by future ultra-high-speed ground transport, such as Hyperloop; and the revival of sleeper trains answers the quest for affordable travel. Can airports benefit from these trends and if so, how?

What the audience will learn

  • Seizing opportunities for new hyper-connected mobility solutions to develop airport cities and new business
  • Designing airports as next-generation mobility hubs 360°
  • Taking advantage of the Covid-19 new normal to develop innovative business models
  • Airports as social and work inclusion catalysts

15:00 - 15:20

Break

15:20

How can airport surface access help secure net zero carbon?

Shamal Ratnayaka
Aviation strategy lead
Transport for London
UK
In the context of the climate change emergency and COP26, this presentation sets out the key role that sustainable airport surface access can play in contributing to decarbonization in the aviation sector. This draws on the experience of London as the world's largest aviation market and home to six international airports and also looks ahead to the opening of Crossrail in 2022.

What the audience will learn

  • The need for a more holistic approach to airport surface access
  • The range of levers and interventions to drive sustainable mode shift
  • How London and its airports are rising to the challenge

15:45

Creating a sense of place: visionary and sustainable airport cities

Ashwini Thorat
Head of design and planning
Noida International Airport
India
Peter Jenkins
Architect director, head of transport sector
BDP
UK
The creation of successful airport city masterplans requires intense multi-disciplinary inputs including urban design, architecture, infrastructure, transport, commercial opportunities, marketing and ICT. Within the context of airport development guidelines, our work defines the principles of development that is underpinned by a sustainable surface transport strategy that incorporates both low-carbon and active travel modes. Our presentation will explain how to develop frameworks that are simultaneously visionary, deliverable and flexible, drawing on our recent work for our client at Noida International Airport.

What the audience will learn

  • Creating airport cities with local relevance and cultural connections
  • Integration of low-carbon and active travel modes for surface transport
  • Utilizing airport development guidelines to steer sustainable development
  • How cross-sector thinking maximizes viability in clients’ investments
  • Insights into how design consultants will support clients in a post-Covid world

16:10 - 17:30

Panel discussion: How can landside development drive innovation?

Airports face three big challenges: they need to find new revenue sources, they need to adapt to climate change and they need to automate and digitalize their operations. This panel investigates how strategic landside development can empower airports to achieve all three of these goals. Leading experts will explain how they’re leveraging the landside to drive innovation and help airports become more financially, environmentally and operationally resilient. Drawing on successful examples from Europe, North America and Asia, panelists will highlight the key drivers that determine the success of their landside development strategy - and how other airports can do the same.

What the audience will learn

  • How successful airports leverage the landside to drive growth and diversify revenue
  • How landside development can reduce the airport’s carbon footprint
  • How successful airports use the landside as a test bed for new technologies
  • How successful cities and regions develop the airport area to drive growth and create jobs
Arturs Saveljevs
CCO
Riga International Airport
Latvia
Arja Lukin
Director, Airport City Aviapolis
City of Vantaa
Finland
Brian Cobb
Chief innovation officer
Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (CVG)
USA
Inkie Kim
Project manager, airport policy division
Daegu Metropolitan City
Korea
Pálmi Freyr Randversson
CEO
Keflavik Airport Development Company (Kadeco)
Iceland
Pieter van der Horst
Project director
Schiphol Area Development Company
Netherlands
Panel Moderator:
Max Hirsh, managing director, Airport City Academy

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS ceremony and celebration. Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Airport design, planning and development (continued)

Day 2: Thursday, June 16

Airport design, planning and development
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Tim Walder
Senior director and aviation sector leader
Arcadis
UK
Prof David Holm
Architect director
Cox Architecture
Australia

09:05

The new Greek regional airports - open for business

Andreas Karvelas
Chief technical officer
Fraport Regional Airports of Greece Management Company S.A
Greece
Through innovative organization and detailed risk management, Fraport-Greece completed its €450m ‘Imminent Works’ program ahead of schedule and within budget, despite the challenges of difficult island logistics, multiple simultaneous work fronts and a worldwide pandemic. The 14-airport program saw the construction of five new, eight expanded and seven refurbished passenger terminals, as well as a cargo terminal in Thessaloniki. Bill will share the development process from the concession award through to final completion of the capital investment program for 14 all sites, across the entire Greek territory.

What the audience will learn

  • Delivery challenges for capital programs under a typical airport concession model
  • Risk assessment and mitigation for capital program delivery
  • Innovative approaches to airport expansion in constrained sites

09:30

State-of-the-art campus sets a new standard in airline operational excellence

Cagri Aksoy
Project and investments coordinating supervisor
Turkish Airlines
Turkey
Joseph Gonzalez, FAIA
Global director of design
Ghafari Associates LLC
USA
With the development of an all-new airport in Istanbul came the opportunity to plan and design a state-of-the-art operational campus for Turkish Airlines (THY) comprised of over 50 next-generation support facilities. The campus will total over 650,000 square meters (seven million square feet) and set a new standard in airline operational excellence. Our design is not only highly functional but also imparts a unified visual identity that thoughtfully applies the airline’s revamped global brand. Attendees will learn how we incorporated innovative technology and sustainable materials to develop a cohesive design representative of THY’s ambitious growth, corporate rebranding efforts and overall vision.

What the audience will learn

  • How to apply key skills to design complex projects like the seven million square feet 50-building campus for Turkish Airlines
  • Identify and define key elements that are crucial for successful global leadership: management, communication, local office presence and construction management
  • How the use of technology was critical to building consensus among the disciplines involved in the implementation of the campus
  • Understand the methodology and approach behind our design in terms of branding, application of sustainable materials and use of technology

09:55

Developing Copenhagen Airport for the future

Christina Okai Mejborn
Senior master planner
Copenhagen Airports
Denmark
CPH is developing the airport and preparing for future growth – focusing on sustainable solutions and ensuring support from stakeholders. A key element in this process is the articulation of a clear vision for the future of the airport as a tool for strategic decision-making. The presentation will give insights to the current update of the CPH long term master development plan and the Terminal 3 Airside Expansion project, which is currently under construction. Focusing on modularity and flexibility, the vision was key in revising phasing and re-scoping the project as a consequence of the Covid-19 pandemic impact on CPH.

What the audience will learn

  • How CPH works with developing visions for the future as a strategic tool in decision-making and achieving buy-in from stakeholders
  • Overview of CPH master plan and development strategy
  • Status and background on the T3 airside expansion project

10:20 - 10:40

Break

10:40

Understanding ORAT and how it contributes to sustainability

Sarah Talbot
Assistant director ORAT, infrastructure projects
Aéroports de Montréal
Canada
ORAT’s objective is to operate a new facility on day one as if it had been operated for years. Learn how ADM’s ORAT program can contribute to sustainability, as it adds to lifecycle analysis. Including ORAT early in the project decreases the risk of changes during construction and lowers the post-opening modifications, which results in less deconstruction and material loss. It supports commissioning in its attempt to be a cost-effective strategy for reducing energy, costs and GHG emissions in buildings. It includes stakeholders in the process. In short, ADM’s ORAT program helps to make the right project.

What the audience will learn

  • What is ORAT : a quick overviewAcronym's interpretationGoal and objectiveContribution to project management
  • Stakeholder's engagementADM's approach to include stakeholder in infrastructure projects, from planning to delivery
  • ORAT's contribution to environmentADM's commissioning approach to reduce energy, costs and GHG emissions.Less changes, deconstruction and material loss.
  • ORAT's contribution to society How ADM's ORAT programme improves community quality of life, equity and social justice.
  • ORAT's contribution to economyHow ADM's stakeholder engagement programme stimulates economic prosperity and develops local skills and capabilities.

11:05

Operational excellence with next generation airport systems

Aziz Can Aksoyek
Head of sales and business development
TAV Technologies
Turkey
Working on the next generation airport management systems and how to apply cutting-edge technologies such as big data, machine learning, IoT and mobile technologies is crucial to increase operational efficiency in airport operations. To create ‘smart airports’ of the future, airport technology companies bring in new architectural models such as microservices, containers and most up to date approaches such as user experience (UX) and design thinking (DT).

What the audience will learn

  • Improving operational performance and efficiency by adopting big data and machine learning (ML) technologies in airport management systems
  • New optimization methods, AI based suggestion engines and multi-KPI objective functions to meet varying optimization needs and goals of airports
  • Global and holistic view of airport operations with accurate and complete information on flights and resources
  • Modular and flexible software approach to processes to the Total Airport Management (TAM) concept using micro services architecture and containers
  • Empowering UX (User Experience) and Design Thinking (DT) principles to remove the frictions for operational users

11:30 - 12:20

Panel discussion: From operational readiness to operational resiliency through innovation and technology

Operating an airport during the pandemic was trying to say the least. Imagine handling day-to-day operations while constructing and opening new, world-class facilities. This discussion will detail how accomplishing the required ORAT elements by planning and developing the Covid-19 protocols allowed for opening day success. The presentation will discuss leveraging the airport's testing and vaccination infrastructure to maintain the viability of the workforce, the use of innovative technology that lessened the physical interaction and increased the overall connectivity of stakeholder groups, the project protocols used in conjunction with ORAT principles and ultimately working with carriers on opening day protocols.

What the audience will learn

  • How to establish stakeholder working groups for maximum participation and coordination
  • How to effectively use technology to plan, execute and monitor your AOR/ORAT program
  • How to leverage your AOR/ORAT program for maximum benefit
  • How to ensure engagement and collaboration from start to finish
Michael Christensen
Chief operations and maintenance officer
Los Angeles World Airports
USA
Ken Warren
Capital program leader
Sea-Tac Airport, Port of Seattle
USA
Ortez Gude
CEO
Citiri, Inc.
USA
Panel Moderator:
Melvin Price, associate principal, Jacobs

12:20 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

Reconnecting Melbourne

Simon Gandy
Chief of infrastructure
Melbourne Airport
Australia
This session will cover Melbourne Airport's rebuild and relaunch, leaning forward with runway and rail and the green revolution.

What the audience will learn

  • Resilience through and beyond the pandemic
  • Maintaining momentum on legacy shaping infrastructure
  • Taking responsibility for our environmental footprint

14:10

Balancing innovation; a design roadmap for concourse expansion at DEN

Brett Hartle
Director of design and planning
Denver International Airport
USA
Christine Rajpal
Vice president, senior aviation architect
Jacobs
USA
Denver International Airport prioritizes being a world leader in sustainability, but also understands that there is a balance when implementing design decisions which must be viewed through the lens of the entire airport campus as a whole. Sustainability is not a ‘one size fits all’ model, and short-sighted decisions can have long-term consequences for one of the largest airports in the world. The presentation will discuss the design journey for the recent concourse expansions, which paved a roadmap for how DEN will continue to expand while also informing the future retrofit of existing airport facilities.

What the audience will learn

  • Transforming the passenger psyche; innovative digital wayfinding, improved natural daylighting and maximized views can revolutionize the passenger experience
  • Balancing design innovation; weighing competing factors such as cost, schedule, emerging technologies, existing context, maintenance and airline impacts
  • Progressive yet timeless; new concourse expansion designs must consider the compatibility of the existing airport but stay forward-thinking
  • Energy savings vs best value; understanding which HVAC, photovoltaic and technology façade strategies bring more value to the airport
  • Lifecycle analysis; sustainable design strategies and the impact of energy savings, operations and maintenance over time

14:35

Louisville Muhammad Ali International Airport and the future

Dan Mann
Executive director
Louisville Muhammad Ali International Airport
USA
Eric Peterson
Principal
Alliiance
USA
With its US$400m Terminal Transformation Project, Louisville Muhammad Ali International Airport is continuing its reputation as an industry leader in hospitality, efficiency, technology and possibility. With passenger traffic at record highs and with new air service options, the airport is expanding its capacity and level of service from curb to gate with state-of-the-art amenities and convenience. Sustainability is at the forefront, featuring the largest geothermal system of any airport in the USA. The project aims to achieve a 45% reduction in energy use, resulting in 60% combined utility savings due to lighting/controls geothermal and envelope improvements.

What the audience will learn

  • How to develop a holistic vision encompassing all aspects of passenger experience – and a road map to the future
  • Navigating high growth periods and balancing shifting short- and long-term needs
  • Empowering airport staff and consultant partners to exceed expectations and lift each other up in common purpose
  • Sustainability strategies
  • Balancing the needs of one of the world’s largest cargo airports with a vibrant commercial passenger facility

15:00

The new Aile Est at Geneva Airport

André Schneider
CEO
Genève Aéroport
Switzerland
Stephen Barrett
Partner
Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners
UK
The new Aile Est, assembled with the precision of a Swiss Watch, heralds a new generation of piers. The building offers an unparalleled quality of passenger experience for arriving and departing passengers, a colorful journey that benefits from unparalleled views and proximity to the aircraft. Furthermore, this project aims to improve the reception of passengers on intercontinental flights by responding to the standard of a high-level sustainable building (with over 100 geothermal probes and 7,000 square meters of solar panels).

What the audience will learn

  • Long-haul at Geneva: a new gateway to Switzerland
  • How constraints led to innovation: a pier that floats above the head of the stand road leaning toward the aircraft
  • First impressions matter – the arriving passenger experience: mountains, Toblerone and precision Swiss engineering
  • Wayfinding and identity: how color can help you navigate and rekindle the joy of travel
  • An energy-positive airport building: solar panels, geothermal probes, heat pumps, rainwater recovery, optimized daylight, triple glazing

15:25 - 15:45

Break

15:45

YVR’s new gates bring the outdoors inside

Nancy Stern
In-house architect
Vancouver Airport Authority
Canada
Martin Nogger
Senior associate, transportation leader
Kasian Architecture, Interior Design and Planning
Canada
YVR’s latest international departures and arrivals expansion was completed in 2021. The area integrates new contact gates with an enhanced RSO gate experience. It also includes new passenger amenities and space for future concessions. YVR’s bold sustainability goals challenged the design team to develop enhanced building envelope detailing, while continuing YVR’s signature terminal design. Showcasing the natural beauty of British Columbia, the expansion features a west coast island experience, kelp images, tidal pools and outdoor landscaped rockwork with Hemlock trees layered with a new immersive digital experience.

What the audience will learn

  • Integrating contact and RSO gates within a limited footprint and apron area
  • Enhancing passenger amenities – concessions, lounge seating, power charging, quiet room, prayer room, yoga space
  • Setting new YVR standard for sustainability in building envelope design
  • |Integrating digital and thematic installations to create a passenger experience showcasing the region’s natural environment
  • Phased construction working alongside an active airport and adding COVID protocols for the final stages of construction

16:10

Monterey Regional Airport new terminal concept

Michael LaPier
Executive director
Monterey Peninsula Airport District
USA
Thomas Schnetzer
Vice president
Kimley-Horn
USA
Monterey Regional Airport, located in a spectacular part of California and home to the world-famous Pebble Beach Golf Course, is moving its passenger terminal to adapt to a larger aircraft fleet and evolving safety standards. This is an opportunity to reimagine a brand-new terminal, planning and designing it for ultimate flexibility, incorporating sustainable features, and taking into account an aging population with a growing desire for air travel. Doing all this on a very constrained site is challenging, but has pushed the team to think innovatively.

What the audience will learn

  • What design features are important for a aging population that is very mobile
  • How to maximize a terminal site and balance airside, terminal building and landside needs
  • How to build a sense of place into a terminal plan at an early stage
  • How trends in airline aircraft fleet planning informs terminal planning
  • What is important while working on a site in an environmentally sensitive area

16:35 - 17:25

Panel discussion: No directions required - improving operations and wayfinding through the terminal

Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) is in the process of investing over US$15bn in new facilities aimed at improving landside access and operational efficiency while elevating guest experience through improved amenities. Integral to this transformation is the renaming of multiple terminals and the renumbering of approximately 150 gates at LAX to align more intuitively with airline alliances. The strategy implemented today will define operations for decades. Come, listen, and share as our panel discusses the strategy and logistics of this transition, including case studies and best practices pulled from other airports.

What the audience will learn

  • Best foot forward - a governance structure that spans static, digital and the content management system
  • Asking for directions - benchmarks and case studies from airports and other industries
  • Navigation - which stakeholders and agencies are responsible, accountable, consulted or informed
  • Familiar landmarks - the use of virtual reality as a powerful tool to document and catalog your inventory
  • You have arrived - campus-wide change or phased roll out; how many phases and what the implications are
Robert Schultz
Chief of airport planning - LAX terminals
Los Angeles World Airports
USA
Faith Varwig
IT strategist
Faith Group LLC
USA
Panel Moderator:
Justin Wortman, regional leader for aviation and transportation, HOK

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS ceremony and celebration. Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Aviation security, border control and facilitation (continued)

Day 2: Thursday, June 16

Aviation security, border control and facilitation
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Dr Jean Salomon
Principal
JSCP Consulting Partners
France
Philipp Kriegbaum
Retired senior aviation security expert
Philipp Kriegbaum
Germany
Art Kosatka
CEO
TranSecure
USA
Neville Hay
Director of training
Interportpolice
UK

09:05

A closer look at AI-based identity verification tools

Abdullah Elbi
Legal researcher
KU Leuven Centre for IT and IP Law
Belgium
The speaker will discuss the interaction between the future AI Act and the use of AI-based identity verification in the border check environment. The presentation delves into the classification of AI systems based on risk categories as laid down in the AI Act proposal and attempts to shed some light on legal obligations arising from the development and deployment of AI-based identity verification in the border control management. He will focus on the current societal and legal challenges (e.g. reliability of the systems, bias and discrimination and privacy concerns) arising from the application of these tools.

What the audience will learn

  • AI-based identity verification tools are increasingly used in border control management to ensure efficiency and security at borders
  • The deployment of these tools has been accompanied with growing concerns over the legal obligations imposed by the upcoming AI Act
  • How are AI-based identity verification classified under AI Act Proposal?
  • Which legal obligations arise from the development and deployment of AI-based identity verification?
  • Which challenges arise from deploying AI-based-based identity verification in border control?

09:20

Europe’s industry-changing ID management requirements at the service of the transportation industry

Georg Hasse
Head of international sales, homeland security division
secunet Security Networks AG
Germany
This presentation will cover Europe’s industry-changing ID management requirements at the service of the transportation industry

09:35

Facial recognition technologies used in border and boarding management systems: opportunity or challenge?

Stéfane Mouille
Labs director
Cabinet Louis Reynaud - CLR Labs
France
Kevin Carta
Biometric expert
CLR Labs
France
During this joint presentation, delegates will think about: Facial recognition systems, from video protection and access control to open mobile applications, fly to gate, mobile driving license, mobile digital travel credential and the state of play for the facial recognition value chain and main actors. Privacy concerns: Binding facial portrait/video and PNR? Are we going toward the push vs pull approach on facial portrait? How to build privacy by design in facial recognition systems in an airport? AI training for airports use case: Is the training dataset compliant with this specific environment? Is the silicon masks threat considered in your facial recognition system?

09:50

Entry/Exit System implementation: impact on facilitation in the airports

Marie-Eve Albertelli
Senior project manager
Groupe ADP
France
Quentin Devouge
Head of facilitation
Groupe ADP
France
The European Entry/Exit System (EES) to register entry and exit data for third-country nationals crossing the external borders of the Schengen area is expected to go live by October 1, 2022. The new regulation brings a major challenge in border crossing procedures as the capture of biometric data will be required at arrivals and departures for most third country nationals. To mitigate the impact, some border police and airports have taken this opportunity to implement smart borders, others a semi-manual process. For all, processing times, equipment financing and procurement and space allocation remain key issues in Covid times.

What the audience will learn

  • Understand the regulation requirements and the impact for the travel industry
  • Understand the process options and the associated impact on processing times and layouts
  • Share lessons learned on process and technology approaches

10:10 - 10:40

Panel discussion: Evolving goals and challenges of secure border management systems

The unraveling challenge faced by our industry is no loner how to arbitrate between security and facilitation, but how to successfully manage both. This panel will review the major pillars sustaining this objective, including the progress of biometric sensors, the biometric constraints of automated ID risk assessment, and the evolving state-of-the-art of large-scale smart border management.
Abdullah Elbi
Legal researcher
KU Leuven Centre for IT and IP Law
Belgium
Georg Hasse
Head of international sales, homeland security division
secunet Security Networks AG
Germany
Marie-Eve Albertelli
Senior project manager
Groupe ADP
France
Stéfane Mouille
Labs director
Cabinet Louis Reynaud - CLR Labs
France
Panel Moderators:
Philipp Kriegbaum, retired senior aviation security expert, Philipp Kriegbaum
Jean Salomon, principal, JSCP Consulting Partners

10:40 - 11:00

Break

11:00

Sofia International Airport’s vision for future EES-compliant hubs

Dr Henning Pfisterer
Chief operating officer (COO), member of the management board
SOF Connect Sofia Airport
Bulgaria
Additional border control procedures through EES significantly increase the time required for passenger clearance and therefore cause delays. This is not acceptable for airports or passengers. This case study from aviation hubs in Bulgaria shows a possible blueprint to address these challenges. Sofia Airport implemented process automation at key passenger touchpoints. Existing border control technology was comprehensively modernized in the midst of a pandemic, using ABC gates, self-service kiosks, camera systems and fingerprint readers. Although the new systems fulfill different functions, when combined they noticeably accelerate passenger processing and greatly reduce the workload of authorities.

What the audience will learn

  • Automation and process optimization ensure that time limits and increasing passengers numbers under
  • Space limitation at airports require flexible positioning scenarios of the systems for manual, automated and self-service border control
  • Lessons learned from connecting a highly secure and biometric infrastructure to provide a seamless experience to all passenger groups
  • Evaluation of results from the use of high-speed facial acquisition at the manual border control prior to EES operation
  • Lessons learned from a Schengen applicant – integrating special workflows and new technologies remotely in the midst of a pandemic

11:25

DHS Science and Technology Biometric and Identity Technology Center Research

Arun Vemury
Director, Biometric and Identity Technology Center, Science and Technology Directorate
U.S. Department of Homeland Security
USA
The DHS Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) Biometric and Identity Technology Center is S&T’s core biometric and identity RDT&E capability to drive enduring efficiencies and biometric innovations across DHS. The technology center’s research focuses on enhancing collection and matching capabilities; data security, privacy and integrity; next-generation identity documents and transactions; and identity linking and correlation.

What the audience will learn

  • An overview of the DHS S&T Biometric and Identity Technology Center
  • The technology center’s core research thrust areas
  • The path forward and opportunities for collaboration with industry and academia

11:50

Transforming arrivals into the United States using facial comparison

Diane Sabatino
Deputy executive assistant commissioner, office of field operations
US Customs and Border Protection
USA
CBP has transformed international arrivals using facial comparison technology. The new arrivals process, piloted in 2017-2018, was accelerated during Covid-19 and is now at more than 200 airports accounting for >99.5% of arriving passengers. This new process decreases contact between passengers and officers and removes the need for APCs and touchscreens. Using facial comparison technology, CBP quickly and reliably verifies a traveler’s identity biometrically and retrieves traveler records from CBP systems using the traveler’s face. This eliminates time-consuming steps for most travelers, such as document scans and fingerprint captures, and speeds up the inspection process.

What the audience will learn

  • How CBP uses advanced passenger data and holdings to facilitate a fast (<1 second) transaction that biometrically identifies a traveler
  • Lessons learned shifting from a passport-first system to a facial comparison-first system
  • How has Covid-19 created challenges to facial recognition including masks and plastic dividers, and how CBP has overcome these challenges
  • How CBP is looking to further transform the arrivals process now that passengers can be quickly and automatedly identified
  • How CBP incorporated protections for privacy and information security into the system

12:15

Biometrics and digital identity

Austin Gould
Requirements and capabilities analysis (RCA) assistant administrator
Transportation Security Administration (TSA)
USA
Diane Sabatino
Deputy executive assistant commissioner, office of field operations
US Customs and Border Protection
USA
Beyond COVID-19, digital credential technology has long-term potential in everyday society to boost the advancement of biometric and touchless processing. Digital health passports could unlock mass return to offices, concerts, and sport events, and enable a more convenient, contactless travel process from check-in to boarding and open the door to biometrics being used more widely throughout the travel ecosystem across airlines and airports. This presentation will explore the ways in which we can bring all these elements together successfully in order to scale the adoption of new digital identity and biometric approaches across the industry.

What the audience will learn

  • Passengers can help with TSA’s biometric journey by staying patient given the privacy and cybersecurity concerns which must be addressed
  • Biometric technology will demonstrate its worth by effectively providing the optimal passenger experience
  • CBP rolled out global entry totems with facial recognition to about 33 different locations, and the results have been incredible.

12:35 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

Theater of security design – upgrading security at Australian Airports

Krishan Tangri
Executive general manager, infrastructure and planning
Brisbane Airport Corporation
Australia
Robert Ousey
Principal - national sector leader - transport
Architectus
Australia
In recent tests in the US and elsewhere, high percentages of the undercover test passengers carrying prohibited items, including a variety of weapons, made it through security screening points at major airports. To effectively transform the poor performance of security spaces, the implementation of the latest screening technology and high-quality training for security personnel needs to be matched with the deterrent offered by the successful application of the ‘theater of security design’. In Australian Airports we might finally be getting it right with security spaces that say in every way, ‘Just try it. You are definitely going to get caught!’

What the audience will learn

  • How the planning and design of the security screening spaces at Australian Airports successfully leverages the ‘theater of security design'
  • How specific design elements contribute to a holistic security response
  • How high-quality design assists in creating better security staff cohesion and communications, resulting in improved efficiency and passenger experience

14:05

Schiphol's experience of CT scanners

Hedzer Komduur
Deputy director - safety, security and environment
Amsterdam Airport Schiphol
Netherlands
The presentation will comprise a review of Schiphol's implementation of CT scanners at the checkpoint, covering operational benefits, related costs and space and conversion of personnel.

What the audience will learn

  • Insight into why using CT makes sense at Schiphol
  • Insight into how we planned the deployment
  • Insight into the next steps in development

14:25

Upgrading Paris airports to ECAC EDS Standard 3

Emmanuel Lefevre
Terminal and BHS projects director
Groupe ADP
France
All European hold baggage screening should be upgraded to Standard 3-approved explosives detection systems (EDS) by March 2023 at the latest. Thus Groupe ADP is currently redesigning and reconfiguring its CDG and ORY baggage handling systems under the surveillance of the French and European authorities. In the end, more than 100 EDS will be installed for a total investment of €500m. This challenging upgrade has had to be conducted under running operation and in conjunction with other passenger terminal revamping projects. As such, special attention is paid to the work of the SkyTeam Hub, which handles more than 70,000 bags per day.

What the audience will learn

  • Security is priceless
  • Working jointly with authorities is crucial
  • Exogenous constraints cannot be ignored
  • BHS are hard to regulate and sensitive to interventions
  • Anticipation is the key

14:45 - 15:15

Panel discussion: Deter and detect

Investment in, development and deployment of technology sees great advancements in both the facilitating and screening of passengers and baggage. But what about airports who do not have the budget? And will advancement create other vulnerabilities and exploitation in the system?
Hedzer Komduur
Deputy director - safety, security and environment
Amsterdam Airport Schiphol
Netherlands
Emmanuel Lefevre
Terminal and BHS projects director
Groupe ADP
France
Krishan Tangri
Executive general manager, infrastructure and planning
Brisbane Airport Corporation
Australia
Panel Moderators:
Art Kosatka, CEO, TranSecure
Philipp Kriegbaum, retired senior aviation security expert, Philipp Kriegbaum

15:15 - 15:35

Break

15:35

Airports adapting to changes in security operations

Johnnie Müller
SVP, security services
Copenhagen Airports
Denmark
The tactical and operational side of security and managing the future. Adapting to the change in operations, what have airports done? Highlighting the ups and downs, the positive outcomes, what’s changed and lessons learned.

What the audience will learn

  • How the Covid-19 crisis not only created staff layoff and other challenges, it also created new opportunities for changes and development
  • How to seize the opportunity for change and development and make the hard and important decisions to reach for your goal
  • How to be an organisation with vision and a burning desire to build something new, but can't, because unpredictability strikes and priorities change
  • Having the desire for change but not the leadership power to develop and chase the desired change

15:55

Online training (during Covid-19) for aviation and border security personnel

Jonathan (Jon) Holland
Program director
Borderpol - the World Border Organization
UK
From the very early stages of the pandemic, organizations were required to react quickly, in terms of their training and educational programs. Many simply canceled/postponed all training in those initial stages. Others shifted from face-to-face learning to the online virtual platform. As the situation eased, in some parts of the world, we saw a partial return - albeit in hybrid format, with perhaps local students attending face-to-face in the classroom, and others (from further afield) participating online, via video link. Is online/virtual learning the new norm and fit for the future world environment?

What the audience will learn

  • The initial knee-jerk response (cancel/postpone)
  • The 2nd level response (adapt and convert online)
  • The interim/hybrid model (mixed participation)
  • The current situation (agency/location specific)
  • The future/way forward (leading to the Q&A)

16:15

Solving the document check nightmare to enable travel at scale

Irra Ariella Khi
CEO
Zamna
UK
We will be addressing how the permanent shift in testing, vaccination and further document check requirements is changing the world of post-Covid-19 travel. Governments have put pressure on airlines to solve this. We will be answering seven key challenges in facilitating passengers in the Covid-19 world: no new apps for passengers, no self-assertion of health data, no digital uploading, no physical paper checks, no scanning QR codes, no new process at the airport, meeting ever-changing regulations, and the ability to launch at scale NOW.

What the audience will learn

  • The options available to airlines in responding to a Covid-19 paradigm shift, unlocking health data using only existing check-in processes
  • Most passengers will not adopt new apps or processes. How do we unlock this while NOT manually checking passenger documents?
  • How to satisfy health document requirements before passengers arrive, with no new process needed from the passenger or the airline
  • Why apps don’t cut it: complying with ICAO’s NCLB ‘no country left behind’ initiative and ensuring inclusive solutions are delivered
  • How to assure next-level privacy, requiring the verification of not only identity data but now highly emotive health data

16:35

20 Years since 9/11: achievements and remaining pressing challenges

Philip Baum
Visiting professor, aviation security, Coventry University
Green Light Limited
UK
The 20th anniversary of the September 11 attacks allowed the media and the industry to reflect on the many subsequent achievements made to improve security in the skies and on the ground. While we rightly celebrate success, we must also avoid complacency and face up to the remaining challenges. This presentation looks at the broad range of attacks, often unassociated with terrorism, that have taken place, and examines whether our aviation security system is robust enough to prevent similar incidents in the future and proactive enough to counter the threats we know exist but have yet to see realized.

What the audience will learn

  • How to achieve a balance between using technology and embracing behavioral analysis techniques
  • The importance of recognizing that aviation security is far more than counterterrorism
  • How to face up to the limitations of our existing system and adopt a proactive stance to manage future threats
  • Recognizing that poor mental health is a security issue and cannot always be pigeonholed as a safety problem
  • Adapting our security techniques to identify threats in the (post-)pandemic world

16:55 - 17:30

Panel discussion: Security operations – future management

Short presentations from the speakers will lead the panel debate focusing on the impact and outcomes within the aviation industry. The panel will discuss how airports and airlines have had to adapt to new strategies, what it has meant for the tactical and the operational side of the business, the integration of new technology and processes and how these affect its operators.
Irra Ariella Khi
CEO
Zamna
UK
Johnnie Müller
SVP, security services
Copenhagen Airports
Denmark
Jonathan (Jon) Holland
Program director
Borderpol - the World Border Organization
UK
Philip Baum
Visiting professor, aviation security, Coventry University
Green Light Limited
UK
Panel Moderator:
Neville Hay, director of training, Interportpolice

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS ceremony and celebration. Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Commercial development and retail experience (continued)

Day 2: Thursday, June 16

Commercial development and retail experience
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Jeremy Corfield
Partner
CPI
Australia
Sujata Suri
Vice president strategy and commercial development
Hamad International Airport (MATAR)
Qatar

09:05

Putting hospitality at the core of the airport

Mathieu Daubert
Chief customer officer
Groupe ADP
France
The world of the airport is changing. Customers no longer want an exclusively functional, process-driven approach. After immigration and security, they want to live surprising and engaging experiences airside. Thanks to a disruptive and global strategy, which optimizes customer satisfaction and commercial revenues, Groupe ADP imagines a world in which retail and hospitality are placed at the heart of the airport, where passengers become guests of boutique hotels where they don't sleep, but live unique experiences.

What the audience will learn

  • Groupe ADP will transform the experience in the airport into a global hospitality experience
  • The experience of a terminal will no longer be the same for the passengers
  • After the controls and the queues, customers will live an experience that will surprise them in the reserved area

09:30

Partnership models for excellence in hospitality

Josselin Bourcier
Business development manager
TAV Operation Services
Turkey
The partnership mindset is a promising key differentiator in the travel hospitality industry in boosting the customer experience and creating synergies within the airport ecosystem. Such partnerships benefit from strong sales, marketing and operation excellence efforts owing to an already established network combined with specific know-how and valuable knowledge of the local environment.

What the audience will learn

  • How to create successful partnerships in the travel hospitality industry and for what purposes
  • How to create synergies between CIP lounge operators and other travel retail players to the benefit of customer satisfaction and SPP
  • How to promote win-win partnerships and sustainable business models between all stakeholders

09:55

Diversifying airport hospitality and maximizing commercial opportunities through technology innovations

Jonathan Song
Global business development director
Plaza Premium Group
Hong Kong
Over the past few years, the needs of the travel industry and the general consumer have drastically evolved. Expectations from the market have also changed, both from direct consumers and business partners. As the industry leader, PPG sees market gaps and strong opportunities for it to drive an industry-wide business re-modeling exercise to consolidate resources and efforts to support demand and distribution. Diversifying airport hospitality through the provision of a 360-degree travel journey to ensure a ‘peace of mind’ airport experience in the future is a top priority. A new perspective on addressing challenges and generating revenues through the empowerment of technological innovation will be examined.

What the audience will learn

  • How airlines, corporate bodies and airport authorities can diversify airport hospitality and elevate customer experience under the new travel era
  • About creating a new revenue-generating center by connecting the global passenger journey through technology
  • A new perspective on how airports can enhance end-to-end customer experience through the latest technological innovations
  • The insights on the latest airport hospitality solution and the future of airport lounges

10:20 - 10:50

Panel discussion: The evolution to a hospitality-led industry – emerging trends for creating value through experience

While an efficient operating environment is at the centre of any airport journey, the industry is now recognising the importance of evolving from an offer-led proposition to an experience-led proposition. Taking a lead from premium off-airport environments, and building on the emergence of more genuinely premium lounge experiences, how can the airport industry reposition itself as a hospitality-led industry, creating value through providing diverse, engaging and relevant experiences?
Mathieu Daubert
Chief customer officer
Groupe ADP
France
Josselin Bourcier
Business development manager
TAV Operation Services
Turkey
Jonathan Song
Global business development director
Plaza Premium Group
Hong Kong
Panel Moderator:
Jeremy Corfield, partner, CPI

10:50 - 11:10

Break

11:10

Airport central receiving and distribution centers (CRDCs) - across the pond

Steve Wareham
Principal
Steve Wareham Consulting LLC
USA
Martijn Steur
Managing director
Kinetic Consultancy
Netherlands
Empowering airports in their “last mile” delivery: secure, agile, resilient, and cost efficient. A CRDC operates as an intelligent delivery hub for the airport terminal. Airports utilize CRDCs to consolidate all in terminal consumables, including concessions and terminal inbound goods and to provide security, operational, logistical, financial, and environmental benefits. Case studies from the US and the EU can help the audience decide: Is a CRDC right for our airport? Our speakers are former airport directors in commercial retail (Amsterdam Airport Schiphol) and operations (Minneapolis St-Paul International Airport) who moved on to conduct CRDC studies for US and EU airports.

What the audience will learn

  • The basics of a CRDC: receiving, inspection/security and outbound sortation and delivery
  • Why current market trends and expanding airport concessions programs have necessitated the need for CRDCs
  • CRDC benefits as well as airport savings that can be credited to overall operational costs
  • Various ways that many airports cover the capital and operating costs of a CRDC
  • How to determine the need for unique CRDC program features (storage, commissary, grease removal etc.) for their own location

11:35

The landside – an underrated area with an unexploited economic potential

Max Schintlmeister
Managing director
Airport Experts GmbH
Austria
A well-designed landside integrates an airport’s passenger terminal, landside mobility and hence accessibility, providing an interface to the real estate development area. In contrast to the airside, the landside therefore provides a flexible common area for all airport business activities on the site. Via the landside, synergy and cross-fertilization effects will be maximized and the critical mass for additional commercial development can be achieved. By deploying current innovations like seamless security checkpoints, virtual queueing and passenger flow management, airports can place the passenger in the most efficient area and where the best experience can be created.

What the audience will learn

  • A framework for integrating the full business model into one land use plan
  • Creating new revenue streams
  • Minimization of risk exposure of airport development
  • Deployment of innovative solutions and products
  • Identification of the development options with the highest effects

12:00

Presentation to be announced

Basil Binns
Retail director
Miami Dade County
USA

12:25 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

Make money sitting in an airport terminal

Christof T Kontogiannis
Head of passenger experience
Cologne/Bonn Airport
Germany
Delivering a great passenger experience in view of increasing cost pressure is a challenge. Therefore, we have launched an initiative to open up innovative new business areas at Cologne/Bonn Airport. How to make money by sitting? We have replaced standard seating with wi-fi-connected high-tech seating. We offered passengers a new way to pay for a massage and to charge their cell phones just by scanning a QR code. Complex and expensive charging installations for airports will no longer be necessary in the future. Seating nowadays is provided without investment, on a revenue share basis.

What the audience will learn

  • The magic formula of cutting costs and increasing passenger experience
  • How to generate monthly revenues with terminal seating
  • Chairs for free! Innovative business models with manufacturers
  • Regulatory challenges
  • Lessons learned from Cologne Bonn Airport

14:10

Reimagining airport design to improve economics in the autonomous age

Sally Lee
Associate principal, education science and advanced technology
HDR
USA
New technology, big data and autonomous services are revolutionizing the way we conduct business. Personalized experiences in retail, business and even healthcare have raised consumer expectations. Airports can adapt many of these new systems to rethink and replace conventional revenue streams, enhancing their operations to match new customer expectations while adopting a more dynamic economic model that can remain resilient in different economic (and health) scenarios. Designing infrastructure to accommodate the autonomous technology needed for these new economic models will be key to benefiting from them.

What the audience will learn

  • The impact of autonomous technology on retail and traveler experience
  • New service options for recapturing traveler revenue
  • How big data can offer better, curated shopping experiences
  • The importance of health and wellness to airport revenue
  • How to repurpose yesterday’s infrastructure to accommodate tomorrow’s revenue streams

14:35

Ingredients for the wow factor – during and post pandemic

Kyrian Eke
Senior consultant
Munich Airport International
Germany
The pandemic had and still has a huge impact on the aviation industry, especially in terms of passenger experience. It is all the more important that airports create a positive customer journey. The presentation will highlight some key initiatives that airports need to have in place to lay the foundation for delivering the wow factor for their passengers – during and after the pandemic. It will explain how these initiatives increase the non–aeronautical revenues of airports. These can be tailor-made for each airport and don’t have to be expensive – on the contrary, in most cases they are revenue generators.

What the audience will learn

  • The importance of staff/community engagement in relation to the passenger experience
  • Creating a wow factor by adopting a sense of place
  • Benefits of creating a wow factor at an airport
  • The changing expectations of our passengers

15:00

Driving passenger engagement and performance in the post-Covid world

Stephen Hay
Global strategy director
Airport Dimensions (A Collinson Company)
UK
Covid-19 has turned the world upside down, but changes were happening before the pandemic. A new value exchange is emerging, where passengers are seeking a more personalized, customized and touchless digital relationship in exchange for increased spending and loyalty across the journey. As travel returns to growth post-pandemic, many of the old airport commercial and engagement models have been broken for good. Airport Dimensions draws on its latest airport experience research to outline what travelers expect from a more customized and digital airport experience and how airports and concessions can respond to and profit from these.

What the audience will learn

  • Traveler preferences, demand and expectations post-pandemic
  • The shift to a wider and better-monetized airport experience
  • The role of big data in the pivot to seamless e-commerce across the airport
  • Approaches to traveler engagement and management for increased satisfaction and performance
  • Best practice and market leadership

15:25 - 15:45

Break

15:45

Are we letting this crisis go to waste? Airport – airline partnerships reconsidered

Dr Patrick Bohl
Adjunkt Professor of marketing
Corvinus University
Hungary
The ever-increasing importance of non-aeronautical income and digitalisation has recently increased the number of airport managed e-commerce platforms, aiming for omnichannel solutions travellers are looking for. Still, most touch points during booking and travel are with airlines, not airports. Who owns the customer?” we are still asking ourselves, while the house is on fire: Covid-19 meant that on-board duty free had to be stopped, in some cases for good. This presentation provides airline and airport executives with alternative solutions to benefit without on-board assortment. It includes current industry practice, ideas from innovators and proposes future business models based on cooperation.

What the audience will learn

  • Future business models for increasing non-aeronautical revenues
  • Commercial opportunities for IT development
  • Data sharing initiatives between airlines and airports

16:10

AI as the new revenue generator for airports

Joe Waller
CRO
FetchyFox
USA
Companies have more access to customer data than ever before, but the ROI is only achievable when they can correctly interpret the actionable insights. The benefit of using data to guide your business is inescapable as we’ve seen with major retailers like Amazon, Alibaba and even Ikea. The presentation will discuss real-world examples of how utilizing AI can impact revenues and improve the customer experience, as well as how the airport’s closed ecosystem is uniquely positioned to benefit from this investment.

What the audience will learn

  • The key areas to focus investments for maximum ROI
  • Unique examples of how behavior data can improve business decision making
  • Tips for setting up strict privacy protocols to keep data secure

16:35

Using AI and predictive analytics to deliver a personalised shopping experience

John Rankin
Chief operating officer
Skyfii
Australia
Airports must understand passenger behavior to mitigate the evolving challenges they encounter. Knowing how passengers travel throughout a terminal can empower airports to do just that. This presentation will dive into the most common challenges we see airports struggle with and how an integrated technology and data solution can help. In addition, the audience will hear how airports use crowd analytics to improve airport retail operations and transform the passenger experience, and will leave with an understanding of how this can positively impact airport retail and business decisions.

What the audience will learn

  • The various use cases and benefits of an AI-driven integrated platform enables
  • How historical and real-time passenger analytics provide reliable evidence for commercial planning, operational performance, and investment decisions
  • How airport stakeholders use crowd analytics in new and innovative ways to improve efficiency and the passenger experience

17:00

Airport lounges: Unlocking the value and benefits for your airport

Matt Etchells
Global product director
CAVU (Founded by Manchester Airports Group)
UK
This presentation discusses how lounges have moved from what was an airline-led branding tool, into a significant financial contributor in the hospitality sector for many airports globally. It discusses how and why the market for lounges has moved, and more importantly, where the market is heading next. Emerging from Covid-19, lounges face many further challenges; resourcing, rising costs, supply chain disruption, and of course, ever increasing expectations surrounding guest experience. However, despite the challenges, we show the strong opportunities lounges continue to present as our products evolve, but also pivot and extend into new markets benefitting airports and their passengers.

What the audience will learn

  • Where the lounge market has progressed, and their importance in the overall airport hospitality sector
  • Where the sector is heading in order to continue to meet the demands of airport partners and guests
  • How airports can extract greater value from lounges through improved ‘joined-up’ thinking to the overall passenger journey
  • Why a cookie-cutter approach just doesn’t work from one airport to the next

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS ceremony and celebration. Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Customer service and passenger experience (continued)

Day 2: Thursday, June 16

Customer service and passenger experience
13:45 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Roberto Castiglioni, MBE
Director
Reduced Mobility Rights Limited
UK
Jerry Angrave
Customer and passenger experience director
Empathyce Customer Experience
UK

13:50

Making accessibility aspirational: Heathrow’s design standards for the future

Jenny McLaughlin
Project manager
Heathrow Airport
UK
Emily Yates
Head of accessibility and inclusive design
Mima
UK
Heathrow aims to become the world’s most accessible airport. This aspiration required consideration beyond the built environment and physical accessibility, and a design standard document that provided empathy-building narratives in addition to technical requirements. Created and reviewed by people with lived experience of disability – including Heathrow’s Accessibility Advisory Group (HAAG) – this document sets a standard for a holistic approach to inclusion for passengers and colleagues, building it into the fabric of the airport and its processes, procedures and values for years to come.

What the audience will learn

  • A different approach to creating accessible and inclusive design standards
  • The importance of empathy as an inclusive design tool
  • The capex and opex savings to be made by getting it right the first time round
  • How to engage with the purple pound to increase revenue
  • The importance of an internal culture change that can be achieved by considering the colleague experience

14:15

How to embrace innovation

Franco Cornarino
Innovation and digital manager
Torino Airport
Italy
Andrea Bertaia Segato
CEO and co-founder
Alba Robot
Italy
Innovation is one of the most overused words, but how can we define a unique model, achieve employee engagement and attract real, game-changer start-ups? The presentation will introduce an innovative platform that integrates autonomous and assisted driving in wheelchairs and personal vehicles, to provide a new and more efficient approach for PRM services within airports. This solution, presently under test, will improve the passenger experience and provide commercial appeal, thanks to assisted driving and the use of voice commands.

What the audience will learn

  • The definition of an innovation model
  • Employee engagement
  • Call for ideas
  • Why we need innovation

14:40

Innovation for improving the travel experience of children with ASD

Pilar Morón
Expert in infrastructure development projects
Ineco
Spain
Under the scope of innovative projects that contribute to removing cognitive barriers to achieve universal mobility, an app has been designed with the objective of improving the travel experience of children with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) and that of their companions by structuring and simplifying the process of traveling by plane. Key aspects such as the way these children comprehend and regulate their own emotions, as well as the importance of predicting and keeping them oriented through amusing games, have been considered in order to help them and their families during the whole process.

What the audience will learn

  • Big potential for improvement of traveler experience using new technologies
  • In the initial phase of the project, a design-thinking session was held with the participation of all the project’s stakeholders
  • Anticipation of the experience: visualize the main milestones of the trip, at home, in a playful and understandable way
  • Use of pictograms, stories, maps (people with ASD understand pictures much better than oral or written narratives)
  • Set up the travel context: reduce waiting times, provide relevant information and warnings at each stage of the journey

15:05

Airport UX simulation system for people with special needs

Ilya Brucksch
Manager planning and development
Launceston Airport
Australia
Karl Traeger
Principal
Architectus
Australia
The Airport UX simulation project (A-UX) is a fully interactive, multiplayer desktop and virtual reality system that may be adapted to any airport. A-UX is designed to support people with disabilities and special needs, allowing them to manage their anxiety levels through simulating the processes of using the airport prior to travel. A-UX also provides a training tool for airport staff to empathize with travelers with special needs. Staff experience the facilities they manage through the eyes of people with a variety of disabilities or special needs, improving the passenger journey experience and increasing efficiency in throughput.

What the audience will learn

  • The process and software we used with students from the Academy of Interactive Entertainment to generate A-UX
  • How we tuned A-UX with disabilities service providers and the people they support to simulate the experience of people with different needs
  • The testing and preliminary implementation outcomes at Australian Airports
  • How the simulation is connected to our architectural design models and our aviation functional assessment and capacity tool (FACT)

15:30 - 15:50

Break

15:50

United Kingdom airline accessibility framework

James Fremantle
Manager – consumer policy and enforcement
United Kingdom Civil Aviation Authority
UK
The UK CAA runs a highly successful accessible airport framework intended to improve compliance with accessibility legislation and drive continued improvements in airport accessibility. It will introduce a similar framework for airlines. In 2020 it completed a significant piece of research into the accessibility of airlines (both UK and international). The presentation will include the results of this research and set out plans for the introduction of the framework.

What the audience will learn

  • Learn about the CAA's role in regard to accessibility regulation.
  • Learn about the success of the CAA's airport accessibility framework.
  • Learn about the CAA's research into current levels of airline accessibility.
  • Learn about the CAA's plans for its airline accessibility framework.

16:15

Collaboration and training in assisted travel

Everita Strelca
Accessibility and PRM manager
TUI
UK
After Covid-19 we are operating in new and unpredictable environment. Our aviation sector has returned to a siloed state in many aspects. Meeting the needs of customers with disabilities and reduced mobility is based on collaboration in between stakeholders. It is neither the suitable arena for competition or blame. Instead we should be aiming towards harmonisation across the sector. An integral component to is that of effective training so that we will empower our staff to understand the needs of the customer and meet their expectations.

What the audience will learn

  • A refreshed perspective on assisted travel activities
  • Benefits of collaboration
  • Benefits of training
  • Risks of continuing along our current path

16:40 - 17:30

Panel discussion: Airport accessibility: building inclusion into aviation sustainability plans

Sustainability should include social considerations, such as the need to ensure persons with disabilities have full and equal access to air transport. As these people represent a growing part of the world's population, accessibility also makes business sense for the aviation industry, contributing to economic sustainability. This panel will share examples of recent initiatives that are raising the bar towards greater air travel accessibility for persons with disabilities. It will discuss the evolution of the concept of disability, of universal design, and how to address challenges related to infrastructure, regulation and the use of mobility aids.

What the audience will learn

  • Accessibility is a topic that will only grow in importance
  • Airports should actively consult with disabled persons
  • Universal design is about making facilities usable by all people
  • Innovation and digital solutions can help improve journeys for disabled persons
  • Regulation is not a benchmark to meet, but should be seen as a starting point
Emily Yates
Head of accessibility and inclusive design
Mima
UK
Laurel Van Horn
VP director of programs
Open Doors Organization
USA
Manuel Lanuza
Manager, airport development
IATA
Switzerland
Panel Moderators:
Roberto Castiglioni, MBE, director, Reduced Mobility Rights Limited
Nathalie Herbelles, senior director, security and facilitation, Airports Council International

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS ceremony and celebration. Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Environment and sustainability (continued)

Day 2: Thursday, June 16

Environment and sustainability
09:00 - 13:15

Introduction by Conference Chair

Dr Mary Kerins
Former head of health, safety, sustainability and environment at daa
Mary Kerins
Ireland

09:05

The viability of carbon capture at the airport

Dr Chikage Miyoshi
Reader in environment systems for aerospace
Cranfield University
UK
Kevin O'Sullivan
Lead engineer
SITA
UK
Learn about the results of a Cranfield University research study into the feasibility of carbon capture and sequestration at airports using innovative new technologies (such as growing modified seeds for soil carbon capture).

What the audience will learn

  • About current abatement and offset measures
  • How effective and mature these technologies and approaches are and how many startups there are in this domain
  • Whether airports can use carbon sequestration as a revenue source
  • Whether the carbon captured has any meaningful offset to the carbon emissions of an airport

09:30

Creating the right conditions for sustainable airport development

Ronald Lunstroo
Sustainability expert and systems developer
Schiphol Group
Netherlands
Schiphol is well positioned to build back better post-Covid-19, thanks to its foresight to frame a sustainability ambition early last decade, with dedicated strategy and management buy-in. When sustainability pressures increased, this allowed the airport to focus on what needed to be achieved and the question of how such programs can be delivered in the airport built environment was answered. The airport-management-endorsed strategy allowed fully circular infrastructure development based on common KPIs for the airport, consultant and contractor.

What the audience will learn

  • Best practices for making sustainability integral to the future development of the airport
  • Examples of airport projects that have successfully adhered to the sustainable concept of circularity
  • How airports can create a partnership of trust with common sustainability KPIs for the airport, consultant and contractor

09:55

Implementation of a carbon budget system for construction works

Sébastien Malaussène
Engineer
Groupe ADP
France
Romain Clouzeau
Project manager
Groupe ADP
France
Aéroports de Paris, in line with the French national carbon mitigation strategy, aims to reduce the CO2 emissions produced by its construction works and buildings. Therefore, the company is developing a new tool that will enable it to forecast the GHG emissions of its construction projects portfolio and eventually set targets in line with IPCC recommendations.

What the audience will learn

  • The impact of construction works on the GHG inventory of an airport
  • The principles of carbon budget systems
  • How we can forecast GHG emissions at an early stage of a project

10:20

Ireland West Airport - sustainability road map

Tomás Grimes
Infrastructure and sustainability programme manager
Ireland West Airport (Knock)
Ireland
Cristina West
Associate
Atkins
UK
Ireland West Airport, officially known as Ireland West Airport Knock, is an international airport 5.6km southwest of Charlestown, County Mayo, Ireland. Knock Airport (IWAK) is the fourth busiest in the Republic of Ireland. The aviation sector can play a critical role in sustainable development whilst supporting the economic prosperity of the region in the northwest of Ireland. The presentation will outline the airport's recent steps to achieve Level 1 Airport Carbon Accreditation and future plans to achieve higher levels of accreditation whilst linking the carbon agenda with the wider national and international sustainability agendas.

What the audience will learn

  • The airport’s activities and sustainability aspirations
  • The challenges and practicalities faced by a regional airport in achieving ACA Level 1 accreditation
  • Key considerations when planning for higher levels of accreditation and their timings
  • Insights into how to develop a realistic carbon management plan aligned not only with carbon neutrality but also Net Zero
  • Linkages between carbon management for accreditation purposes and sustainability strategy and management

10:45 - 11:05

Break

11:05

Building airport resilience in the face of disruptive (climate) events

Hitoshi Seguchi
Deputy manager
Kansai Airports
Japan
Joeri Aulman
Airport planner and project manager
NACO, a company of Royal HaskoningDHV
Netherlands
In September 2018 Kansai Airport witnessed a total disruption of its operations leading to the closure of the airport for two weeks. This was not due to a health calamity such as Covid-19 but instead a severe climate event. Typhoon Jebi caused massive storm surges that allowed waves to over-top the island airport’s sea defenses, leading to flooding of the airport. In this presentation, lessons from the first responder team will be shared, as well as innovative approaches to building flood resilience for airports in the face of climate events.

What the audience will learn

  • Best practices from first responders faced with a disruptive event
  • Innovative mitigation measures to make airports more resilient to climate impacts in the future
  • Use of data modeling to develop robust solutions
  • Use of innovative stakeholder engagement ‘circle tool’
  • Unique challenges faced by Japanese airports

11:30

Paris-CDG Airport: innovation and digital as drivers for biodiversity management

Nicolas Bernard
Head of the aeronautical infrastructure division
Groupe ADP
France
Yannael Billard
Head of environment – energy department
Groupe ADP
France
We developed a project called BiodiversIT to respect the environment, preserve biodiversity and present a virtuous image. It involves deploying sensors that, associated with dedicated AI algorithms, will be able to provide information on the presence of remarkable and undesirable species in order to eliminate the use of phytosanitary products and enhance the value of projects and maintenance operations.

What the audience will learn

  • Initial feedback on the difficulties of automating measurements in large areas
  • A method for assessing biodiversity at airports
  • Consequences of glyphosate dependence and experiments to get out of it

11:55

Achieving Zero Net Energy at San Francisco International Airport

Erin Cooke
Sustainability and environmental policy director
San Francisco International Airport
USA
Raphael Sperry
Associate
Arup
USA
This presentation will explore the building, infrastructure and culture/behavior change strategies to eliminate carbon emissions from the SFO campus. It will discuss how to define ZNE for an airport, how to move towards that goal and how to overcome hurdles on the way. SFO has invested in new buildings, including the first LEED Gold airport terminal in North America, a zero net energy airport operations facility (AOF) and the first potentially LEED v4 Platinum terminal in the US. Just as importantly, SFO has changed the culture of its staff, how it works with its consultants and how it manages its relationships.

What the audience will learn

  • The range of definitions of ZNE for an airport campus and their implications for meeting a ZNE goal
  • How to recognize typical barriers for achieving ZNE at airports
  • How to design and implement a ZNE strategy for a multi-building campus
  • Stakeholder engagement methods for ZNE planning
  • Key sources of energy use and carbon emissions at airports

12:20

Sustainability and operational efficiencies @airport – two sides of the same coin?

Lars Mosdorf
Managing and labor director
Flughafen Duesseldorf GmbH
Germany
Sergio Colella
President Europe
SITA
France
Flughafen Duesseldorf GmbH will share real-life experiences of key initiatives around energy management and airport operations optimization from a sustainable perspective, sharing results in terms of local emissions improvements and cost savings. Moreover, the session will explore the key lessons learned and the further steps on the net-zero journey.

What the audience will learn

  • What you can do, starting now, as an airport, to improve your energy consumption and carbon footprint
  • How much optimizing your operations can contribute to your sustainable journey
  • Can we improve operations, be more sustainable, have positive ROI and generate new revenue streams?
  • What can we do next – the high potential initiatives on a net-zero path

12:45

CO2 neutrality ACA LVL 3+ Hamburg Airport 2021

Julian Klaassen
Environmental engineer
Hamburg Airport
Germany
This presentation will give an insight into the measures Hamburg Airport takes and took to reach the ACA LVL 3+ - CO2 neutrality. This will include what the airport did to reduce the greatest amount of CO2 emissions, the technological changes that have been implemented, and how the carpool changed and what had to be done. An all-round view of the CO2 neutrality of Hamburg Airport will be given.

What the audience will learn

  • Energy Saving
  • Energy Transformation
  • Car pool change
  • synthetic

13:10 - 14:00

Lunch

Future airports

Day 2: Thursday, June 16

Future airports
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Kiran Merchant
Vice chairman
Merchant Aviation
Rick Belliotti
Director, customer experience design and innovation
San Diego County Regional Airport Authority
USA

09:05

Towards green airport operating: changes in the passenger terminal and airside

Edward Arkwright
Deputy CEO
Groupe ADP
France
Climate change mitigation, air quality improvement and biodiversity preservation are challenges at the forefront of civil society expectations. Given this context, expectations are high for aircraft manufacturers, airlines and airports, among others. Action appears to be a prerequisite to maintain the license-to-grow and even license-to-operate of the sector. In this context, airports can play a significant role in promoting more sustainable aviation, given their ability to provide solutions that will not only reduce their own impact – by decarbonizing their energy production, for instance – but also help all third parties to limit their impact (airlines, ground handlers, passengers and employees).

What the audience will learn

  • Transition from a historical model based on permanent growth to a new paradigm of sustainable development adapted to the traffic
  • New approaches to fulfill hospitality and operational excellence: multimodality, construction methods, excellence and sustainability of operational modes
  • Innovation as a key driver, a way to better passengers' experience, operations and infrastructures (VTOL technologies)

09:30 - 10:20

Panel Discussion: The innovation conversation

Following on from "The Conversation" in our Virtual Conference in January 2021,the common consensus was that Aviation needed to be sustainable and we needed to co-operate more. We'll look at examples of sustainable solutions and co-operations – and discuss what is needed for the future.
Karin Gylin
Head of innovation
Swedavia
Sweden
Claus Grunow
VP corporate strategy and digitalization
Fraport AG
Germany
Steve Armitage
Head of technology design and innovation
Heathrow Airport
UK
Suresh Khadakbhavi
Assistant vice president Innovation Lab
Bangalore International Airport Ltd
India
Panel Moderators:
Rick Belliotti, director, customer experience design and innovation, San Diego County Regional Airport Authority
Mats Berglind, innovation manager, Swedavia

10:20 - 10:40

Break

10:40

How CVG Airport is rotating on sector innovation into revenue

Brian Cobb
Chief innovation officer
Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (CVG)
USA
The term ‘sector rotation’ is more commonly used in investment strategy. It’s the movement of investments from one industry to another to maximize yield. With the speed of innovation comes the complexity of decision making in what to look at, when to consider and how to start. CVG Airport is looking at innovation development in specific sectors as portfolio opportunities to add new streams of revenue. Like any investment, there's an understanding that the innovation adoption curve will likely shift and the airport's portfolio needs to be agile enough to pivot in order to protect revenues gained and reinvested for growth.

What the audience will learn

  • How a mid-size hub became known for its innovation firsts
  • What sectors are sought after and how are they sourced
  • When the timing is right and who is involved in the implementation
  • Protecting our assets; why cyber is the sum of all fears
  • What the portfolio future forecast suggests on sector rotation

11:05 - 12:20

Panel discussion: The future of airports

What have been the priorities for airports in terms of post pandemic challenges? In developing airport culture and keeping the human touch in building passenger confidence? Addressing economic, social and climate changes over the next decade and building back confidence in the industry.
Candace McGraw
CEO
CVG Airport
USA
Hari Krishnan Marar
Managing director and CEO
Bangalore International Airport Limited
India
Kadri Samsunlu
CEO
iGA Istanbul Airport
Turkey
Serkan Kaptan
CEO
TAV Airports
Turkey
Tom Ruth
President and CEO
Edmonton International Airport
Canada
Panel Moderator:
Kiran Merchant, vice chairman, Merchant Aviation

12:20 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

Geneva Airport – terminal ambition plan to public tender

André Schneider
CEO
Genève Aéroport
Switzerland
Peter Rieff
Airport architect
NACO, Netherlands Airport Consultants
Netherlands
Geneva Airport is embarking on a new program to make its terminal facilities futureproof and aligned with the changes our industry is facing. The journey that the airport undertook to reach this point is worth sharing with our industry partners. Starting with a clean slate – thinking about opportunities, not only constraints – set the fundamentals for the feasibility study on phased implementation, given Covid budget constraints. The resulting program is rooted in the Terminal Ambition Plan and aligned with all identified challenges, ready for the next stage of design by means of a public competition.

What the audience will learn

  • Best practices in meeting changing requirements in the aviation sector by smart adaptation of existing infrastructure
  • How airport development projects can be conceptualized despite ‘constructability’ and budget constraints, especially now due to Covid
  • Insights into the upcoming public tender for the design development of Geneva Airport’s terminal development

14:10

TWA Hotel: rebirth of an aviation icon

Tyler Morse
Chairman and CEO
MCR/Morse Development
USA
The iconic former TWA terminal at JFK, designed by Eero Saarinen in 1962 and abandoned since 2001, has undergone a dramatic transformation to become the TWA Hotel – a mixed-use facility with guest rooms, event space, dining and shopping at the center of JFK. Conference attendees will hear how the developer worked with 22 government agencies to preserve and adaptively reuse the historic building, bringing the jet age back to life in one of the industry’s highest-profile projects.

What the audience will learn

  • Fundamentals of the airport hotel business
  • Challenges of developing on airport mixed-use real estate
  • Adaptive reuse/historic preservation in an airport environment
  • History of the TWA Flight Center and the jet age at JFK

14:35 - 15:25

Panel discussion: Challenges of building for the future in post-pandemic times

Airport development projects are dynamic and complex due to their ever-changing needs and diverse interests of a vast group of stakeholders. This panel includes top-level executives responsible for strategizing, defining and delivering large-scale airport infrastructure projects at large hub airports. They will share their processes and lessons learned in successfully planning and delivering multi-billion-dollar development projects at their airports. They will discuss their vision on future trends and the needs of next-gen travelers, and what they are doing to stay ahead of the curve. What have been the priorities for their airports in terms of post pandemic challenges in developing airport infrastructure and building passenger confidence, as well as addressing social and climate changes in next decade.

What the audience will learn

  • Future of large-scale airport development in post pandemic environment
  • Innovation and modernization
  • Emerging trends and processes
  • How to secure a return on investment while delivering a great passenger experience at an airport
Jim Heitmann *Invited
Deputy director, aviation development
The Port Authority of NY & NJ
USA
Satyaki Raghunath
Chief strategy and development officer
Bangalore International Airport Limited
India
Thierry de Séverac
Chief officer of engineering and capital projects
Groupe ADP
France
Amit Rikhy
President and CEO
CAG Holdings LLC
USA
Panel Moderator:
Kiran Merchant, vice chairman, Merchant Aviation

15:25 - 15:45

Break

15:45

Smart airport

Loïc Briand
Managing director project expertise division - global PMO Smart Airport
Groupe ADP
France
Nicolas Vandable
Head of airline relations, airport terminal projects and development
Groupe ADP
France
Smart airport can have several meanings and answer several objectives, from customer experience to operational process optimization. As the biggest platform of Group ADP, Paris-CDG Airport is a natural and key pilot site to feed the group strategy to build the airport of the future.

What the audience will learn

  • Smart airport – what are we talking about?
  • Toward smart airport and seamless passenger processes
  • How to define a strategy at group level

16:10

The future of airports

Anthony Cozzi
Director of digital products, mobile/travel
United Airlines 
USA
Stephen Glenfield
Senior digital manager
London Heathrow Airport
UK
The world isn’t building twice as many airports but we are building twice as many planes. Airports of the future will be focused on three specific areas of growth and innovation as they adapt not only to a new set of traveler expectations but also to trends in innovation. Smarter: how can airports continue using data within their spaces to drive meaningful, omnichannel passenger experiences? Safer: how can we make the best use of our spaces so that they’re healthier for our guests? Greener: how can airports continue to fuel innovation and growth while still ensuring their operations are sustainable?

What the audience will learn

  • The shared challenges all airports face in the coming decades and how to innovate around them
  • Which technologies the most innovative airports are leveraging to enhance passenger journeys
  • How growth in geospatial data and can enhance the passenger experience

16:35

The future of airport operations by Airbus

Sebastien Lavina
Airport operations
Airbus
France
Airbus will offer views on the future of airport operations. Concepts and studies will be highlighted, aiming at describing the airport of the future and its interactions with aircraft models. The focus will also be on new energies (H2, SAF...) and innovative solutions for more environmentally friendly operations, ramp-wise and up to aircraft design. Airbus will share views with peers and experts and engage in discussions about what the future will look like and how it could drastically change the way airport operations are organized. We will be able to compare proposals and plan for further exchanges.

What the audience will learn

  • Future airport operations
  • The airport of the future
  • Concepts and studies
  • New energies and innovative solutions
  • Environmentally friendly operations

17:00

Airport future: becoming intermodality node and energy hub?

Marc Houalla
ENAC Alumni president / Groupe ADP deputy executive director / Paris CDG Airport managing director
Groupe ADP
France
Gaël Le Bris
Senior aviation planner and senior technical principal
WSP USA
USA
The European aviation community is determined to significantly reduce its carbon footprint to achieve carbon neutrality worldwide by 2050. To reach this goal and obtain a license to grow, some airports are considering developing, within the airport, an intermodality node by connecting air, railway and road transportation to service passengers, the airport community and the airport neighborhood. They are also considering becoming a hydrogen producer or provider to service the airport, aircraft operators and other airport community stakeholders. This presentation will examine these two initiatives from multiple perspectives, analyze their strengths, constraints and opportunities, and assess their feasibility.

What the audience will learn

  • How to develop your airport into an intermodality node connecting air, railway and road transportation
  • How to develop hydrogen producer or provider activity at your airport
  • The strengths, constraints, opportunities and feasibility of developing your airport into an inter-modality node connecting air, railway and road transportation
  • The strengths, constraints, opportunities and feasibility of developing hydrogen producer or provider activity at your airport

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS ceremony and celebration. Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Technovation (continued)

Day 2: Thursday, June 16

Technovation
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Catherine Mayer
Vice president
SITA
USA
Maurice Jenkins
CIO
Miami International Airport
USA
Pierre Charbonneau
Senior advisor – passenger experience
UFA
Canada
Samuel Ingalls
Principal consultant
Barich
USA

09:05

LAX experiments and learns during a crisis

Aura Moore
CIO
Los Angeles World Airports
USA
David Kipp
Vice president, technology services
Burns Engineering
USA
SARS-CoV-2 and its variants have taught us many valuable lessons about responding to a global health crisis. Leading international gateway airports like LAX have possibly learned the most and we will share some of the most important outcomes from the past two years. Highlighted observations include the value of experimentation, the intersection of human instinct and technology (evolution of touchless travel ), rapid development of international entry/exit, unintended consequences (passenger familiarity with technologies like the QR code), the rise of enabling mobile infrastructure and the acceleration of seamless travel as an experiential benefit.

What the audience will learn

  • The value of experimentation
  • Human instincts and technology in airports
  • Rapid technology development and adoption at the border
  • Unintended consequences we didn't foresee

09:30

How Toronto Pearson leveraged innovation to address the pandemic challenges

Pierre Lanthier
Director - IT strategy, innovation and business transformation
Greater Toronto Airports Authority
Canada
Dipen Ghetia
Innovation program manager
Wipro Limited
Canada
As the pandemic disrupted passenger traffic and airport operations, Toronto Pearson set up focus groups to identify innovative ways to address the challenges posed by it. The technology innovation program, which was set up before the pandemic, allowed the airport to identify challenges and opportunities and to rapidly deliver from idea to outcome. Working with its strategic IT partner, Wipro, Toronto Pearson developed various innovative solutions that not only addressed the pandemic challenges but also created an opportunity to transform the airport operations. The presentation covers the approach Toronto Pearson took along with a few innovation case studies.

What the audience will learn

  • The approach Toronto Pearson took to address pandemic challenges
  • How the technology innovation program was leveraged
  • Innovation case studies through pandemic
  • How Toronto Pearson leveraged emerging technologies such as AI, IoT, blockchain, advanced analytics, the cloud, etc to deliver innovations
  • The lessons learned

09:55

How CPH built the foundation for a smart airport ecosystem

Christian Poulsen
COO/CIO
Copenhagen Airports AS
Denmark
Mehdi Motaghiani
CEO
Smarter Airports
Denmark
After years of innovation in the airport industry we stand at a crossroad. Countless airports have experienced failed implementation projects, broken promises and smart features that don’t deliver business value. Building upon old core legacy systems will only take you part of the way. At some point the limitations will be evident if you want to become a truly data-driven, smart airport. Copenhagen Airports made a bold move in getting rid of its old core legacy system and replacing it with a modern, flexible and modular platform, enabling CPH to transition, scale and develop in sync with changing needs.

What the audience will learn

  • How CPH makes smarter, faster and proactive decisions with intelligent use of data and machine learning
  • How CPH ensures that ideas come alive in a safe and secure manner, faster than ever before
  • How CPH is leveraging its extensive domain knowledge to generate new revenue streams through commercializing and scaling
  • How CPH ensures it efficiently uses existing resources, allowing for CPH to increase throughput and raise passenger numbers significantly
  • How CPH has executed a comprehensive and robust transition plan, mitigating risks on multiple levels – technical, organizational and financial

10:20

Bringing together the digital foundations of tomorrow – smart airport

David Krieff
Deputy CIO
Groupe ADP
France
Smart airport strategy must orchestrate modern technologies (wi-fi, LTE, cloud, machine learning, data analysis, IoT, video analysis, etc) in a meaningful way, to improve the passenger experience and overall operations efficiency.

What the audience will learn

  • how does smart airport translates in digital solutions
  • how are we orchestrating digital infrastructures & services in the framework of smart airport
  • Examples of services and how they contribute to the various stages of smart airports

10:45 - 11:05

Break

11:05

Virtual queuing – a game-changer for airports

Kasper Hounsgaard
CEO
Copenhagen Optimization
Denmark
Virtual queuing allows a passenger to book a slot for passing through security, checking in bags or any other touchpoint in the passenger journey. The passenger can do this either before coming to the airport or at the airport. Virtual queuing was initially piloted at scale at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport over summer 2020 with significant, positive results. Following Seattle, multiple airports have adopted virtual queuing. In this presentation, we share the main lessons from virtual queuing at airports and provide an outlook for the future.

What the audience will learn

  • How passengers are expressing extremely high satisfaction rates with virtual queuing
  • How virtual queuing can be an enabler for the personalized airport journey
  • How virtual queuing has helped to reduce security checkpoint peaks by 26%
  • How virtual queuing can be implemented and impactful in just four weeks
  • How virtual queuing has the potential to change the way a passenger travels through the airport

11:30 - 12:30

Panel discussion: Digital, digitization and digitalization!

As significant centers of economic activity in every major community around the world, modern airports are also hubs of mass-scale digital activity. From information collection, processing and dissemination to cybersecurity, e-commerce, predictive analytics and complex information processing, airports’ digital activity is unlimited. This session brings together airport tech leaders to discuss the airport’s digital transformation; the future airport digital ecosystem; real industry-level programs aimed at creating the foundations of digital technovation at airports.

What the audience will learn

  • How airports are making better business decisions through digitalization
  • Smart data hubs and their transformational impact at airports
  • Initiatives to keep data safe and secure
  • Leveraging industry programs to help airports on their digital transformation journeys
Eric Schneckenberger
Group CIO
Vinci Airports
France
Sjoerd Blüm
CIO
Royal Schiphol Group
Netherlands
Martin Rogal
Head of development technologies
Munich Airport
Germany
Maurice Jenkins
CIO
Miami International Airport
USA
Panel Moderator:
Catherine Mayer, vice president, SITA

12:30 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

Airport 4.0 enabled by private wireless communication

Bruno Tourwé
ICT commercial framework and acquisition manager
Brussels Airport Company
Belgium
Richard van Wijk
Global aviation practice lead
Nokia
Netherlands
Airport digitalization allows paperless operations, enhancement of operational and situational awareness, improved sustainability and cost reduction. The journey to Airport 4.0 is challenging. It calls for innovative wireless communications with guaranteed connectivity and mobility that airport applications will depend on. Connectivity is now a strategic asset - as important as the runway. Pervasive, reliable, secure, broadband wireless connectivity is critical in Airport 4.0. Once the private wireless network is present, the possibilities are endless. The presentation will focus on LTE/5G private wireless technology and example airport use cases utilized to enhance airport operations, with real-life learnings and a case study of airport deployment.

What the audience will learn

  • Information and data related to airport digitalization - content reviewed, refined and updated to provide the current position
  • What are airports are doing to take advantage of innovative digital and connectivity technologies
  • Recent use cases: how private wireless helps improve the overall airport experience for operations and passengers
  • LTE/5G technologies, business models and spectrum options
  • Airport case study – the experience at Brussels Airport, containing the most up-to-date information from the project

14:10

5G-based airport use cases in action

Nikolaos Papagiannopoulos
Senior project manager
Athens International Airport
Greece
The presentation will cover real-life practical implementations of airport 5G use cases to support airport operations, focussing on three distinct 5G use cases from Athens International Airport in the areas of airport/apron operations, massive 5G IoT deployment for car parking areas and a use case for passenger location-based and wayfinding services in emergency situations. Additionally, further possible application areas of 5G at airport environments will be examined, while the characteristics of the different 5G business and deployment models at an airport environment will be analyzed. These use cases have been carefully selected to test the advanced capabilities of 5G networks.

What the audience will learn

  • Innovative use cases for airports based on 5G mobile networks
  • Methodology to dimension 5G use cases
  • Benefits of using 5G in an airport environment

14:35 - 15:30

Panel discussion: What is the ‘OnGo Alliance’?

Panel discussion moderated by Maurice Jenkins to discuss the purpose and mission of the OnGo Alliance and how OnGo technology and use cases benefit the aviation community.

What the audience will learn

  • What OnGo is
  • How it benefits airports
  • The integral role OnGo plays in digital transformation
  • Deployment considerations
  • Airport use cases (MIA/ORD/MSP/MSY)
Eduardo Valencia
Chief information officer
Minneapolis-St. Paul Metropolitan Airports Commission
USA
Johan Bjorklund
Chief executive officer
Betacom
USA
Michael Zeto
Chief commercial officer
Boingo Wireless
USA
Niren Choudhury
Senior director, business development - aviation, North America
Nokia
USA
Samuel Ingalls
Principal consultant
Barich
USA
Panel Moderators:
Maurice Jenkins, Chief Information Officer, Miami Dade Aviation Department
Maurice Jenkins, CIO, Miami International Airport

15:30 - 15:50

Break

15:50

Digital transformation in asset management

Damian Ives
Director of operations
Leeds Bradford Airport Company
UK
Colin Smith
Managing director
Air Partner CHS Ltd
UK
Recent advances in IoT, coupled with cost reduction in a competitive market, have made it cost-effective for airports to use sensors to detect developing failure that is missed by the human eye. This presentation will describe a 5-stage approach for implementing digital transformation in asset management and how IoT sensors complement the existing maintenance regime to bring about the next wave of business efficiency for airports. A case study on how Leeds Bradford Airport benefitted from the successful implementation and the failures that were prevented will be shared.

What the audience will learn

  • Approach for implementing digital transformation in asset management
  • How IoT sensors complement the existing maintenance regime
  • How Leeds Bradford Airport benefitted from digital transformation in asset management

16:15

BHS born digital for a sustainable future

Idar Sørgjerd
Head of baggage handling
Avinor Oslo Airport
Norway
Per Engelbrechtsen
Business development director
Beumer Group
Denmark
At Oslo Airport, a new terminal is set out to be born digital with the airport's development strategy to ‘future-proof’ operations. This led the airport to choose a baggage handling system technology that enables forward-thinking operations based on data-driven decisions. With years of hands-on experience from using data analytics in BHS optimization, the airport will uncover how to avoid the typical operational performance traps and show how data analytics impacts on human behavior, processes, infrastructure and undetected deterioration. In the second part, the airport's data and systems partner will give insights to what the next steps are within data analytics.

What the audience will learn

  • First-hand experience with data analytics for baggage handling systems
  • Finding the sweet spot for the BHS team, tools and system
  • Data analytics from three different organizational perspectives
  • How data analytics changes an organization
  • The next steps in data analytics

16:40

Transforming the bag room through innovation

Darin Juby
Director, airport operations - baggage services
Toronto Pearson Airport
Canada
Mark Stokes
SmartSuite business unit manager
Brock Solutions Inc
Canada
This presentation will examine how Toronto Pearson International Airport (YYZ), in concert with a large international airline, was able to dramatically transform its bag room operation through the deployment of innovative new technologies. From deploying new, more informative pier displays, to an automated alternative to traditional manual encoding, to providing a single centralized monitoring solution for the entire airport, YYZ has redefined the bag room in exciting ways, radically improving performance system wide. Representatives from YYZ and Brock will provide an overview of each solution and will explain the benefits for both the airport and the airline.

What the audience will learn

  • An overview of each solution, explaining the deployment process and benefits for both the airport and its airline users
  • The benefits of a single centralized monitoring solution for airports and airlines, aggregating data from multiple disparate systems
  • The reaction from airport and airline users, and information about the adoption of these new technologies

17:05

Baggage handling systems of the future

Scott Goodwin
Assistant director airport operations BHS/GSE
Greater Orlando Airport Authority
USA
Juan Carlos Arteaga
Vice president
HNTB Corporation
USA
Baggage handling systems (BHS) are critical to successful and efficient airport operations. The selection of proper BHS technology that will provide the most reliable, efficient and secure conveyance of bags is an absolute necessity. And ensuring that the design, construction, operations and maintenance will fully satisfy the airport’s needs must be carefully orchestrated. Orlando’s growth has dramatically exceeded forecasts. To meet demand, GOAA began a public procurement protocol in 2015 to select the design, construction and manufacturing team for an RFID (aka ICS) BHS system, which provides 100% tracking, eliminates international and domestic bag separation, minimizes jams and improves hygiene.

What the audience will learn

  • The process of selecting the BHS DBOM Team
  • The technical aspects of preparing the Design Criteria Package for all manufacturers
  • The most important aspects of a robust, reliable and efficient BHS
  • The best method to design, procure and install a BHS
  • Key success factors in delivering the BHS system through collaboration among the Terminal Designers, DBOM BHS Team and Construction

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS Ceremony and Celebration! Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Airport design, planning and development (continued)

Day 3: Friday, June 17

Airport design, planning and development
09:00 - 13:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Tim Walder
Senior director and aviation sector leader
Arcadis
UK
Prof David Holm
Architect director
Cox Architecture
Australia

09:05

Reorganization of terminals 2B and 2D

Rachid El Moussaoui
Lead architect
Groupe ADP
France
Thimotée Berger
Architect, deputy head of architecture and design department
Groupe ADP
France
The presentation will cover Groupe ADP's renovation of Terminal 2B and expansion of the airside for the separation of international passenger processing: departures and arrivals; the creation of a link building between 2B and 2D to pool the functions of controls, baggage delivery, shopping areas and lounges; the complete redevelopment of the link module (Module L) with retail spaces; and the complete energy renovation of buildings (envelopes and facades, fluid technical installations, HVAC, etc).

What the audience will learn

  • Architectural ambition
  • Renovation of emblematic existing terminals
  • The passenger process
  • BIM methods
  • Communication

09:30

The revamping of Milan Linate Airport

Alessandro Fidato
Chief operating officer
SEA Milan Airports
Italy
In June 2021, Linate Airport inaugurated its restyling after important revamping works that began in 2019 and have completely renovated the Milan city airport. The project has involved architectural and functional refurbishment with a substantial change in passenger flows in a considerable part of the existing terminal (including check-in, security and duty-free areas) – 5,400 square meters – together with the building of a new three-story building (Corpo F) – 10,000 square meters – with a new shopping gallery and a new food court with a total investment of €40m including relevant technological innovation, such as SEA face boarding.

What the audience will learn

  • Iconic – design an authentic Milanese experience through furniture and shopping
  • Technology – touchless journey through digitalization for a safer and faster security experience
  • Sustainability – energy saving, health and well-being of users, waste management and environmental pollution

09:55

Helsinki Airport Development Program – Passenger Terminal Processor Capacity Simulation

Sami Kiiskinen
Vice president - airport development
Helsinki Airport, Finavia Corporation
Finland
Piet Ringersma
Senior airport architect
NACO, Netherlands Airport Consultants
Netherlands
The most extensive expansion project in the history of Helsinki Airport will finish in 2023. Finavia’s giant investment program allows the airport to serve 30 million passengers annually. The expansion program includes an increase in terminal capacity to accommodate future growth. Successful discussion on terminal capacity between the airport and airlines requires a simulation approach to discuss various terminal design layouts and what-if scenarios on different allocation strategies. The presentation will show how we conducted terminal simulations for various scenarios to showcase the terminal capacity, which facilitated the seamless discussion between Finavia and the airlines at Helsinki.

What the audience will learn

  • Insight into the development of the Helsinki Airport Development Program
  • Challenges faced in airport capacity discussions
  • Various approaches to undertake terminal capacity assessments
  • Implementation of the terminal simulation approach
  • Understanding the terminal simulation as a tool for stakeholder discussion

10:20

Collecting data for digital twin creation at Prague Airport

Daniel Šmejkal
Head of VDC
Prague Airport
Czech Republic
Sascha Kuehner
Director of sales
Revizto
Switzerland
Prague airport took the Covid-19 lockdown as an opportunity to map its existing terminal buildings and create digital twins. The airport collected data in the field and kept this organized for easy further processing.

What the audience will learn

  • Digital twin creation using historical drawings and ‘as build information’
  • Combining point clouds, BIM models and drawings
  • Digital collaboration from the design in the construction and the operation
  • How to report on all project tasks in one platform
  • How an integrated collaboration platform can help transform your airport business

10:45

When geodata ‘paves’ the road to airports’ design and planning

Eva Tsiliakou
Senior project manager for corporate strategy and digitalization, strategy lead sustainability
Fraport Greece
Greece
The aviation industry and airport authorities' interest in safe and operative airports is continually growing. Safety enhancement in aviation constitutes smooth airport operations, which are the essence of each operator's concern. Airports are living organisms continuously evolving, transforming and expanding as required by capacity and traffic forecast needs. Planning airport operations and facilities (airside, landside and terminal), short term or long term should encompass operations needs and serve commercial aspects, which should all be aligned with safety requirements, fully comply with EASA regulations and face the many challenges and risks the endless airfield entails.

What the audience will learn

  • The investigation of these challenges is based on topographic data. Nowadays ge information is provided by state-of-the-art tools
  • Presentation of the Fraport Greece experience with geodata applied when planning and design face airside challenges
  • Looking back to the challenging 5-year period of the imminent works (2017-2021), there are many lessons learned
  • Airport geographic information has assisted Fraport Greece in decision making and in complex design studies with long-term impact
  • In the 5th year of concession and towards future works, Fraport Greece plans new aerial surveys and new obstacle assessments

11:10 - 11:25

Break

11:25

Leveraging modular construction to lower costs and elevate passenger experiences

Mohamed Charkas
Airport development SVP
DFW International Airport
USA
Matt Needham
Director of aviation and transportation
HOK
USA
Major airport construction projects can present significant operational challenges that impact cost, schedules and the passenger experience. Modular construction methods may be the solution for smoother, cleaner and less disruptive construction. By maximizing preassembled materials and unitized components for airport facilities, everything from concourses to restrooms and concession units could be designed and assembled offsite and quickly swapped out for upgraded units throughout the life of the facility. This approach minimizes disruptions to airport operations, offers more opportunities for the labor market, reduces trade overlap and provides heightened efficiency and construction safety.

What the audience will learn

  • The evolution of offsite construction methods in airport design
  • Examples of modular construction concepts currently in the works with airports
  • The benefits of modular construction, including minimized disruptions to airport operations, schedule advantages, heightened efficiencies, labor market opportunities and more

11:50

Building a new terminal while in flight

Heather Leide
Director, airport development
Metropolitan Airports Commission
USA
Kerry Bruggemann
Principal of sales
Michaud Cooley Erickson
USA
Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport (MSP) is designing a new terminal without relocating. With only a 15ft expansion and a new parking ramp, MSP is completing a US$1bn renovation and expansion, reinventing the entire facility. During construction, MSP has hosted some of the largest events – the Super Bowl, Final Four and PGA tournaments – while looking to reinvent the building as simply and efficiently as possible within its 1960s framework. The MSP director of airport development and Michaud Cooley Erickson MEP principal are excited to present the unique collaboration to make this all happen and enlighten the audience with best practices learned.

What the audience will learn

  • MSP utilized staff, volunteers and consultants to integrate with passengers, creating the most welcoming and friendly experience amid the construction
  • MSP integrated many unique technologies including blast mitigation, hearing loops, HVAC upgrades and plumbing water savings to execute this project
  • During this program, MSP increased passenger flow and optimized vertical circulation to make the passenger experience seamless
  • The program created a synergy of services (restrooms, concessions, etc), consolidating and combining the baggage claim and ticket lobby
  • Increasing passengers meant increases in parking. MSP built a state-of-the-art parking ramp to help improve the passenger experience

12:15

Cargo apron rehabilitation at an operationally intensive facility

Eli Shporn
Airport project engineer
Israel Airport Authority (IAA)
Israel
Lyor Dahan
Director of airport planning
DY Consultants
USA
Apron Bravo is the main cargo apron at Ben Gurion Tel Aviv International Airport. It recently underwent a massive rehabilitation program and stands reconfiguration to accommodate aircraft up to the B747-8. Because of its location on the airport, and the crucial role it plays in the system, it was paramount to provide phasing plans to minimize disruption of cargo operations. Parking and operational plans for each phase of the program were prepared. Constant coordination with cargo operators, tenants, ground handling agents, contractors' representatives and airport staff were needed throughout the project to deliver the product on time and on budget.

What the audience will learn

  • Challenges associated with construction on an operationally intensive facility
  • Lessons learned and recommendations to ensure a successful project delivery
  • Testing and commissioning the ramp towards delivery. An ORAT of its own
  • Not to underestimate the need for detailed interim parking and operations plans for each phase
  • To avoid planning to minimum standards

12:40

ACI/ACC/AGC Airport Owners’ Guide to Project Delivery Systems , 3rd edition

Christopher Oswald
Senior vice president, safety & regulatory affairs
Airports Council International-North America
USA
Steve Riano
Global aviation division manager
Bechtel Corporation
USA
The ACI/ACC/AGC Airport Owners’ Guide to Project Delivery Systems was developed in 2006 and updated in 2012 by a joint committee of the Airports Council International-North America (ACI-NA), Airport Consultants Council (ACC) and the Associated General Contractors of America (AGC). The Guide assists airport owners with making appropriate delivery method decisions; development professionals with supporting the owner’s project delivery role; and procurement practitioners in executing contracting processes. The recently completed 3rd Edition of the Guide includes updates to address new developments since 2012, with particular emphasis on significant changes to the industry as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic.

What the audience will learn

  • Review of project delivery systems and procurement methods definitions, including Design-Bid-Build, Construction Management at-Risk and Traditional/Progressive Design-Build.
  • Selection of the appropriate project delivery system, including ability to use alternative systems, risk exposure and shifting roles/responsibilities
  • Implementation of the chosen project delivery system, including owner resources readiness, contract types, contract language, and Covid-19 contract implications
  • Financing of the chosen project delivery system, including linking financing to project delivery and innovative financing such as PPP
  • Emerging trends shaping project delivery systems decisions including alternative contracting methods and technologies/processes to assist with project delivery

13:05 - 15:00

Lunch

Airport design, planning and development – Middle East and Asia

Day 3: Friday, June 17

Airport design, planning and development – Middle East and Asia
09:00 - 13:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Ashwini Thorat
Head of design and planning
Noida International Airport
India
Satyaki Raghunath
Chief strategy and development officer
Bangalore International Airport Limited
India

09:05

MATAR’s dual airport operations strategy for FIFA World Cup Qatar

Ioannis Metsovitis
Senior vice president operations
Hamad International Airport (MATAR)
Qatar
MATAR, running the operational and management functions of Qatar’s two airports: Hamad International Airport (HIA) and Doha International Airport (DIA), will make history as a single airport operator welcoming the majority of FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 visitors, linking football fans to stadiums and football games across Qatar. It is prepared to provide its visitors with a smooth travel experience and ensure operational efficiency. This presentation will explain how MATAR has prepared to achieve this feat through stakeholder collaboration, a multiphased HIA expansion project, refurbishment projects and various procedural enhancements, to ultimately deliver a World Cup like no other.

What the audience will learn

  • The significance of MATAR being the single airport operator welcoming the majority of World Cup Qatar 2022 visitors
  • MATAR’s strategy for dual airport operations at DOH and DIA during world cup passenger peak including procedural enhancements and refurbishments
  • HIA’s airport expansion: added services and facilities at the world-class airport and its impact on World Cup visitor capacity
  • How MATAR will ensure operational efficiency and readiness for the occasion by working hand-in-hand with airport stakeholders and event organizers
  • MATAR’s plans to handle different passenger groups in line with World Cup requirements

09:30

Bahrain Airport – challenges, strategy and success

Mohamed Al Binfalah
Chief executive officer
Bahrain Airport Company
Bahrain
Operations were transferred seamlessly to Bahrain International Airport’s (BIA) new passenger terminal on 28 January 2021, positioning BIA as the most modern boutique airport in the region. The move is part of the Airport Modernization Program (AMP), one of the most important national development projects in Bahrain’s history. Ahead of the transfer, Bahrain Airport Company and its partners successfully completed the National Operations Readiness and Airport Transfer (ORAT) program, paving the way for a smooth transition despite the challenges of COVID-19. The second phase of the AMP includes the launch of a new private aviation terminal that will enhance level of service provided to VIPs, business leaders, and private jet owners traveling through BIA. This phase also includes the launch of a fuel farm complex that will position Bahrain as a prominent and sophisticated aviation fuel services hub in the region.

What the audience will learn

  • BIA's success story in transferring the operation seamlessly
  • The main strategic points in building a boutique airport
  • Overcoming challenges during Covid-19

09:55 - 11:10

Panel discussion: Airports – growth and development - the way forward

The panel will discuss the challenges and performance of airports in the region during/post-pandemic and how the region led global recovery, as well as the key trends affecting airport passenger terminal processing and growth, the impact of Covid-19 on operations, airport development plans, strategies employed to boost passenger confidence, new health requirements and ways to spur traffic activity.

What the audience will learn

  • Airport crisis and pandemic management
  • Airport capacity rationalization
  • Bringing non-standard stakeholders – such as health, medical, vaccine – into the aviation ecosystem
  • Digital credentials and innovation
  • Travel passes
Aimen Ahmed Al Hosni
CEO
Oman Airports
Oman
Mohamed Al Binfalah
Chief executive officer
Bahrain Airport Company
Bahrain
Mohammed Al-mowkley
CEO
Matarat Holding
Saudi Arabia
Panel Moderator:
Kashif Khalid, regional director - Middle East and Africa, IATA

11:10 - 11:25

Break

11:25

Regional connectivity scheme, with a particular focus on India

Nandita Bhatt
Airport director, Udaipur Airport - GM architect
Airports Authority of India (AAI)
India
As the Indian economy grows, consumption-led growth in populated metros is expected to spill over to hinterland areas. This is also expected to be due to production becoming more expensive in the densely populated metro cities. In this scenario, air connectivity can provide the required impetus to the economic growth of regional centers. In this context, one of the key objectives of NCAP 2016 is to ‘establish an integrated ecosystem that will lead to significant growth of the civil aviation sector’.

What the audience will learn

  • Geographical spread: how the vast country is connecting various regions
  • Collaborations: government, state governments, operators and airlines
  • Giving new meaning to air connectivity; minimum cost
  • Resource management: using existing airstrips; upgrading or revival
  • Employment generator

11:50

Development of airports in second-tier cities in India

Janhavi Poul
Deputy general manager
Adani Airports Holdings
India
This presentation will cover the development of airports in Tier 2 cities in India with upcoming project examples. The presentation will highlight the technological challenges and the development of these airports in terms of traffic diversions from major airports and commercial modeling to attract traffic, in addition to highlighting how digital technology innovations and dual airport strategy will promote a sustainable approach for these airports.

What the audience will learn

  • A sustainable approach for designing smaller airports
  • Dual use of small airports
  • Green terminal design - eco design
  • Commercial/retail modeling for the small airport
  • Use of technological innovation in the smaller airport

12:15

Noida International Airport: where Indian hospitality meets Swiss efficiency

Oliver Hebeisen
Design manager terminal
Noida International Airport (NIA)
Germany
Andrew Thomas
Partner
Grimshaw Architects
UK
The most populous state in India, Uttar Pradesh, is exemplified by lush green landscapes, outdoor living and vibrant, colorful, cultural and retail experiences. When the Zurich Airport-led team commenced work on Delhi Noida’s new airport they had a simple but bold ambition – to create a new airport that would be the perfect synthesis of Indian hospitality with Swiss efficiency, placing passenger and visitor comfort and well-being at the heart of the airport experience. Discover from senior leaders of the team how this vision has come to life in the design of India’s latest private airport development

What the audience will learn

  • Collaborative global working on a unique, net zero energy airport terminal which responds to local culture and identity
  • Placing people first by making all passenger journeys clear, intuitive and convenient with integrated digital technologies that ease passenger stress
  • Sense of place – a celebration of the green, lush environment of Noida through the exploration of landscaping and internal biophilia
  • A vibrant and colorful commercial environment which includes a covered forecourt for arriving and departing passengers and visitors alike
  • Dispensing with the traditional landside arrival and departures ‘two-level viaduct’ approach, reimagining the relationship between the terminal and vehicular access

12:40

Kaohsiung International Airport new terminal – Taiwan's southern gateway

Chun-Yuo Chen
Section chief, aerodrome engineering division
Civil Aeronautics Administration, Ministry of Transportation and Communications, Taiwan
Taiwan
David Lee
Director of international affairs
JJP Architects & Planners
Taiwan
Kaohsiung International Airport (KHH) is about to undergo its most ambitious transformation since completion. The new masterplan calls for the replacement of the existing international and domestic terminals with a new, state-of-the-art passenger terminal, three concourses and a ground transportation center, totaling over 240,000m2 of floor area, all under one undulating roof. The design emphasizes sustainability and resilience along with a focus on passenger experience to create a distinct sense of place. Construction will be in two phases in order to meet the challenge of keeping the airport in operation during construction.

What the audience will learn

  • Overview of the new terminal project
  • Design highlights of the terminal
  • How the project will be constructed while the airport remains operational

13:05

Terminal 3 expansion at Narita Airport

Yusuke Kato
Senior manager
Narita International Airport Corporation
Japan
Terminal 3 is the dedicated LCC terminal at Narita Airport, which opened in 2015 with a capacity of 7.5 million passengers a year. The steady growth of the LCC market in Japan has caused severe congestion at T3. It has been decided to expand the terminal to double the capacity and enhance the passenger experience with the concept of the LCC terminal. The access walkway from Terminal 2 will be replaced by a wider and safer corridor and the distance between the terminals will be shortened. The passenger experience will be improved dramatically by introducing a hold baggage screening system, self-bag-drop equipment and smart security.

What the audience will learn

  • How to expand the existing terminal
  • The enhanced passenger experience at the LCC terminal
  • The latest information on Narita Airport

13:30 - 15:00

Lunch

Airport management and recovery

Day 3: Friday, June 17

Airport management and recovery
09:00 - 13:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Sujata Suri
Vice president strategy and commercial development
Hamad International Airport (MATAR)
Qatar

09:05 - 09:45

Panel discussion: Balancing stakeholder relationships during Covid recovery

Collaboration is key to aid recovery from the pandemic. This session will take a close look at the key factors integrated into balancing stakeholder relationships to drive forward the common goal of providing the best experiences and outcomes for customers. There will also be a glance at the general topic of customer experience and how agile the management of CX had to be during 2020 and 2021 to adapt to the changing needs of customers.

What the audience will learn

  • Balancing the needs of all stakeholders through the transition
  • How to take the guesswork out of what passengers want
  • Re-building confidence in travel with passengers
  • Examples of unique customer experience initiatives
  • How the pandemic has accelerated change in customer experience management
Kathy Haley
Chief customer experience officer – aviation
Port Authority of New York and New Jersey
USA
Claire Donnellan
Director
Customer Centric Consulting
Australia
Panel Moderator:
Sevda Fevzi, associate, customer experience and business development, Modalis Infrastructure Partners Inc.

09:45

BLQ vs Covid-19: lessons learned from an ‘antifragile’ experience

Nazareno Ventola
CEO and MD
Aeroporto G. Marconi di Bologna SpA
Italy
The presentation will discuss Bologna Airport's experience of fighting the Covid-19 battle and envisioning the future: ‘from resilience to an antifragile experience’.

What the audience will learn

  • A successful airport story
  • Then came the storm
  • Resilience is not enough

10:15

A conversation on leadership

Candace McGraw
CEO
CVG Airport
USA
Roelof-Jan (RJ) Steenstra
President and CEO
Fort McMurray International Airport
Canada
A discussion between Candace McGraw, CEO of CVG Airport, and RJ Steenstra, CEO of Fort McMurray Airport. Leading successful teams requires committed, transparent leadership. A culture that embraces the need for adaptation results in a business that can survive fires, dehubbing, financial struggles - and even pandemics.

What the audience will learn

  • A Conversation on Leadership: a fireside discussion between Candace McGraw, CEO of CVG Airport, and RJ Steenstra, CEO of Fort McMurray Airport.
  • Leading successful teams requires committed, transparent servant leadership.
  • A culture that embraces the need for adaptation results in a business that can survive fires, dehubbing, financial struggles—and even pandemics.

10:45 - 11:05

Break

11:05

Facilities management as a strategy for resiliency, sustainability and pandemic recovery

Mike Tasker
Senior manager for facilities and infrastructure
Port of Seattle
USA
David Tomber
Director, strategic consulting
Woolpert
USA
This session will focus on facilities management as a strategy for resiliency, sustainability and pandemic recovery. It will cover the following key themes: resiliency planning for critical infrastructure; sustainability, including HVAC systems and technologies for air exchange, filters, building controls and analytics, air purification technologies, and energy considerations; virtual queuing and physical distancing tools; touchless technologies, including creative, less expensive solutions; and pandemic recovery, health testing, documents checks, facility evolution, and preparation for future shocks to the aviation industry.

What the audience will learn

  • Resiliency planning for critical infrastructure, looking holistically at potential shocks and stresses
  • HVAC systems and technologies for air exchange, filters, building controls and analytics, air purification technologies, and energy considerations
  • Innovative approaches to virtual queuing, physical distancing and touchless technologies while maintaining a high level of service for passengers
  • Pandemic recovery, health testing, document checks, facility evolution, and preparation for future shocks to the aviation industry
  • Facility evolution, including shifting non-essential facilities outside the terminal and space reallocation

11:35

Adaptation and innovation in airports as a response to pandemics

Eva Valenzuela Marti
Deputy COO
Groupe ADP
France
Due to the great impact that the Covid-19 crisis has had on the airport sector, the aim of the presentation is to show, based on the experience within the ADP group, how to adapt the operation of airports to comply with all health regulations and protect our passengers and workers. This has been done by using innovative tools to minimize the impact on airport operations and the quality of service with which we welcome our passengers. One of the lessons learned has been the construction of a health network including all the group's airports.

What the audience will learn

  • The impact of the pandemic on the airport operations
  • How to adapt the airport operations to all the new sanitary measures
  • How to build a sanitary network including all the airports of the group

12:00

Applying 9/11 aviation security lessons learnt to Covid-19 recovery

Nathalie Herbelles
Senior director, security and facilitation
Airports Council International
Canada
Ashley Reeve
Aviation advisory
Arup
UK
For aviation, the response to the Covid-19 pandemic has been the same as that triggered by 9/11 – the imposition of prescribed, disproportionate to risk, one-size-fits-all measures with adverse impacts on operations. As the industry recovers, it is imperative that the shift to a risk-based approach is made now and that health authorities do not make the same mistakes as the security authorities. We will speak about the ten lessons learned from the security experience that airports and health authorities should apply for Covid-19 industry recovery and sustainable and sensible health risk management in aviation.

What the audience will learn

  • Five security lessons learned that should be applied in airports for Covid-19 recovery and long-term health risk management
  • Five security lessons learned that health authorities should adopt for Covid-19 recovery and long-term health risk management in aviation
  • How aviation health authorities can avoid making the same mistakes it has taken aviation security 20 years to learn from
  • A risk-based approach provides business benefits beyond health and security outcomes
  • The Covid-19 pandemic response has been the same as that triggered by 9/11 – it’s not good

12:30 - 13:20

Panel discussion: What have we learned from Covid-19 and how are we continuing to adapt?

We will discuss what has been learned from the pandemic so far, how it has affected different areas of airport operations and how passenger behaviors have changed. How airport and airlines are continuing to adapt and apply lessons learned during recovery. What the continuing challenges are and how they are being addressed going forward.
Panelists to be announced
Na1
Panel Moderator:
Sujata Suri, vice president strategy and commercial development, Hamad International Airport (MATAR)

13:20 - 14:00

Lunch

Customer service and passenger experience (continued)

Day 3: Friday, June 17

Customer service and passenger experience
09:00 - 13:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Brian Engle
Director of customer experience
Greater Orlando Aviation Authority
USA
Rick Belliotti
Director, customer experience design and innovation
San Diego County Regional Airport Authority
USA

09:05

Momentum grounded: why airports need a new passenger experience playbook

Joël Couillandeau
CEO
Merchant Aviation / Groupe ADP
USA
Geoffrey Ax
Americas aviation practice leader
Populous
USA
The fundamentals of airport placemaking have changed. Sure, meeting passengers’ basic needs is still crucial, but today’s travelers expect more. Their dollars demand it. They won’t pay for inauthentic experiences. They crave a taste of the city that lies just beyond landside, a glimpse of what it’s like to be a part of the hometown team. So maybe it’s time we stopped looking at them as passengers and started seeing them as fans. Airports should borrow qualities from the best stadiums and arenas that make them magnetic draws in the first place. Find out how, with two international case studies.

What the audience will learn

  • What airports can learn from the most cherished gathering places in sports when it comes to urban design and activation
  • How to put underutilized space to work to delight your customers and give them a welcome distraction from their worries
  • The first steps in auditing an airport’s existing experience and learning more about its customer base
  • How to de-stress the airport environment and prime your customers to spend on worthwhile experiences
  • How to customize this new experience: a comparative US/European airport operator’s perspective

09:30

PDX Next: keeping the heart and soul of America’s best airport

Vince Granato
Chief projects officer
Port of Portland
USA
Sharron van der Meulen
Partner
ZGF Architects
USA
How do you improve an airport so beloved that passengers write poems and songs about it? Consistently hailed as ‘America's Best Airport’, Portland International Airport is increasing capacity by 65% to accommodate 35 million passengers over the next two decades. A series of transformative projects will consolidate 80 years of expansion and renovation into one floorplate while doubling the main terminal’s footprint to deliver more fun, more food and more flow. Amid this future growth and a current pandemic, learn how PDX is maintaining its uniquely curated local character cherished by passengers and employees alike.

What the audience will learn

  • Understand what it means to design for a distinct regional identity via passenger journey mapping
  • Integration of local, sustainable materials to create a sense of place while also reducing carbon footprint
  • Use of daylight, biophilia and sightlines as well as local amenities to create moments of comfort to reduce traveler stress
  • How to create an equitable passenger journey for all travelers
  • Design, engineering and construction considerations to minimize passenger disruption and keep PDX fully operational

09:55

Flipping the customer journey; preparing for a post-pandemic passenger

Kurush Minocher
Director, passenger programs and marketing communications
Greater Toronto Airports Authority
Canada
Gelare Danaie
President
DEXD
Canada
The priority of airports after the pandemic is to continue to design healthy environments, but this sometimes affects the passenger’s experience. We need to take a step back and rethink how our customers feel in our airports. Today we need to design buildings that comfort passengers and reassure them of their safety and health. Toronto Pearson is working with DEXD to rethink the customer journey. We believe in a holistic, human-centered approach of merging technology with the built environment. We want to share our creative ideas on a journey that can help not only the customer but also airports recover.

What the audience will learn

  • We prioritize customer experience and examine all the touchpoints in four pillars of services: amenities, activation and art
  • We will share our out-of-the-box vision to merge virtual or physical services and amenities
  • We will present fresh ideas around partnerships and innovative activation and how airports can benefit financially from these experiences
  • We will share our design thinking and co-creation approach to rethink the airport environment
  • We use art and culture and bring a sense of place to elevate the customer experience

10:20 - 11:05

Panel discussion: Towards unearthing subconscious drivers of passenger experience

The whole customer experience measurement industry is moving towards leveraging AI to design an experience that matters. PathosAI, a Canadian AI company, has developed tools that unearth emotions, their drivers and the context in which they occur, from what customers say, how they say it and how they move. In this panel discussion we will discuss why the airports and the broader travel industry need to shift towards unearthing emotions and designing the customer experience around that understanding. We will also present the outcomes of the award-winning project conducted by Athens International Airport together with PathosAI.

What the audience will learn

  • The latest developments in passenger experience measurement
  • How an airport has deployed AI in a real-world scenario
  • What the learnings were that others in the industry can leverage
  • Outcome insights from the project
Ioanna Papadopoulou
Director, communications and marketing
Athens International Airport SA
Greece
George Karamanos
Managing director
KPI Aviation Marketing Solutions
United Arab Emirates
Panel Moderator:
Sumair Sayani, founder and CEO, PathosAI

11:05 - 11:25

Break

11:25

BWI – ‘easy come easy go’ but wish to stay

Paul Shank
Chief engineer
MAA/BWI Airport
USA
Chirantan Mukhopadhyay
Aviation director
Hill International
USA
Customer services are at the core of ‘easy come easy go’ – the motto of Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall (BWI) airport. Through sustainable development, BWI creates a user-friendly ambiance for customers of tomorrow and beyond. This paper demonstrates how technological innovation has enhanced the passenger journey to the level where customers linger. Examples include a children’s play area, open-air lounge, art gallery and museum, fitness centers with showers, sleeping/working rental space, spa services, smart restrooms, an in-terminal hotel and other amenities. It also highlights how ‘lessons learned’ became a driving force for sustainable solutions in the passenger journey.

What the audience will learn

  • How to turn around negative comments from surveys into innovative design
  • How to utilize effective space design with a customer service focus
  • How to embrace technology to improve the passenger journey
  • How to focus on passenger experience during optimal design scenarios
  • How minor details can improve passenger experience and reduce stress

11:50

Next-generation support for self-service passenger technology at Heathrow Airport

Janie Lee
Senior technology business partner
Heathrow Airport Ltd
UK
Bruce Harbour
Head of global support
ICM Airport Technics, an Amadeus company
Australia
Traditional reactive support models are no longer fit for purpose in a world where we see widespread adoption of passenger self-service. Heathrow Airport will discuss its approach to transitioning to a next-generation support model, which has enabled it to focus purely on passenger service while relying on the service provider to provide end-to-end management of the passenger processing technology.

What the audience will learn

  • Lessons learned: how next-generation support has transformed Heathrow's focus from technology to passengers
  • Benefits to airports and airlines from next-generation support
  • Why traditional support models are inadequate in the new self-service era
  • An in-depth look at the essential elements of next-generation support
  • Future roadmap of next-generation support

12:15

Express customer service curbside for passengers with carry-on only luggage

Jeff Siddle
Vice president of planning and development
Tampa International Airport - Hillsborough County Airport Authority
USA
Allison Hawk
Aviation architect
HNTB Corporation
USA
This session describes how Tampa International Airport has opened an innovative new express curbside/terminal system that allows passengers with only carry-on luggage to choose an express curbside that provides access directly to security and gates, bypassing the airline bag check lobby entirely, and thus reducing curbside and check-in lobby congestion. Data from passenger profiles indicates that over 53% of passengers at Tampa Airport do not check in bags with airlines. This innovative concept provides additional landside curb and roadway capacity while offering an expedited and higher level of customer service to Tampa Airport’s passengers.

What the audience will learn

  • How identifying passenger needs led to a specialized, first in kind express lobby, which doubled curb-side capacity and simplified the passenger journey
  • How to activate intuitive wayfinding that improves curb-side customer experience
  • How to improve passenger flow by rethinking existing bottlenecks
  • How to thoughtfully design and construct a new architectural experience within existing site constraints
  • How to implement new curb-side design while maintaining 100% operations during construction

12:40 - 13:25

Panel Discussion: CX before, during and after construction

Construction can cause havoc for passengers and employees alike due to changes in routes and muscle memory, and perceived lack of communication from the airport. Furthermore, passenger satisfaction is often negatively affected by construction. This panel will discuss how to map the passenger journey during construction with the goal of maintaining higher levels of satisfaction.

What the audience will learn

  • How to work with stakeholders and partners to drive higher customer satisfaction during construction
  • How to engage with different personas before, during and after construction
  • How to drive employee engagement during construction
  • How to operationalize the voice of the customer during construction
Steve Mayers
Airport director - customer experience
Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport
USA
Arturo Garcia
COO
Avports
USA
Panel Moderator:
Sevda Fevzi, associate, customer experience and business development, Modalis Infrastructure Partners Inc.

13:25 - 15:00

Lunch

Environment and sustainability (continued)

Day 3: Friday, June 17

Environment and sustainability
09:00 - 13:30

Introduction by Conference Chair

Dr Mary Kerins
Former head of health, safety, sustainability and environment at daa
Mary Kerins
Ireland

09:05

Airport accessibility: the ‘don't worry, be happy’ strategy

Marcel van Beek
Innovation manager/program manager
Amsterdam Airport Schiphol
Netherlands
The presentation will discuss a program to motivate 10,000 employees to travel to and from the airport on their e-bikes or regular bicycles. This involves investment to upgrade the existing cycling infrastructure, bike lockers, dressing rooms and charge stations, and provision of comfortable clothing for every type of weather. It will result in reduced traffic congestion and increased vitality of personnel. Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, with its international partners, is investing in this program, which is known as goinGDutch. With its package of measures for bicycle commuters, Schiphol Airport predicts that the total number of daily bicycle commuters will be 10,000, resulting in a reduction of more than 3,000 employee cars at the airport per day by 2024.

What the audience will learn

  • Partnership and co-creation for innovation
  • Sustainability facts and figures for mobility solutions
  • A new point of view on accessibility goals
  • Bicycle solutions for longer travel distances to connect the airport

09:30

Sustainable innovations

Karin Gylin
Head of innovation
Swedavia
Sweden
Mats Berglind
Innovation manager
Swedavia
Sweden
The presentation will offer an overview of some of the innovative initiatives Swedavia’s airports have undertaken to become world leading in sustainability.

What the audience will learn

  • How to set goals for innovation
  • How an airport can affect the aviation industry
  • Examples of sustainable innovations
  • What will happen next

09:55

Sustainable airport development – decoupling growth from emissions

Tom Ruth
President and CEO
Edmonton International Airport
Canada
EIA is a leader in environmental social and governance as well as equity, diversity and inclusion. We are taking a holistic approach to sustainably developing our airport ecosystem through our Airport City Sustainability Campus. This ecosystem is strategically comprised of various partnerships with local, national and international businesses all focused on decoupling growth from environmental emissions.

What the audience will learn

  • EIA’s journey to sustainability
  • How sustainability affects air service
  • Lessons learned
  • Challenging the existing norms of airport sustainability/development
  • Sustainability is achievable even in northern climates

10:20

Environmental transition for the airport industry

Yannael Billard
Head of environment – energy department
Groupe ADP
France
Groupe ADP will present its Environmental Policy 2022-2025 based on the four strategic pillars of the Airports for Trust charter: 1. Move toward zero-environmental-impact operations to reach carbon neutrality by 2030; 2. Actively participate in the aviation sector’s environmental transition efforts and, when applicable, provide solutions airside (alternative sustainable fuels, hydrogen) to enable carbon-free aviation by the middle of the century; 3. Promote the integration of each airport into a local resource system: short routes, circular economy, production of resources on-site; 4. Reduce the environmental footprint of airport planning and development projects.

What the audience will learn

  • Paris Aéroport has already reduced its CO2 emissions per passenger by 71% over the 2009-2019 period
  • Outside France, six of the group’s airports have already achieved carbon neutrality as part of the Airport Carbon Accreditation scheme
  • Paris Aéroport is already working for the arrival of alternative sustainable fuels and hydrogen-powered aircraft
  • To integrate into local resource systems, we need to focus on short routes, circular economy and production of resources on-site
  • To reduce the environmental footprint, we need to focus on sober design, low-carbon construction and renovation of infrastructure

10:45

Zero waste in airports: helping concessionaires become more sustainable

Bruce Gregory
Managing partner
US Supply House
USA
Many airports have initiated sustainable waste management programs but many have been stalled due to economic factors and limited recycling resources. Creative sourcing, public-private partnerships and small business supply networks are ways to help airports and concessionaires overcome these challenges. There are success stories such as Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson Airport, which has implemented a comprehensive zero-waste plan to incentivize a circular economy including these instruments. Now more than ever before, airports must move quickly to divert plastic and other non-biodegradable products from landfills – our planet is in urgent need of zero-waste solutions.

What the audience will learn

  • The benefits of compostable disposable alternatives to plastic waste in terms of CO2 emissions reduction and environmental footprint
  • How to implement a successful public-private partnership program to make compostable products affordable to concessionaires
  • How to create strategic partnerships directly with manufacturers
  • How to prepare for the transition from plastic to compostable disposables as well as overcoming stakeholder challenges
  • The best way to find small business suppliers for airports products and services

11:10 - 11:25

Break

11:25

Using advanced analytics to support Heathrow’s surface access sustainability goals

Tony Caccavone
Surface access director
Heathrow Airport
UK
Surface access emissions are a key consideration in Heathrow’s sustainability strategy. Heathrow has set ambitious surface access sustainability targets and is developing strategies to achieve these goals. Heathrow has worked to develop a data-driven evidence base to track progress and inform Heathrow’s sustainability strategy. Using modern data sources and a range of advanced analytics and machine learning techniques, we delivered novel insights into Heathrow’s surface access operations. Heathrow has published the work in its Travel Report, providing transparency for its stakeholders, and enabling them to work together to create a more sustainable future.

What the audience will learn

  • What are Heathrow’s surface access sustainability strategies and targets?
  • How have Heathrow worked to build a robust, data-driven evidence base for their annual Travel Report?
  • How were advanced analytics and machine learning used to deliver novel insights, especially around private hire (taxi)?
  • What has Heathrow done to improve surface access operations and sustainability?

11:50

Airport parking in the dawn of the age of ESG

Dr Mark Friesen
Founder and managing partner
Quinta Consulting
Germany
The dawn of the age of ESG – environmental, social and governance factors – represents a true paradigm shift in the relationships between airports and their customers. Now more than ever, passengers are seeking safe, efficient and sustainable forms of mobility. As passengers slowly return, airports, airport authorities and municipalities have the opportunity to transform the airport parking experience to meet these new demands. Mobility hubs, EV charging and ridesharing concepts are some innovative notions whose applicability for making airports more sustainable is now livelily discussed. While most airports strongly believe in the contribution of airport parking for ESG, some still struggle.

What the audience will learn

  • The applicability of mobility hubs, EV charging and ridesharing concepts for airport parking
  • Best practice examples of mobility hubs, EV charging and ridesharing concepts at airports
  • The potential and the limitations of mobility hubs, EV charging and ridesharing concepts for airport parking

12:15

Intelligent power management – the optimized aircraft stand

Rune Lind Pedersen
Strategic marketing manager
ITW GSE
Denmark
This presentation will introduce the audience to the idea of intelligent power management – a system solution allowing airports to utilize their power infrastructure in a smarter way. Feedback from clients and equipment worldwide has taught us that airports are oversizing their installations while many are simultaneously limited by the capacity of their infrastructure. Utilizing a power management system, airports can right-size their gate installations and optimize their available infrastructure, allowing for more GSE to be installed at each gate. In most cases, the available infrastructure at gates that today only support GPUs, can with IPM also support a PCA.

What the audience will learn

  • Easy upgrade of existing gates with more power or air capacity without additional investments in infrastructure
  • New installations become cheaper and less complicated, with smaller pre-fusing and simpler installation
  • Minimize the environmental footprint by adding PCA to existing installations by shutting down the APU, without additional installation cost

12:40 - 13:30

Panel discussion: Making airports ready for hydrogen-powered aircraft

The advent of hydrogen-powered aircraft is a lever for air transportation decarbonization. Its key to success lies in the ability of the aeronautics and energy industries to set up the entire supply chain for LH2, to invent infrastructures and processes for liquid hydrogen (solving the technical challenges related to cryogenics - transportation, storage and distribution), and to prepare changes in the regulatory framework. For more than a year, aircraft manufacturers, airports and hydrogen industry experts have been cooperating to overcome the challenges.

What the audience will learn

  • The challenges an airport has to face to become hydrogen ready
  • The 1st step is to turn airports into hydrogen hubs
  • Structuring the upstream part of the value chain is essential
Blandine Landfried
Hydrogen program manager
Groupe ADP
France
Nicolas Landrin
Zero emission airport infrastructure manager
Airbus
France
Sosthène Grandjean
Partnerships development manager
Air Liquide
France
Panel Moderator:
Yannael Billard, head of environment – energy department, Groupe ADP

13:30 - 15:00

Lunch

Management and operations

Day 3: Friday, June 17

Management and operations
09:00 - 13:30

Introduction by Conference Chair

Velissarios Eleftheriou
Vertiport operations manager
Volocopter
Germany

09:05

Innovations for driving airport efficiency

Abhi Chacko
Head of innovation
Gatwick Airport Ltd
UK
The presentation will outline some innovations that airports should pay attention to as they operate under the cost pressures created by the Covid pandemic.

What the audience will learn

  • Areas to focus on for reducing the cost of operations
  • How innovative solutions can bring efficiency
  • Potential solutions that can lower cost – examples

09:30

How real-time turnaround data improves airport and airline operations

Samer Tirhi
Airline resource and scheduling coordinator
Sea-Tac Airport, Port of Seattle
USA
Christiaan Hen
Chief customer officer
Assaia International
Germany
We will discuss a successful state-of-the-art, AI computer vision technology solution that is used to create accurate real-time data about aircraft turnaround operations. The panel will address how this technology has created tangible operational improvements and discuss real-life case studies, explaining exactly how this exciting new technology is used in daily operations by the airport and airline and what benefits have already been achieved.

What the audience will learn

  • State-of-the-art method for creation of real-time turnaround data
  • How airports and airlines can use this data in day-to-day operations
  • How the solution has created value and benefits for airports and airlines

09:55

Airport operations plan (AOP): key enabler for improved passenger experience

Dr Thomas Günther
Airport strategy director
Frequentis Orthogon
Germany
Many airports have successfully implemented an airport operations center (APOC) for proactive management of airport operations. Nowadays, building upon successfully established processes but also responding to major challenges arising from crises, airports enhance their decision making by means of an airport operations plan (AOP) and associated support tools. The presentation summarizes how an AOP management tool supports an environment where the consequences of decisions are visible to all stakeholders, reducing airport operating costs, maximizing airport performance, supporting resilient and stable airport operations and improving the passenger experience.

What the audience will learn

  • How to significantly extend the current A-CDM planning horizon with a rolling AOP
  • How to support APOC decision makers in maintaining optimal airport performance
  • How to benefit from improved airport integration into the ATM network
  • How to recover from disruptions by leveraging the digital twin of the airport
  • How an AOP management tool was successfully deployed at a major hub airport

10:20

Connecting small and regional airports to Eurocontrol – the digital airport

Francisco Salguero
Airport operations expert
Eurocontrol
Belgium
Predictability is the main driver for all ATM stakeholders. With this goal, Eurocontrol has managed to develop the integration of airports into the ATM network for around 50% of the traffic in the ECAC area. To release the full potential of an integrated ATM network, around 200 additional airports need to be integrated. This topic will describe Eurocontrol’s approach to achieving this goal based on automation, ML/AI and airport tailored network services.

What the audience will learn

  • Eurocontrol strategy to integrate small and regional airports into the ATM
  • How ADSB in combination with ML/AI can improve departure predictability
  • Regional and small airport network services

10:45

Ground operations optimizations to reduce CO2 emissions

Franck Le Gall
Head of airport operations
Groupe ADP
France
Anthony Liot
Airside safety manager
Groupe ADP
France
Flightpath 2050 (EU) envisions a 75% reduction in CO2 emissions per pax*km by 2050 relative to 2000. This cannot be achieved by advances in aircraft technologies alone and requires contribution from all parts of the air transport system. Reducing the consumption of fuel leads to a reduction in CO2 emissions and operating costs. ADP Group is going to launch experiments to optimize ground operations. At Paris-Orly, up to 10% of CO2 emissions would be saved during the taxiing phases and 3% on the aprons. The conference will cover the experiments intended to be led by ADP Group.

What the audience will learn

  • How artificial intelligence can serve to reduce the CO2 emissions from apron operations
  • What is intended to be developed to make our process more reliable in terms of aircraft turnaround time
  • What is going to be experimented to minimize the CO2 emissions during the taxiing phases

11:10 - 11:25

Break

11:25

Leveraging the capabilities of an integrated airport technical control center

Ralph Struck
Vice president of facility management, Berlin Airport
Flughafen Berlin Brandenburg GmbH
Germany
Jan-Henrik Reber
Senior consultant
M2P Consulting GmbH
Germany
Terminal and airport facilities are highly capex and opex intensive and have a substantial impact on the airport’s carbon footprint and operational stability. Despite that, technical operations receive little attention in today’s airport ops discussions, which seems rather counterintuitive. Technical control centers (TCC) are the epicenter of technical operations. Building on the case of BER, we show the evolution of a TCC and give an outlook on how it can contribute to improving operational performance, be that in terms of reducing carbon emissions, providing a superior passenger experience or unlocking new revenue sources.

What the audience will learn

  • Why a better collaboration between TCC and AOCC can help to boost your customer experience
  • How multi-campus steering out of one central TCC can help to increase efficiency and establish new streams of revenue
  • How good technical management can improve the airport’s operational stability and help to steer utilities more sustainably
  • How to effectively drive modernization and establish a service-driven mindset in a legacy TCC
  • Why competency-based work allocation and workforce empowerment within TCC will be key enablers for successful facility management processes

11:50

Integrated operations center design - a model for efficiency/sustainability/collaboration

Smitha Radhakrishnan
Vice president, Planning
Dallas Fort Worth International Airport
USA
Thomas Hoepf
Senior vice president, global design director
EXP
USA
The new integrated operations Center at Dallas Fort Worth International Airport provides ‘360-degree situational awareness’ of all airport operations with a common, complete operating picture from both customer and operator perspectives. The co-location of formerly separate operations into one center that is functional, flexible, resilient and sustainable is a transformative approach that serves as a new model for operations centers throughout the aviation landscape. Success was achieved through true collaboration among airport leadership, stakeholders and designers from programming through completion and was facilitated with the use of interactive charrettes, precedent analysis, VR modeling and full-scale mockups.

What the audience will learn

  • What precipitated the airport's decision to co-locate, how the IOC is better and whether the IOC is working as anticipated
  • How the airport/design team managed this operational change, including the human dynamic often associated with new procedures
  • How the airport/design team prioritized the program, systems, performance and sustainability metrics
  • What aspects of the design make it functional, efficient, durable, resilient and sustainable
  • The lessons the team has learned, to assist airports that are considering developing new operations facilities

12:15

International network-based value creation strategy: towards the operational excellence model

Fernando Echegaray
Deputy chief executive officer for operations
Groupe ADP
France
Based on projects launched by Groupe ADP, this presentation will cover the concept, purposes and challenges of a network-based multi-approach value creation strategy through the development and the implementation of an operational excellence model.

What the audience will learn

  • Ambition: the strategic purposes of an operational excellence model, for airports, for a company and for other stakeholders
  • Structure: the development and implementation process; the field that can be covered; framework of standards, assessment and improvement tools
  • People: governance and organization; how to mobilize people and skills through participative work and to animate professional streams

12:40

APOC: it’s all about improvement, even today!

Korijn Defever
Senior manager - operational excellence
Airport Intelligence
Belgium
Setting up an APOC is one thing; how to move this setup to a truly proactive, collaborative decision making environment based on data and insights is another. Trust and iteration are the way to grow the maturity of your APOC together with your stakeholders and to ensure operational excellence and cost-efficiency. This presentation outlines a step-by-step program with a three-fold positive impact: true collaborative decision making, transparent data exchange and a focus on performance. With these strong values, the APOC has proven to be a very strong tool to cope with the uncertainties and disruptions brought by the Covid-19 pandemic.

What the audience will learn

  • Continuous improvement in an APOC environment
  • The benefits of having progressive evolution
  • How change and innovation can steer your APOC to data-drive proactive decision making as the basis for operational excellence
  • How in today’s world full with virtual interactions a physical APOC is still relevant

13:05

The traditional APOC – a superseded concept?

Andreas Hofmann
Director of business development
Amorph Systems GmbH
Germany
We all experienced the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on our job situation. Remote work became the new norm and technical solutions like Teams were essential for communication. In this aspect, operational staff were somehow left behind. With the slow adoption rate for new technologies, most airports struggled to bring their operations to a technical level that enabled remote or decentralized working. This presentation will explain the concept of virtual operations (VCR), how it will save costs for airports in the future and why the traditional APOC is no longer needed.

What the audience will learn

  • What is a virtual control room (VCR)?
  • Why does it save costs?
  • How can I start implementing a VCR?
  • How much effort is required for the first steps?

13:30 - 15:00

Lunch

Technovation (continued)

Day 3: Friday, June 17

Technovation
09:00 - 13:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Catherine Mayer
Vice president
SITA
USA
Maurice Jenkins
CIO
Miami International Airport
USA
Pierre Charbonneau
Senior advisor – passenger experience
UFA
Canada
Samuel Ingalls
Principal consultant
Barich
USA

09:05

How to enhance the passenger experience through partnerships

Megan Thoben
Director of operations and business development
Louisville Regional Airport Authority
USA
Charles Kowalczyk
Domestic sales operations manager
AtlasIED
USA
Audiovisual, life-safety and technology-rich systems are unique in their complexity and the rate at which the technology evolves. Although they are expertly trained, airport staff can sometimes be challenged by project timelines, product availability, interconnecting brands and scope creep. More than ever, partnerships between airports and manufacturers ensure that technology is leveraged to not only ensure future-resistant systems but also enhance passenger experience and process efficiency. Join SDF and AtlasIED in the discussion of how these valuable partnerships make sense for modern, mission-critical environments.

What the audience will learn

  • Why partnerships between airports and technology manufacturers can benefit everyone
  • How to leverage those relationships to keep airport technology future-resistant
  • Some characteristics of healthy business relationships and some not so healthy ones

09:30 - 10:20

Panel discussion: Personal robotics: innovative use cases for enhanced airport customer experience

Over the last few years, some pioneering companies have leveraged the implementation of robotic technologies, focusing on commercial use cases to support personal, domestic needs. As this application would reach a much broader target audience than the traveling public, some of these technologies have not yet provided clear use cases for the airport and aviation environment. This presentation will describe an innovative approach to effectively add value to the aviation and airport environment using some of these cutting-edge robotic platforms, in partnership with some of the most advanced technology service providers worldwide.

What the audience will learn

  • Artificial intelligence applied to the airport customer experience
  • Robotics and the automation of behavior detection
  • How robotics interact with customer emotions and perceptions
  • Implementation case studies
  • Potential future opportunities
Aaron Beeson
Director of innovation
VINCI Airports
France
Naasira Wahid
Marketing program manager, new business incubation
Sony Electronics
USA
Panel Moderator:
Arturo Garcia, COO, Avports

10:20 - 11:10

Panel discussion: Improving operations through innovation – redefining cargo at LAX

Although air cargo represents only 1% of global trade tonnage, it accounts for a third of global trade value. As a major point of entry to the United States, LAX is well positioned to transform this market sector over the coming decades. With aging structures and disaggregated cargo facilities, LAX is considering an unprecedented cargo campus redevelopment. Our panel will discuss exciting new cargo redevelopment opportunities at LAX, focused around the objective of fully modernizing cargo facilities and operations at the airport, including sustainability goals, opportunities for innovation and business model alternatives.

What the audience will learn

  • The new paradigm for a cargo campus in the US
  • How to transform the cargo facilities at the second-largest airport in the US without disrupting operations
  • How to increase cargo throughput while reducing building size and land area
  • How cargo facilities can be good neighbors to the surrounding communities
Robert Falcon
Deputy executive director, Development Group Enterprise Services Division
Los Angeles World Airports
USA
Anne Fletcher
Managing principal
HOK
USA
Gisela Shanahan
Managing director
Frasca & Associates, LLC
USA
Panel Moderators:
Benjamin Anstiss, Los Angeles Aviation Market Leader, Arup
Regine Weston, Arup fellow, leader of airport planning in the Americas, Arup

11:10 - 11:25

Break

11:25

Implementing digital process management at a greenfield airport

Mark Schwarz
Head digitalisation and business excellence
Zurich Airport International
Switzerland
Jan Michael Wicki
Head program development and coordination
Noida International Airport (by Flughafen Zürich AG)
India
Noida International Airport (NIA) intends to set a new benchmark as a digital, user-friendly airport in India. Being a greenfield project offers the chance to set up smart process management for the whole airport community from the start. NIA aims to provide a common process management platform giving all the airport community access to the concept of operations and connecting it with the data-sharing strategy at the same time.

What the audience will learn

  • Using agile project management for the development of a concept of operations for a greenfield airport
  • Building a digital process management platform for the airport community
  • Connecting data and processes in a smart framework

11:50

Airport data exchange platforms: the beginning of a revolution?

Jean-Sébastien Mackiewicz
Airport solutions director
Hub One (Groupe ADP)
France
The smart airport is an objective shared by all major airports to make the passenger experience seamless. Data sharing is a reality regarding operational tools for airport process performance, but smart airport needs data exchange between all airport stakeholders to deliver its full benefits. The exchange of data will become widespread and create a new dynamic of value and new services for the airport ecosystem. The time has come to unlock the potential of data. What changes are already taking place? What types of services will emerge? What impact will data exchange have on the airport ecosystem?

What the audience will learn

  • Data sharing is a necessary step to accelerate the digitalization of airports
  • Data exchange will allow many new services to emerge
  • There are important new revenue streams to exploit data, including monetization with companies from sectors other than airports

12:15

CCTV data analytics, delivering innovation and insights to our airports

Marc Mullan
VP data and analytics
Dublin Airport Authority
Ireland
Bala Baskaran
Data engineering and platforms manager
Dublin Airport
Ireland
This award-winning project is the result of research and innovation conducted by the Dublin City University in partnership with Dublin Airport and the DAA data and analytics teams. We are creating a real-time system using AI deep learning computer vision with a novel approach to detect individual passengers, anonymizing them and re-identifying them along their airport journey. We are addressing the challenges of the real-world airport environment utilizing the existing CCTV airport camera network, delivering passenger flow management and monitoring solutions. While the project is in the early stages, we have already identified many opportunities and challenges that we would like to share.

What the audience will learn

  • How we are delivering innovative solutions through a collaborative partnership with one of Ireland’s leading universities
  • How we have leveraged existing technology including cameras, IOT streaming, geospatial (GIS) data and AOS
  • How we deployed passenger journeys in real time and created a futureproofed framework for new use cases
  • How this ground-breaking visibility opens up new possibilities in how key passenger processes can be improved
  • The challenges we have encountered and how we have addressed them

12:40

How to leverage big data capabilities to improve airport fluidity

Bastien Bernard
Chief operating officer
Groupe ADP
France
Major airports are facing – or will likely face in the near future – flow capacity constraints (ground transportation, check-in, security checks, border controls, etc), degrading flight punctuality and passenger and airline satisfaction. Airports are becoming increasingly ‘smart’ but also complex ecosystems to optimize. As available data skyrockets and passengers’ expectations continue to rise, big data capabilities mean that figures can help to better understand the airport processes and improve operational performance efficiently.

What the audience will learn

  • Why will airport operators need big data capabilities to further optimize passengers flows?
  • What are the main requirements to implement a big data strategy?
  • Application to a specific case study of passenger journey

13:05

Navigating the sea of data: operational and legal implications

Wendy Reiter
Director of aviation security
Port of Seattle
USA
Donald Zoufal
President
CrowZnest Consulting, Inc.
USA
This presentation will provide a discussion of airport innovations in data collection and examine some legal implications outlined in Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) - Legal Research Digest 42 (May 2021). It will offer a discussion of the following: what some of the developing airport practices around the collection of data are (and what the legal implications of those practices are); what the operational implications of data collection are; what the developing legal trends are concerning the collection and use of data; and what measures airport stakeholders should take to mitigate legal risk in data collection and use.

What the audience will learn

  • Some of the trending airport uses of data
  • The operational implications of data collection
  • The legal implications of data collection
  • How airports can mitigate risk in data collection
  • How airports can maximize benefits from data collection

13:30 - 15:00

Lunch

Welcome and opening address

Day 1: Wednesday, June 15

Welcome and opening address
08:35 - 08:55

08:35

WELCOME TO PASSENGER TERMINAL CONFERENCE & EXPO 2022!

Tony Robinson
Chairman and CEO, UKi Media & Events / founder
Passenger Terminal EXPO & Passenger Terminal World
UK

08:40

WELCOME TO PARIS - OPENING ADDRESS

Augustin de Romanet
CEO
Groupe ADP
France
We stand at a crucial moment in the history of air travel. Our business has been severely affected by the Covid-19; and yet, we have to look beyond the pandemic. Two challenges are ahead of us. First, the decarbonation of air travel. Airports have to become multi energy hubs and we aim, at Groupe ADP, to get the whole sector on board towards this ambition. Our second challenge is to improve the passenger experience. Airports have to work towards seamless passenger journeys, and set themselves the highest hospitality standards. Through addressing these challenges, we shape the airport of tomorrow.

What the audience will learn

  • Groupe ADP transforms its airports into multi-energy hubs that will provide hydrogen and SAF for airline companies
  • We strive to achieve carbon neutrality at Orly Airport by 2025, setting a sustainable model for our other airports
  • We create seamless passenger journeys, through the help of new technologies and more widely the development of the
  • We improve the passenger experience with the creation of a new hospitality and retail brand called
  • Our airports become multimodal as they encourage and facilitate the use of other modes of transportation

All conference streams will begin promptly at 09:00hrs. Please make your way to your conference rooms.

Advanced air mobility and vertiport development

Day 1: Wednesday, June 15

Advanced air mobility and vertiport development
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Paolo Bianchi
Head of infrastructure strategy and planning
Bologna Airport
Italy
Velissarios Eleftheriou
Vertiport operations manager
Volocopter
Germany

09:05

The electric aviation era

Robin Riedel
Partner
McKinsey and Company
USA
This presentation will discuss the challenges and opportunities for the aviation industry.

09:25

NASA’s vision for advanced air mobility (AAM)

Huy Tran
Director of aeronautics
NASA
USA
NASA vision for Advanced Air Mobility is to create a collaborative ecosystem where industries, government agencies and academia to exchange ideas and technologies to enable growth in this new market sector. NASA goal is to provide research findings and systems requirement for safe integration of AAM vehicles into the current airspace with services-oriented architecture toward the future data-driven air traffic management systems.

What the audience will learn

  • Airspace management – extensible UAS Traffic Management Framework to UAM
  • Automation and contingency management
  • High density Vertiport and verti-plex operations
  • Field testing to validate systems architecture and technologies for AAM applications with partners participation

09:45

Vertiports design specifications and regulations perspective

Predrag Sekulic
Aerodromes expert
European Union Aviation Safety Agency, EASA
Germany
Vertiports constitute one of the fundamental elements of the overall UAM system and play an important role for the successful implementation of the new transportation concept. Their integration in existing aerodrome infrastructures or in the city landscape requires a thorough analysis of requirements for the safe operations. The presentation explores the approach taken for the development of the early design specifications for vertiports and presents the expected challenges for the implementation of the future regulations. The foreseen future steps of the European regulatory framework developments for vertiports will be also presented.

What the audience will learn

  • Why prototype technical specifications and not the rules?
  • Why vertiports requirements in two steps?
  • What future rules will cover or foresee?
  • Vertiports in the scope of Basic Regulation (EU Regulation 1139/2018), what does it means?

10:05

The Italian national strategic plan for advanced air mobility

Carmela Tripaldi
Research and development - new technologies and aerospace
ENAC CAA-IT
Italy
Davide Drago
Engineer/director of airports department
ENAC - Italian Civil Aviation Authority
Italy
The big Italian challenge is to create a national ecosystem for the development of advanced air mobility services into 2030. We have established a comprehensive strategy, and designed a road map including specific activities for each gap to be solved. The implementation of the activities will allow us to increase the level of maturity of the Italian ecosystem of advanced air mobility.

What the audience will learn

  • The Italian AAM holistic approach
  • Target applications and gaps to unlock the system
  • The main clusters of activities for development of AAM services

10:25 - 10:45

Q&A + Discussion

Huy Tran
Director of aeronautics
NASA
USA
Robin Riedel
Partner
McKinsey and Company
USA
Carmela Tripaldi
Research and development - new technologies and aerospace
ENAC CAA-IT
Italy
Predrag Sekulic
Aerodromes expert
European Union Aviation Safety Agency, EASA
Germany

10:45 - 11:05

Break

11:05

Advance air mobility demand modeling – who is switching modes?

Darrell Swanson
Director
Swanson Aviation Consultancy Ltd
UK
AAM is likely to happen closer to passengers' origins/destinations, which means that it will occur at dedicated vertiports or at smaller regional and general aviation airports. The challenge that future operators, airports, local authorities and manufacturers will have is determining who are these passengers are and why they will switch to AAM. In this presentation, Swanson Aviation Consultancy sets out its method for identifying passengers who will shift to AAM and provides an example of a specific UK route for consideration. The presentation will also discuss the implication that this will have on ground infrastructure requirements including vertiport sizing and power requirements to enable electric aircraft operations.

What the audience will learn

  • How electric aircraft will lead to a future of distributed aviation
  • Why smaller airfields and airports closer to passenger origin/destinations will benefit from advanced air mobility
  • How to approach demand modeling for AAM where there is no history of aviation services
  • How this approach to demand modeling will help identify routes not previously explored by airports and airlines

11:25

Local communities and UAM: nurturing societal acceptance through co-creation

Dr Vassilis Agouridas
Head of EU public co-creation and ecosystem outreach
AIRBUS Urban Mobility
Germany
The emerging UAM/AAM ecosystem has been driven predominately by cross-industry technological advances and convergence. Societal acceptance is figuring nowadays as a major, if not the most dominant, challenge in the realisation of UAM services and their associated business cases, and thus, of market triggering and uptake. This presentation will discuss societal viewpoints with an emphasis on the emerging role of local authorities and their catalysing participation in co-creating sustainable and responsible integrated mobility services including UAM/AAM modal options.

What the audience will learn

  • A wider ecosystem consideration of UAM/AAM
  • The societal challenges associated with UAM/AAM
  • The emerging and catalysing role of local authorities for nurturing societal acceptance

11:45

The inner urban vertiport

Jörn Jaeger
Head of airspace and vertiports
Volocopter GmbH
Germany
Placing and operating take-off and landing sites in dense urban environments (vertiports) creates several challenges and needs a thorough understanding of the aircraft concept of operations. Volocopter conducted a project to design a fully functional vertiport with the smallest footprint possible. This presentation provides insight into the project results by giving an overview of vertiport requirements, constraints and solutions.

What the audience will learn

  • essential design criteria and requirements for an inner urban vertiport
  • If you don’t know the aircraft you cannot design a vertiport
  • what the passenger journey will look like
  • how the same vertiport can fit different locations and target groups
  • how long it takes to implement a vertiport

12:05

Next-generation air mobility business development in airline

Masato Kunezaki
Director, air mobility business creation department
Japan Airlines Ltd
Japan
The social implementation of the eVTOL air taxi service in Japan is aimed at the timing of Osaka-Kansai Expo 2025. In this presentation, the activities relating to new business development in airline will be explained, in addition to the business scenario tasks to be solved, the roadmap for UAV and the commercialization of the air taxi business, keeping airline in mind.

What the audience will learn

  • An example of new business development strategies by airline
  • An example of the UAV logistics business scenario in Japan
  • An example of the air taxi business scenario in Japan
  • Tasks to be solved for air taxi business commercialization in Japan
  • The roadmap for air taxi business commercialization in Japan

12:25 - 12:45

Q&A + Discussion

Darrell Swanson
Director
Swanson Aviation Consultancy Ltd
UK
Jörn Jaeger
Head of airspace and vertiports
Volocopter GmbH
Germany
Masato Kunezaki
Director, air mobility business creation department
Japan Airlines Ltd
Japan
Dr Vassilis Agouridas
Head of EU public co-creation and ecosystem outreach
AIRBUS Urban Mobility
Germany

12:45 - 14:00

Lunch

14:00

Vertiports in an urban infrastructure environment

Julian Carlson
Director
Pascall+Watson
UK
As populations the world over progressively urbanise, the need for fast, efficient alternative forms of transport, particularly within the city context, will come to the fore. The high passenger turnover and variable capacity of eVTOL requires specialised facilities and modes of operation not observed in the commercial aviation community. This presentation explores; some of the challenges presented in supporting vertiport infrastructure, how to successfully integrate them into the urban fabric of our cities and ultimately the social acceptance of this yet unrealised third dimension of point to point travel opportunities.

What the audience will learn

  • How vertiports can fit with other transportation infrastructure
  • What some of the technical challenges required to support vertiport infrastructure are
  • Why urban fabric integration is key to understanding how vertiports will be accepted

14:20

Successfully siting, designing, building and operating vertiports now to ensure our future

Kevin Cox
Chief executive officer
Ferrovial Vertiports
USA
For decades, humans have flocked to cities and urban areas creating congestion and pushing transportation infrastructure to the limit. In a race not seen since the days of the Wright Brothers, innovative companies are rapidly designing, developing, and seeking certification of vertical take-off and landing aircraft that will forever change urban transportation, utilizing technology that will ensure passengers are transported in a safe, quiet, and sustainable way. The success of this nascent industry is, however, highly dependent upon the proper siting, development, construction, and operation of a series of agnostic vertiport networks, seamlessly integrated into the fabric of their surroundings.

What the audience will learn

  • Why proper siting of vertiports is highly dependent upon the business model, the expected demand, and solving for the first and last mile
  • With vertiports being developed from a “blank sheet of paper,” why it is important to utilize lessons learned from commercial aviation and what lessons may need to be “unlearned”
  • For a vertiport network to be resilient and successful, why it must be agnostic to aircraft type, the aircraft mission, the business model, and its operator
  • Why federal, state, regional and local officials should embrace this new and sustainable form of transportation and not seek to over regulate it
  • How and why vertiports can and should be “future-proofed”

14:40

Urban-Air Port: A new era in aviation demands new infrastructure

Adrian Zanelli
Chief financial officer
Urban-Air Port
UK

15:00

Unlocking the sky for advanced air mobility (AAM)

Duncan Walker
Chief executive officer
Skyports
UK
This presentation considers the need for rapid delivery of vertiport infrastructure for passenger-carrying electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) aircraft to enable the AAM to grow and scale; the likely trade-offs between design and functionality of vertiports for the purposes of cost-effectiveness and deliverability; the importance of testing critical vertiport and eVTOL technologies, safety/security procedures and passenger processing. It draws on experiences of delivering vertiports and plans to develop and integrate Europe’s first test eVTOL vertiport in France within an existing airport to provide a commercial air taxi service in time for the 2024 Paris Olympics.

What the audience will learn

  • The deployment of fully functional vertiports quickly and at scale to enable commercial air services
  • How to meet the highest regulated safety standards for vertiport design and operations while still providing a pleasant passenger experience
  • How to integrate vertiports into existing aerodromes/airports to complement existing aviation services
  • The regulatory challenges related to advanced aerial mobility infrastructure and how to overcome them
  • The benefits of providing vertiports at airports (airside and/or landside) as part of the passenger and onward transportation offering

15:20 - 15:40

Q&A + Discussion

Adrian Zanelli
Chief financial officer
Urban-Air Port
UK
Kevin Cox
Chief executive officer
Ferrovial Vertiports
USA
Duncan Walker
Chief executive officer
Skyports
UK
Julian Carlson
Director
Pascall+Watson
UK

15:40 - 15:55

Break

15:55

Vertiports: what can we learn from our progress so far?

Elisabeth Bernitt
Senior vice president
AECOM Technical Services Inc
USA
Suzanne Murtha
Vice president, global lead for connected and automated technologies
AECOM
USA
AECOM is currently supporting the global deployment of eVTOLs and working with Ferrovial and Lilium to design a network of vertiports connecting strategic locations in major Florida cities. With many global regions likely to see the deployment of eVTOL in the coming years, what will this mean for airports and other modes of air travel? Drawing on AECOM's eVTOL experience, this presentation looks at what airports are currently doing to support eVTOL deployment and will discuss the design, policy and airport operations considerations required for airports to develop vertiport infrastructure.

What the audience will learn

  • What airports are currently doing to support eVTOL deployments
  • How design for eVTOL and routing could impact airport operations
  • About the policies that will support eVTOL deployments
  • The lessons learned from the progress the industry has made so far

16:15

Air mobility integration at airports

Marco Pellegrino
Head of airside operations and first aid, Aeroporti di Roma
Urban Blue (representative)
Italy
The big challenge of advanced air mobility integration with legacy airport operations is finding new solutions for new mobility businesses. The goal is to guarantee safety, security and seamless operations for customers. Smooth, quick and sustainable operations maintain high standards of safety and security, without interfering with airport operations. Achieving this goal is crucial for engaging a higher number of stakeholders than in the past.

What the audience will learn

  • SWAT analysis of air mobility in the airport environment
  • Overview of the new stakeholder network for enabling a deeper connection of the airport with the urban and regional area
  • New scenario of the interaction between ATM and UTM in the terminal area
  • New technological solutions to garantee safety and security

16:35

The advanced air mobility program at Munich Airport

Oliver Schultes
Senior consultant and project manager
Munich Airport International GmbH
Germany
Urban Air Mobility stands for a new, innovative way of transporting passengers and goods. The development of such transport solutions has long since ceased to be a vision. As a future mobility concept, it has the potential to directly connect urban regions, create new business ideas and improve the overall travel experience. The advanced air mobility program at Munich Airport focuses on the seamless integration of these new means of transport – particularly for passengers – into the existing airport environment. The presentation will provide insights into Munich Airport’s advanced air mobility program, including associated challenges and solutions for a successful vertiport integration at airports.

What the audience will learn

  • Get to know how Munich Airport is approaching the UAM use case of air taxi
  • Gather information about the specific challenges of and solutions for integrating a vertiport in an airport environment
  • Get to know Munich Airports Air Mobility services and solutions

16:55

Urban air mobility: fast-forwarding to Paris 2024 Olympic Games

Joyce Abou Moussa
Urban air mobility strategy, development and partnerships lead
Groupe ADP
France
Alban Negret
Head of innovation and corporate venture
Groupe ADP
France
While advanced air mobility (AAM) vehicle technology is advancing very rapidly, a number of challenges raised by this new form of mobility in terms of use, acceptability, regulations, technologies and industrialization are still to be addressed. In order to respond to these challenges, and better prepare for a pre-commercial showcase at the Paris 2024 Olympic Games, Groupe ADP and RATP Group launched the testing phase of the AAM Pontoise Airfield Sandbox in November 2021, to drive maturity forward.

What the audience will learn

  • Vertiports in airport context
  • Pontoise Airfield Sandbox
  • AAM challenges
  • 2024 Paris Olympics and objectives

17:15 - 17:35

Q&A + Discussion

Joyce Abou Moussa
Urban air mobility strategy, development and partnerships lead
Groupe ADP
France
Marco Pellegrino
Head of airside operations and first aid, Aeroporti di Roma
Urban Blue (representative)
Italy
Oliver Schultes
Senior consultant and project manager
Munich Airport International GmbH
Germany
Suzanne Murtha
Vice president, global lead for connected and automated technologies
AECOM
USA

Opening Day Party hosted by Groupe ADP. Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Airport cities, transport connections and regions

Day 2: Thursday, June 16

Airport cities, transport connections and regions
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Alexandra Covrig
Senior project manager
Airport Regions Council
Belgium
Sergi Alegre Calero
Director general
ARC - Airport Regions Conference
Belgium

09:05

Creating airports as lovable destinations

Michala Lander
Technical director - social planning
GHD
New Zealand
Airports are uniquely placed to act as location ‘ambassadors’, helping to promote the best of what their home cities and surrounding regions have to offer. Viewed in this way, airports can be reimagined as lovable destinations that are much more than transit points; they can be destinations in and of themselves. To capitalize on this means identifying and understanding the most compelling and appealing attributes of their location during the airport design phase. The potential payoff is significant: a thriving, vibrant aerotropolis precinct that supports regional development and tourism.

What the audience will learn

  • Identifying the unique attributes of a city and how these can be used to connect an airport with its environment
  • Focusing on the ‘people experience’ so that airport precincts are designed to cater for visitors, workers and residents
  • Presentation of the Loveable City Framework and its application for an aerotropolis, using the Western Sydney Airport case study
  • Applying world-leading people movement planning and data analytics capability to support placemaking, commercial opportunities and enhanced visitor experience
  • Considering the future role of airports and how they relate to communities

09:30

How a region can positively affect local airport development

Marja Aalto
Senior specialist, aviation
Business Tampere Oy
Finland
It's difficult to get airlines to commit to flight operations in remote areas of Europe. When the market is closed, the location is far away and your region is unknown by airlines; when there are only a few airlines operating from your airport – is there a way to make you known to the world? This presentation showcases how a small region can take matters into its own hands and raise awareness of its existence. With successful marketing and development work, the Tampere region has gone from being a hidden and unknown place to a known opportunity for new companies.

What the audience will learn

  • How a region can be a key operator in air transportation development work
  • The power of collaboration by regional companies when the working budget is low
  • How to market your regional industry and city development into a successful and accessible destination
  • How to connect local interest groups to support you and work together towards the same target
  • The power of visibility and strength in numbers internationally despite being small and unknown

09:55

Modus project: scenarios for future European multimodal air transport

Nadine Pilon
Research project manager
Eurocontrol
France
The overall performance of future European transport will depend on the alignment and optimization of multimodal transport, to provide a seamless journey for air passengers while mitigating capacity constraints. The four scenarios developed in the Modus project aim to explore how air traffic management (ATM) and air transport can contribute to improving passengers’ multimodal, especially combined air plus rail, journeys for better studying the impact on transport performance. They focus on particular aspects having the potential to significantly change the transport system: (1) pre-pandemic recovery (baseline), (2) European short-haul shift, (3) growth with strong technological support, (4) decentralized, remote and digital.

What the audience will learn

  • Passenger demand for multimodal mobility will evolve
  • Air-rail complementarity can improve passenger experience
  • Transport performance will be about sustainability

10:20 - 10:40

Break

10:40

Evolutionary infrastructure: a look at the horizon for spaceport master planning

Francis Walker
London studio director
Corgan
UK
The Global Spaceport Alliance (GSA) was established in 2015 with the goal of creating a global network of spaceports that will allow increased access to space, and that can serve as focal points and technology hubs in growing the space economy. As emerging typologies in the built environment, spaceports have the potential to be the social, economic and even cultural engines of 21st century communities. These communities strive to create bright futures for their citizens, with optimized mobility and connectivity; spaceports can be central to this aspiration, with the space industry the fastest growing industry today. The spaceport as an extension of the airport and air mobility as a platform for new communities.

What the audience will learn

  • The core definitions of spaceports
  • Global approaches to development
  • What we can imagine in the future

11:05

HKIA expansion plan – an airport city & 3RS

Kevin Poole
Chief representative, UK & Europe
Airport Authority Hong Kong
Hong Kong
The presentation will cover Hong Kong International Airport's expansion plan – taking it from a city airport to an airport city and three-runway system (3RS).

What the audience will learn

  • HKIA is more competitive and stronger post Covid-19
  • The business opportunities brought by HKIA’s three-runway system and airport city development
  • How HKIA expanded market catchment to the Greater Bay Area

11:30

The airport city, a sustainable economic development in interaction with the stakeholders

Hubert Fontanel
Real estate deputy director
Groupe ADP
France
When airports are looking for new sources of value creation as much as they are seeking to forge partnerships with the surrounding communities, the development of the airport city can provide an economic and urban response. Any urban development at the limits of an airport interacts strongly with the developments of the surrounding agglomerations in terms of the real estate market, as a part of a local competitive field and in terms of urban quality and connectivity. However, the traditional developments of airports, terminals and runways call for technical and commercial skills that come entirely from the aeronautical sphere.

What the audience will learn

  • How an airport may achieve profitable and resilient real estate developments meeting local markets and airport needs and constraints
  • How to mobilize the skills adapted for these developments
  • How to maximize income while maintaining control over the future of realized assets

11:55

Airport cities and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

Dr Viktoriia Myroniuk
Lecturer in aviation
Salford University
UK
The presentation will discuss the main United Nations Sustainable Development Goals which may and should be met by airport cities. The most prominent real-life examples and best practices from airport cities around the globe will be given. Not only the advantages but also the challenges to the economic, social and environmental sustainability of airport cities, as well as solutions to such challenges, will be looked into.

What the audience will learn

  • The main United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, which may and should be met by airport cities
  • Prominent real-life examples and best practices of economic, social and environmental sustainability from airport cities around the globe
  • Advantages and challenges to the sustainability of airport cities, and possible solutions

12:20 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

Implementing new mobility strategies to reduce carbon emissions at airports

Tine Haas
Principal aviation
Dornier Consulting
Germany
A significant amount of carbon emission is generated by passengers and staff traveling to and from the airport. Emerging new technologies and digitalization change the way people travel. This is a chance for airports to actively manage landside access and encourage a modal shift toward more sustainable travel options. Applications featuring MaaS and nudging approaches enable airports to create incentives for travelers to use public and shared-service transport. Similar solutions can be applied to the management of staff mobility needs. Mobility strategies have the potential to reduce the carbon footprint and improve the efficiency of airport operations at the same time.

What the audience will learn

  • Impact of new mobility on airport access
  • Mobility scenarios and new business models
  • Strategies for nudging toward more sustainable travel modes
  • Cooperation with MaaS platform operators

14:10

Creating a mobility hub to shape the future of mobility

Jennifer Berz
Senior project manager corporate strategy and digitalization
Fraport AG
Germany
The future of mobility will be fundamentally different from what we know today. While demand for mobility will thrive again after the pandemic, new means of transport and new market players will shape customer mobility. While customer preferences will shift, climate change will present new challenges. To overcome these challenges, airports need to fully embrace intermodality to address sustainability demands and provide a customer-centric approach to innovation and digitalization with regard to mobility.

What the audience will learn

  • What is a mobility hub and how it could address challenges from an airport point of view
  • Trends in mobility
  • Which trends affect airports and how they do so
  • Customers’ expectations of a mobility hub
  • How airports can develop into mobility hubs

14:35

How Covid-19 mobility trends revolutionize air transport and cities

Manuel Chaufrein
CEO and founder
Avairx
France
While the advent of more sustainable aviation solutions offers new opportunities, from SAF to airports becoming power hubs thanks to the development of hydrogen ecosystems, the Covid-19 crisis has set new challenges to the development and business of future airport cities. Remote and flexible work is epitomizing risks for office real estate developments, affecting the profitability of business travel; electrified advanced air mobility will start off with less profitable regional ranges, challenged by future ultra-high-speed ground transport, such as Hyperloop; and the revival of sleeper trains answers the quest for affordable travel. Can airports benefit from these trends and if so, how?

What the audience will learn

  • Seizing opportunities for new hyper-connected mobility solutions to develop airport cities and new business
  • Designing airports as next-generation mobility hubs 360°
  • Taking advantage of the Covid-19 new normal to develop innovative business models
  • Airports as social and work inclusion catalysts

15:00 - 15:20

Break

15:20

How can airport surface access help secure net zero carbon?

Shamal Ratnayaka
Aviation strategy lead
Transport for London
UK
In the context of the climate change emergency and COP26, this presentation sets out the key role that sustainable airport surface access can play in contributing to decarbonization in the aviation sector. This draws on the experience of London as the world's largest aviation market and home to six international airports and also looks ahead to the opening of Crossrail in 2022.

What the audience will learn

  • The need for a more holistic approach to airport surface access
  • The range of levers and interventions to drive sustainable mode shift
  • How London and its airports are rising to the challenge

15:45

Creating a sense of place: visionary and sustainable airport cities

Ashwini Thorat
Head of design and planning
Noida International Airport
India
Peter Jenkins
Architect director, head of transport sector
BDP
UK
The creation of successful airport city masterplans requires intense multi-disciplinary inputs including urban design, architecture, infrastructure, transport, commercial opportunities, marketing and ICT. Within the context of airport development guidelines, our work defines the principles of development that is underpinned by a sustainable surface transport strategy that incorporates both low-carbon and active travel modes. Our presentation will explain how to develop frameworks that are simultaneously visionary, deliverable and flexible, drawing on our recent work for our client at Noida International Airport.

What the audience will learn

  • Creating airport cities with local relevance and cultural connections
  • Integration of low-carbon and active travel modes for surface transport
  • Utilizing airport development guidelines to steer sustainable development
  • How cross-sector thinking maximizes viability in clients’ investments
  • Insights into how design consultants will support clients in a post-Covid world

16:10 - 17:30

Panel discussion: How can landside development drive innovation?

Airports face three big challenges: they need to find new revenue sources, they need to adapt to climate change and they need to automate and digitalize their operations. This panel investigates how strategic landside development can empower airports to achieve all three of these goals. Leading experts will explain how they’re leveraging the landside to drive innovation and help airports become more financially, environmentally and operationally resilient. Drawing on successful examples from Europe, North America and Asia, panelists will highlight the key drivers that determine the success of their landside development strategy - and how other airports can do the same.

What the audience will learn

  • How successful airports leverage the landside to drive growth and diversify revenue
  • How landside development can reduce the airport’s carbon footprint
  • How successful airports use the landside as a test bed for new technologies
  • How successful cities and regions develop the airport area to drive growth and create jobs
Arturs Saveljevs
CCO
Riga International Airport
Latvia
Arja Lukin
Director, Airport City Aviapolis
City of Vantaa
Finland
Brian Cobb
Chief innovation officer
Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (CVG)
USA
Inkie Kim
Project manager, airport policy division
Daegu Metropolitan City
Korea
Pálmi Freyr Randversson
CEO
Keflavik Airport Development Company (Kadeco)
Iceland
Pieter van der Horst
Project director
Schiphol Area Development Company
Netherlands
Panel Moderator:
Max Hirsh, managing director, Airport City Academy

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS ceremony and celebration. Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Airport design, planning and development

Day 1: Wednesday, June 15

Airport design, planning and development
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Ashwini Thorat
Head of design and planning
Noida International Airport
India
Tim Walder
Senior director and aviation sector leader
Arcadis
UK

09:05 - 09:50

Panel discussion: Noida Airport: leading design and procurement through a pandemic

The need to provide a new airport for Noida, India, was identified in a pre-pandemic world and a competition was launched while industries throughout the world were starting to adapt to a new way of working, with wide-reaching impacts on the aviation industry. This seismic shift placed a significant responsibility on stakeholders and designers alike to undertake a rapid transition of technological, collaborative and behavioral working methods and adapt to a new, efficient workflow, delivering a tender submission in just over a year. The client and design team will reflect on the lessons learned throughout this challenging but enlightening period.

What the audience will learn

  • Adapting to new methods of remote team management, bringing efficiency to procurement through close collaboration
  • Adapting teams to agile working from home – behavioral shifts in remote working methods
  • Flexible resource management – the resilience of joint ventures
  • Leveraging online digital technology platforms and cloud-based tools to collaborate and manage workflows and design
  • Sometimes online is not enough – choosing when to meet face to face
Ashwini Thorat
Head of design and planning
Noida International Airport
India
Jan Michael Wicki
Head program development and coordination
Noida International Airport (by Flughafen Zürich AG)
India
Martin Moe
Associate partner, architect
Nordic Office of Architecture
Norway
Vishwa Mehra
Associate director - aviation India
Jacobs
India
Panel Moderator:
Nicolas Schenk, chief development officer, Noida International Airport (a Zurich Airport International company)

09:50

The future airport and the challenges that lie ahead

Paul Griffiths
CEO
Dubai Airports
United Arab Emirates
As the world’s largest international airport, Dubai Airports rebounded from the global pandemic much faster than many other airports and were able to insulate ourselves from many of the problems of resource and facility reactivation that have been experienced by other airports around the world. This presentation will cover recovery and rediscovery – challenges and opportunities for the world’s largest intercontinental hub. I will describe dealing with the sudden loss of 89m annual passengers, how this has impacted Dubai’s business model and what opportunities lie ahead to transform airport design, operation and the passenger experience.

What the audience will learn

  • Rebounding from the global pandemic
  • How to insulate from problems of resource and facility reactivation
  • Passenger experience

10:15

Bucking the trend: expanding Iceland's aviation offer during Covid-19

Guðmundur Daði Rúnarsson
Chief commercial and airport development officer
Isavia
Iceland
Carl Dainter
Head of aviation
Mace
UK
The expansion of Iceland's aviation offer has kicked off against the backdrop of Covid-19, which has caused the greatest disruption to air travel in history. However, with numbers of visitors to Iceland on the rise after the lifting of travel restrictions, Isavia's decade-long program to bring additional passenger and aircraft capacity to Keflavik Airport is quickly building momentum. The global pandemic has given Isavia the opportunity to consider how program and environmental efficiencies can be enhanced through the application of the operational readiness activation and transition methodology and organizational effectiveness, resulting in the right decisions made, at the right time.

What the audience will learn

  • How to combine ORAT methodology with design and with user experience in mind
  • How teams better integrate through the application of organizational effectiveness
  • Driving a program during a pandemic with recovery and sustainability in mind
  • Operating an airport during a pandemic, with expansion plans underway
  • How to think outside of the construction box to facilitate existing customer experience whilst undergoing airport expansion

10:40

Airport development in the post-Covid era: design for the unknown

Teresa Talavera
Landside coordination project manager
LIMA AIRPORT PARTNERS
Peru
Eduardo Coll Hernandez
Managing partner
Leadin Aviation Consulting
Spain
After almost 20 years of aeronautical traffic growth in the region, Lima airport was ready to design and build its new terminal in 2020. When the Covid-19 pandemic hit the market and changed the industry with unclear traffic forecasts, airlines shutting down operations and many uncertain changes, this encouraged the Lima Airport PMO team to transform all these challenges into multiple opportunities thanks to a design that implements innovative concepts to target a modular, scalable and efficient design that optimizes the infrastructure to adapt it for industry challenges and uncertain traffic.

What the audience will learn

  • How to design and build aeronautical projects in challenging environments
  • Adaptable infrastructure for uncertain contexts
  • Innovative decision making as a PMO team

11:05 - 11:25

Break

11:25

Creating a human-centered, passenger-focused airport reflecting the region it serves

Tom Woodrow
SVP of engineering & intelligent infrastructure
Allegheny County Airport Authority
USA
Pittsburgh International Airport (PIT) engaged world-class teams to incorporate the region’s best assets into the design and construction of a new terminal and multimodal complex opening in 2025. By collaborating with local vendors, trades, small businesses, DBEs, and airlines we are creating a facility built by Pittsburgh for Pittsburgh. When Covid-19 halted construction, PIT held a series of pandemic workshops with healthcare and industry experts resulting in features ensuring the highest standards in public health and safety and outdoor spaces for passengers and workers alike. The project will be powered by a unique microgrid driving resilience, sustainability and efficiency.

What the audience will learn

  • How designs based on local assets are essential to developing a unique sense of place at PIT
  • How this airport is for Pittsburgh, by Pittsburgh: More than 80 percent of the work and materials are local
  • How PIT’s transforming from a hub airport to one that puts O&D passengers first, improving customer experience and efficiency
  • Diversity, equity, and inclusion are core principles, driven into every action and decision within PIT’s terminal modernization program
  • PIT green: LEED Silver and a microgrid that provides 100% of the power needed to operate the airport

11:50

Design and construction of Delta's new terminal at LaGuardia Airport

Ryan Marzullo
Managing director, New York design and construction
Delta Air Lines
USA
In July 2015 Delta Air Lines, in partnership with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, announced the complete reconstruction of its two legacy terminals at LaGuardia Airport as part of the Port Authority's LGA modernization initiative. Costing $4bn and initially planned for ten years of construction, Delta broke ground in 2017 on one of the most complex construction programs at one of the United States' busiest and most congested airports. This presentation will open the door on the majority of Delta's reconfigured, modernized and state-of-the-art new terminal at the premier business airport in New York City.

What the audience will learn

  • The design and functionality of Delta's new terminal at LaGuardia
  • How the construction of the new terminal was phased around a very busy and constrained operation
  • How Delta was able to accelerate construction during the pandemic and shorten the construction schedule by nearly two years

12:15

London Gatwick’s future plans

Cédric Laurier
Chief technical officer
Gatwick Airport Ltd
UK
Gatwick Airport is committed to exploring how to grow sustainably while supporting the local and national economy, improving facilities and continuing to transform services for its passengers. The presentation will discuss what the future holds for London’s second-largest airport and how we will deliver our Northern Runway plans.

What the audience will learn

  • Gatwick’s plan for the future
  • Northern Runway project
  • Sustainable growth
  • Innovation

12:40

Reimagining O'Hare for the 21st century

Robert Hoxie
Managing deputy commissioner/chief development officer
City of Chicago Department of Aviation
USA
Dominic Garascia
Assistant commissioner - design and GIS
City of Chicago Department of Aviation
USA
Having nearly completed a US $10bn airfield realignment program including four new runways and two reconstructed and lengthened runways in the midst of the world's busiest airfield, Chicago O'Hare is now focused on the US $8.5bn terminal area development program (TAP). The TAP program will replace Terminal 2 and integrate existing Terminals 1 and 3 into a facility housing two major airline alliances. This presentation will focus on the overall strategic direction for the airport, the current terminal works in progress and the future development plans.

What the audience will learn

  • The effort and complexity to reconfigure the worlds busiest airfield
  • The redevelopment plan for configuring the terminal complexes to support airline alliance operations
  • The Terminal 5 development status
  • Future terminals design update
  • Collateral development plans for non-aeronautical facilities

13:05 - 14:15

Lunch

14:15

Creating a signature expansion at Helsinki Airport

Timo Järvelä
Vice president, passenger experience and processes
Finavia
Finland
Juho Grönholm
Architect SAFA, Partner
ALA Architects
Finland
The latest expansion of the airport opened to the public in December 2021. The project that started with a design competition launched in 2016 has been built according to BREEAM Excellent standards as one of the country's first alliance projects. The expansion greatly improves the functionality and simplifies the passenger routes at the airport: practically there is now only one terminal. The new entrance building with its warm wooden surfaces creates a strong local identity to the airport. The airport development program aims to serve 30 million customers by year 2030.

What the audience will learn

  • Strategy for having everything under one roof
  • Improving passenger experience and accessibility
  • Strengthening the airport's local identity through design
  • Experiences in sustainable construction

14:40

Getting more out of less

Mookie Patel
Chief business and finance officer
Austin-Bergstrom International Airport
USA
Tim Hudson
Principal
Gensler
USA
Today’s commercial service airports are experiencing unprecedented growth and passenger activity levels that exceed those levels seen before the global pandemic. Airport real estate comes at a premium cost, if it is available at all. Austin-Bergstrom International Airport is modifying and renovating its existing facilities to address increased passenger levels while providing an authentic Austin experience within the existing terminal footprint. This panel will share lessons learned during these challenging times, with a focus on how impacts on ongoing operations and passenger experience will be addressed through design while resolving facility capacity and operational challenges.

What the audience will learn

  • How to create additional operational area without expanding the building
  • How to manage complex terminal renovation projects in an active environment
  • How to develop a phasing plan to maintain terminal operations

15:05

Development of the new Bucharest Brancusi South Airport

Caspar Baum
Director aviation
Surbana Jurong Group, Singapore
Singapore
Bucharest, the capital of Romania, will receive a modern and fully privately owned international airport in the next few years. This airport will be futureproof and be based on the innovative requirements of airlines and airport stakeholders for the upcoming decades. The airport will be part of a new urban development, which will generate opportunities for businesses, employment and social infrastructure.

What the audience will learn

  • Futureproof airport development and innovation
  • Sustainable business plan and green initiatives
  • Integration of stakeholders and the entire airport community
  • Transformation and regeneration of an entire metropolitan area
  • Attraction of technology and innovative systems

15:30 - 15:45

Break

15:45

Kutaisi International Airport: a versatile user-oriented business model

Tamara Archuadze
Director
United Airports of Georgia LLC
Georgia
Frans van Vuure
Director / senior architect
UNStudio
Netherlands
Voted one of the 14 most beautiful airports in the world by Curbed in 2018, Kutaisi International Airport has rapidly grown from 300,000 passengers in 2015 to 2.5m passengers forecasted in 2022. United Airports of Georgia chose to create the recent large extension on the same values as the original design, focusing on the comfort of traveling, being a smart and versatile processor and creating a cultural destination. Emphasizing Georgian hospitality, the airport is much more than a gate to the country. The guest is central in every aspect of the airport’s experience, creating a different terminal experience.

What the audience will learn

  • A user-oriented experience where the health and comfort of every passenger is accommodated through architecture and spatial design
  • Adaptive space that can change over time but which will define the quality of the terminal
  • Consistent sustainable core values create a strong identity for the airport as well as the city

16:10

Western Sydney Airport – a new gateway to Australia

Cristiano Ceccato
Director
Zaha Hadid Architects
UK
Prof David Holm
Architect director
Cox Architecture
Australia
Western Sydney Airport (WSA) is a new greenfield airport in Badgerys Creek in the western district of Sydney. WSA is the only new airport to be constructed in Australia for over a generation and is the largest federal government project under development today. This presentation will showcase how WSA was developed from its inception through to the selection process for the master architect. The audience will learn about the airport's phased growth, and how the design for the terminal is built on sustainable planning principles and modular architecture to create an unmistakable new national gateway to Australia. ZHA and COX were appointed as master architect in late October 2019.

What the audience will learn

  • Airport planning
  • Passenger terminal design
  • Sustainable design
  • Phased development
  • Modular expansion

16:35 - 17:25

Panel discussion: Embracing sense of place within the terminal environment and wayfinding strategies

Airports are symbols of the places they serve. For Ontario International Airport (ONT), it was important to balance the identity of the region and the brand of the airport with the expectations of the terminal experience to differentiate itself from other airports in the region. By integrating sense of place, ONT was able to create an airport ecosystem, from entry to terminal, that doubles as a strategic branding mechanism and a memorable experience reflective of the Inland Empire. This panel will explore how ONT accomplished this from the perspective of executive leadership, planning and customer experience.

What the audience will learn

  • Defining sense of place and its importance to the overall passenger experience in a terminal and campus environment
  • Examples of how this process was applied at Ontario International Airport, including lessons learned for other applications
  • An overview of how to apply sense of place across the journey from airport entry signage to terminal wayfinding
  • Process development and the tools utilized to create a human-centered design response
Atif Elkadi
Chief executive officer
Ontario International Airport
USA
Eren Cello
Director of marketing and communications
Ontario International Airport
USA
Michelle Brantley
Chief planning officer
Ontario International Airport
USA
Tiffany Sanders
Director of customer experience
Ontario International Airport
USA
Panel Moderators:
Scott Gorenc, studio design director, Corgan
Jonathan Massey, aviation sector leader - managing principal, Corgan
Jonathan Massey, Managing Principal, Corgan

Opening Day Party hosted by Groupe ADP. Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Day 2: Thursday, June 16

Airport design, planning and development
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Tim Walder
Senior director and aviation sector leader
Arcadis
UK
Prof David Holm
Architect director
Cox Architecture
Australia

09:05

The new Greek regional airports - open for business

Andreas Karvelas
Chief technical officer
Fraport Regional Airports of Greece Management Company S.A
Greece
Through innovative organization and detailed risk management, Fraport-Greece completed its €450m ‘Imminent Works’ program ahead of schedule and within budget, despite the challenges of difficult island logistics, multiple simultaneous work fronts and a worldwide pandemic. The 14-airport program saw the construction of five new, eight expanded and seven refurbished passenger terminals, as well as a cargo terminal in Thessaloniki. Bill will share the development process from the concession award through to final completion of the capital investment program for 14 all sites, across the entire Greek territory.

What the audience will learn

  • Delivery challenges for capital programs under a typical airport concession model
  • Risk assessment and mitigation for capital program delivery
  • Innovative approaches to airport expansion in constrained sites

09:30

State-of-the-art campus sets a new standard in airline operational excellence

Cagri Aksoy
Project and investments coordinating supervisor
Turkish Airlines
Turkey
Joseph Gonzalez, FAIA
Global director of design
Ghafari Associates LLC
USA
With the development of an all-new airport in Istanbul came the opportunity to plan and design a state-of-the-art operational campus for Turkish Airlines (THY) comprised of over 50 next-generation support facilities. The campus will total over 650,000 square meters (seven million square feet) and set a new standard in airline operational excellence. Our design is not only highly functional but also imparts a unified visual identity that thoughtfully applies the airline’s revamped global brand. Attendees will learn how we incorporated innovative technology and sustainable materials to develop a cohesive design representative of THY’s ambitious growth, corporate rebranding efforts and overall vision.

What the audience will learn

  • How to apply key skills to design complex projects like the seven million square feet 50-building campus for Turkish Airlines
  • Identify and define key elements that are crucial for successful global leadership: management, communication, local office presence and construction management
  • How the use of technology was critical to building consensus among the disciplines involved in the implementation of the campus
  • Understand the methodology and approach behind our design in terms of branding, application of sustainable materials and use of technology

09:55

Developing Copenhagen Airport for the future

Christina Okai Mejborn
Senior master planner
Copenhagen Airports
Denmark
CPH is developing the airport and preparing for future growth – focusing on sustainable solutions and ensuring support from stakeholders. A key element in this process is the articulation of a clear vision for the future of the airport as a tool for strategic decision-making. The presentation will give insights to the current update of the CPH long term master development plan and the Terminal 3 Airside Expansion project, which is currently under construction. Focusing on modularity and flexibility, the vision was key in revising phasing and re-scoping the project as a consequence of the Covid-19 pandemic impact on CPH.

What the audience will learn

  • How CPH works with developing visions for the future as a strategic tool in decision-making and achieving buy-in from stakeholders
  • Overview of CPH master plan and development strategy
  • Status and background on the T3 airside expansion project

10:20 - 10:40

Break

10:40

Understanding ORAT and how it contributes to sustainability

Sarah Talbot
Assistant director ORAT, infrastructure projects
Aéroports de Montréal
Canada
ORAT’s objective is to operate a new facility on day one as if it had been operated for years. Learn how ADM’s ORAT program can contribute to sustainability, as it adds to lifecycle analysis. Including ORAT early in the project decreases the risk of changes during construction and lowers the post-opening modifications, which results in less deconstruction and material loss. It supports commissioning in its attempt to be a cost-effective strategy for reducing energy, costs and GHG emissions in buildings. It includes stakeholders in the process. In short, ADM’s ORAT program helps to make the right project.

What the audience will learn

  • What is ORAT : a quick overviewAcronym's interpretationGoal and objectiveContribution to project management
  • Stakeholder's engagementADM's approach to include stakeholder in infrastructure projects, from planning to delivery
  • ORAT's contribution to environmentADM's commissioning approach to reduce energy, costs and GHG emissions.Less changes, deconstruction and material loss.
  • ORAT's contribution to society How ADM's ORAT programme improves community quality of life, equity and social justice.
  • ORAT's contribution to economyHow ADM's stakeholder engagement programme stimulates economic prosperity and develops local skills and capabilities.

11:05

Operational excellence with next generation airport systems

Aziz Can Aksoyek
Head of sales and business development
TAV Technologies
Turkey
Working on the next generation airport management systems and how to apply cutting-edge technologies such as big data, machine learning, IoT and mobile technologies is crucial to increase operational efficiency in airport operations. To create ‘smart airports’ of the future, airport technology companies bring in new architectural models such as microservices, containers and most up to date approaches such as user experience (UX) and design thinking (DT).

What the audience will learn

  • Improving operational performance and efficiency by adopting big data and machine learning (ML) technologies in airport management systems
  • New optimization methods, AI based suggestion engines and multi-KPI objective functions to meet varying optimization needs and goals of airports
  • Global and holistic view of airport operations with accurate and complete information on flights and resources
  • Modular and flexible software approach to processes to the Total Airport Management (TAM) concept using micro services architecture and containers
  • Empowering UX (User Experience) and Design Thinking (DT) principles to remove the frictions for operational users

11:30 - 12:20

Panel discussion: From operational readiness to operational resiliency through innovation and technology

Operating an airport during the pandemic was trying to say the least. Imagine handling day-to-day operations while constructing and opening new, world-class facilities. This discussion will detail how accomplishing the required ORAT elements by planning and developing the Covid-19 protocols allowed for opening day success. The presentation will discuss leveraging the airport's testing and vaccination infrastructure to maintain the viability of the workforce, the use of innovative technology that lessened the physical interaction and increased the overall connectivity of stakeholder groups, the project protocols used in conjunction with ORAT principles and ultimately working with carriers on opening day protocols.

What the audience will learn

  • How to establish stakeholder working groups for maximum participation and coordination
  • How to effectively use technology to plan, execute and monitor your AOR/ORAT program
  • How to leverage your AOR/ORAT program for maximum benefit
  • How to ensure engagement and collaboration from start to finish
Michael Christensen
Chief operations and maintenance officer
Los Angeles World Airports
USA
Ken Warren
Capital program leader
Sea-Tac Airport, Port of Seattle
USA
Ortez Gude
CEO
Citiri, Inc.
USA
Panel Moderator:
Melvin Price, associate principal, Jacobs

12:20 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

Reconnecting Melbourne

Simon Gandy
Chief of infrastructure
Melbourne Airport
Australia
This session will cover Melbourne Airport's rebuild and relaunch, leaning forward with runway and rail and the green revolution.

What the audience will learn

  • Resilience through and beyond the pandemic
  • Maintaining momentum on legacy shaping infrastructure
  • Taking responsibility for our environmental footprint

14:10

Balancing innovation; a design roadmap for concourse expansion at DEN

Brett Hartle
Director of design and planning
Denver International Airport
USA
Christine Rajpal
Vice president, senior aviation architect
Jacobs
USA
Denver International Airport prioritizes being a world leader in sustainability, but also understands that there is a balance when implementing design decisions which must be viewed through the lens of the entire airport campus as a whole. Sustainability is not a ‘one size fits all’ model, and short-sighted decisions can have long-term consequences for one of the largest airports in the world. The presentation will discuss the design journey for the recent concourse expansions, which paved a roadmap for how DEN will continue to expand while also informing the future retrofit of existing airport facilities.

What the audience will learn

  • Transforming the passenger psyche; innovative digital wayfinding, improved natural daylighting and maximized views can revolutionize the passenger experience
  • Balancing design innovation; weighing competing factors such as cost, schedule, emerging technologies, existing context, maintenance and airline impacts
  • Progressive yet timeless; new concourse expansion designs must consider the compatibility of the existing airport but stay forward-thinking
  • Energy savings vs best value; understanding which HVAC, photovoltaic and technology façade strategies bring more value to the airport
  • Lifecycle analysis; sustainable design strategies and the impact of energy savings, operations and maintenance over time

14:35

Louisville Muhammad Ali International Airport and the future

Dan Mann
Executive director
Louisville Muhammad Ali International Airport
USA
Eric Peterson
Principal
Alliiance
USA
With its US$400m Terminal Transformation Project, Louisville Muhammad Ali International Airport is continuing its reputation as an industry leader in hospitality, efficiency, technology and possibility. With passenger traffic at record highs and with new air service options, the airport is expanding its capacity and level of service from curb to gate with state-of-the-art amenities and convenience. Sustainability is at the forefront, featuring the largest geothermal system of any airport in the USA. The project aims to achieve a 45% reduction in energy use, resulting in 60% combined utility savings due to lighting/controls geothermal and envelope improvements.

What the audience will learn

  • How to develop a holistic vision encompassing all aspects of passenger experience – and a road map to the future
  • Navigating high growth periods and balancing shifting short- and long-term needs
  • Empowering airport staff and consultant partners to exceed expectations and lift each other up in common purpose
  • Sustainability strategies
  • Balancing the needs of one of the world’s largest cargo airports with a vibrant commercial passenger facility

15:00

The new Aile Est at Geneva Airport

André Schneider
CEO
Genève Aéroport
Switzerland
Stephen Barrett
Partner
Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners
UK
The new Aile Est, assembled with the precision of a Swiss Watch, heralds a new generation of piers. The building offers an unparalleled quality of passenger experience for arriving and departing passengers, a colorful journey that benefits from unparalleled views and proximity to the aircraft. Furthermore, this project aims to improve the reception of passengers on intercontinental flights by responding to the standard of a high-level sustainable building (with over 100 geothermal probes and 7,000 square meters of solar panels).

What the audience will learn

  • Long-haul at Geneva: a new gateway to Switzerland
  • How constraints led to innovation: a pier that floats above the head of the stand road leaning toward the aircraft
  • First impressions matter – the arriving passenger experience: mountains, Toblerone and precision Swiss engineering
  • Wayfinding and identity: how color can help you navigate and rekindle the joy of travel
  • An energy-positive airport building: solar panels, geothermal probes, heat pumps, rainwater recovery, optimized daylight, triple glazing

15:25 - 15:45

Break

15:45

YVR’s new gates bring the outdoors inside

Nancy Stern
In-house architect
Vancouver Airport Authority
Canada
Martin Nogger
Senior associate, transportation leader
Kasian Architecture, Interior Design and Planning
Canada
YVR’s latest international departures and arrivals expansion was completed in 2021. The area integrates new contact gates with an enhanced RSO gate experience. It also includes new passenger amenities and space for future concessions. YVR’s bold sustainability goals challenged the design team to develop enhanced building envelope detailing, while continuing YVR’s signature terminal design. Showcasing the natural beauty of British Columbia, the expansion features a west coast island experience, kelp images, tidal pools and outdoor landscaped rockwork with Hemlock trees layered with a new immersive digital experience.

What the audience will learn

  • Integrating contact and RSO gates within a limited footprint and apron area
  • Enhancing passenger amenities – concessions, lounge seating, power charging, quiet room, prayer room, yoga space
  • Setting new YVR standard for sustainability in building envelope design
  • |Integrating digital and thematic installations to create a passenger experience showcasing the region’s natural environment
  • Phased construction working alongside an active airport and adding COVID protocols for the final stages of construction

16:10

Monterey Regional Airport new terminal concept

Michael LaPier
Executive director
Monterey Peninsula Airport District
USA
Thomas Schnetzer
Vice president
Kimley-Horn
USA
Monterey Regional Airport, located in a spectacular part of California and home to the world-famous Pebble Beach Golf Course, is moving its passenger terminal to adapt to a larger aircraft fleet and evolving safety standards. This is an opportunity to reimagine a brand-new terminal, planning and designing it for ultimate flexibility, incorporating sustainable features, and taking into account an aging population with a growing desire for air travel. Doing all this on a very constrained site is challenging, but has pushed the team to think innovatively.

What the audience will learn

  • What design features are important for a aging population that is very mobile
  • How to maximize a terminal site and balance airside, terminal building and landside needs
  • How to build a sense of place into a terminal plan at an early stage
  • How trends in airline aircraft fleet planning informs terminal planning
  • What is important while working on a site in an environmentally sensitive area

16:35 - 17:25

Panel discussion: No directions required - improving operations and wayfinding through the terminal

Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) is in the process of investing over US$15bn in new facilities aimed at improving landside access and operational efficiency while elevating guest experience through improved amenities. Integral to this transformation is the renaming of multiple terminals and the renumbering of approximately 150 gates at LAX to align more intuitively with airline alliances. The strategy implemented today will define operations for decades. Come, listen, and share as our panel discusses the strategy and logistics of this transition, including case studies and best practices pulled from other airports.

What the audience will learn

  • Best foot forward - a governance structure that spans static, digital and the content management system
  • Asking for directions - benchmarks and case studies from airports and other industries
  • Navigation - which stakeholders and agencies are responsible, accountable, consulted or informed
  • Familiar landmarks - the use of virtual reality as a powerful tool to document and catalog your inventory
  • You have arrived - campus-wide change or phased roll out; how many phases and what the implications are
Robert Schultz
Chief of airport planning - LAX terminals
Los Angeles World Airports
USA
Faith Varwig
IT strategist
Faith Group LLC
USA
Panel Moderator:
Justin Wortman, regional leader for aviation and transportation, HOK

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS ceremony and celebration. Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Day 3: Friday, June 17

Airport design, planning and development
09:00 - 13:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Tim Walder
Senior director and aviation sector leader
Arcadis
UK
Prof David Holm
Architect director
Cox Architecture
Australia

09:05

Reorganization of terminals 2B and 2D

Rachid El Moussaoui
Lead architect
Groupe ADP
France
Thimotée Berger
Architect, deputy head of architecture and design department
Groupe ADP
France
The presentation will cover Groupe ADP's renovation of Terminal 2B and expansion of the airside for the separation of international passenger processing: departures and arrivals; the creation of a link building between 2B and 2D to pool the functions of controls, baggage delivery, shopping areas and lounges; the complete redevelopment of the link module (Module L) with retail spaces; and the complete energy renovation of buildings (envelopes and facades, fluid technical installations, HVAC, etc).

What the audience will learn

  • Architectural ambition
  • Renovation of emblematic existing terminals
  • The passenger process
  • BIM methods
  • Communication

09:30

The revamping of Milan Linate Airport

Alessandro Fidato
Chief operating officer
SEA Milan Airports
Italy
In June 2021, Linate Airport inaugurated its restyling after important revamping works that began in 2019 and have completely renovated the Milan city airport. The project has involved architectural and functional refurbishment with a substantial change in passenger flows in a considerable part of the existing terminal (including check-in, security and duty-free areas) – 5,400 square meters – together with the building of a new three-story building (Corpo F) – 10,000 square meters – with a new shopping gallery and a new food court with a total investment of €40m including relevant technological innovation, such as SEA face boarding.

What the audience will learn

  • Iconic – design an authentic Milanese experience through furniture and shopping
  • Technology – touchless journey through digitalization for a safer and faster security experience
  • Sustainability – energy saving, health and well-being of users, waste management and environmental pollution

09:55

Helsinki Airport Development Program – Passenger Terminal Processor Capacity Simulation

Sami Kiiskinen
Vice president - airport development
Helsinki Airport, Finavia Corporation
Finland
Piet Ringersma
Senior airport architect
NACO, Netherlands Airport Consultants
Netherlands
The most extensive expansion project in the history of Helsinki Airport will finish in 2023. Finavia’s giant investment program allows the airport to serve 30 million passengers annually. The expansion program includes an increase in terminal capacity to accommodate future growth. Successful discussion on terminal capacity between the airport and airlines requires a simulation approach to discuss various terminal design layouts and what-if scenarios on different allocation strategies. The presentation will show how we conducted terminal simulations for various scenarios to showcase the terminal capacity, which facilitated the seamless discussion between Finavia and the airlines at Helsinki.

What the audience will learn

  • Insight into the development of the Helsinki Airport Development Program
  • Challenges faced in airport capacity discussions
  • Various approaches to undertake terminal capacity assessments
  • Implementation of the terminal simulation approach
  • Understanding the terminal simulation as a tool for stakeholder discussion

10:20

Collecting data for digital twin creation at Prague Airport

Daniel Šmejkal
Head of VDC
Prague Airport
Czech Republic
Sascha Kuehner
Director of sales
Revizto
Switzerland
Prague airport took the Covid-19 lockdown as an opportunity to map its existing terminal buildings and create digital twins. The airport collected data in the field and kept this organized for easy further processing.

What the audience will learn

  • Digital twin creation using historical drawings and ‘as build information’
  • Combining point clouds, BIM models and drawings
  • Digital collaboration from the design in the construction and the operation
  • How to report on all project tasks in one platform
  • How an integrated collaboration platform can help transform your airport business

10:45

When geodata ‘paves’ the road to airports’ design and planning

Eva Tsiliakou
Senior project manager for corporate strategy and digitalization, strategy lead sustainability
Fraport Greece
Greece
The aviation industry and airport authorities' interest in safe and operative airports is continually growing. Safety enhancement in aviation constitutes smooth airport operations, which are the essence of each operator's concern. Airports are living organisms continuously evolving, transforming and expanding as required by capacity and traffic forecast needs. Planning airport operations and facilities (airside, landside and terminal), short term or long term should encompass operations needs and serve commercial aspects, which should all be aligned with safety requirements, fully comply with EASA regulations and face the many challenges and risks the endless airfield entails.

What the audience will learn

  • The investigation of these challenges is based on topographic data. Nowadays ge information is provided by state-of-the-art tools
  • Presentation of the Fraport Greece experience with geodata applied when planning and design face airside challenges
  • Looking back to the challenging 5-year period of the imminent works (2017-2021), there are many lessons learned
  • Airport geographic information has assisted Fraport Greece in decision making and in complex design studies with long-term impact
  • In the 5th year of concession and towards future works, Fraport Greece plans new aerial surveys and new obstacle assessments

11:10 - 11:25

Break

11:25

Leveraging modular construction to lower costs and elevate passenger experiences

Mohamed Charkas
Airport development SVP
DFW International Airport
USA
Matt Needham
Director of aviation and transportation
HOK
USA
Major airport construction projects can present significant operational challenges that impact cost, schedules and the passenger experience. Modular construction methods may be the solution for smoother, cleaner and less disruptive construction. By maximizing preassembled materials and unitized components for airport facilities, everything from concourses to restrooms and concession units could be designed and assembled offsite and quickly swapped out for upgraded units throughout the life of the facility. This approach minimizes disruptions to airport operations, offers more opportunities for the labor market, reduces trade overlap and provides heightened efficiency and construction safety.

What the audience will learn

  • The evolution of offsite construction methods in airport design
  • Examples of modular construction concepts currently in the works with airports
  • The benefits of modular construction, including minimized disruptions to airport operations, schedule advantages, heightened efficiencies, labor market opportunities and more

11:50

Building a new terminal while in flight

Heather Leide
Director, airport development
Metropolitan Airports Commission
USA
Kerry Bruggemann
Principal of sales
Michaud Cooley Erickson
USA
Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport (MSP) is designing a new terminal without relocating. With only a 15ft expansion and a new parking ramp, MSP is completing a US$1bn renovation and expansion, reinventing the entire facility. During construction, MSP has hosted some of the largest events – the Super Bowl, Final Four and PGA tournaments – while looking to reinvent the building as simply and efficiently as possible within its 1960s framework. The MSP director of airport development and Michaud Cooley Erickson MEP principal are excited to present the unique collaboration to make this all happen and enlighten the audience with best practices learned.

What the audience will learn

  • MSP utilized staff, volunteers and consultants to integrate with passengers, creating the most welcoming and friendly experience amid the construction
  • MSP integrated many unique technologies including blast mitigation, hearing loops, HVAC upgrades and plumbing water savings to execute this project
  • During this program, MSP increased passenger flow and optimized vertical circulation to make the passenger experience seamless
  • The program created a synergy of services (restrooms, concessions, etc), consolidating and combining the baggage claim and ticket lobby
  • Increasing passengers meant increases in parking. MSP built a state-of-the-art parking ramp to help improve the passenger experience

12:15

Cargo apron rehabilitation at an operationally intensive facility

Eli Shporn
Airport project engineer
Israel Airport Authority (IAA)
Israel
Lyor Dahan
Director of airport planning
DY Consultants
USA
Apron Bravo is the main cargo apron at Ben Gurion Tel Aviv International Airport. It recently underwent a massive rehabilitation program and stands reconfiguration to accommodate aircraft up to the B747-8. Because of its location on the airport, and the crucial role it plays in the system, it was paramount to provide phasing plans to minimize disruption of cargo operations. Parking and operational plans for each phase of the program were prepared. Constant coordination with cargo operators, tenants, ground handling agents, contractors' representatives and airport staff were needed throughout the project to deliver the product on time and on budget.

What the audience will learn

  • Challenges associated with construction on an operationally intensive facility
  • Lessons learned and recommendations to ensure a successful project delivery
  • Testing and commissioning the ramp towards delivery. An ORAT of its own
  • Not to underestimate the need for detailed interim parking and operations plans for each phase
  • To avoid planning to minimum standards

12:40

ACI/ACC/AGC Airport Owners’ Guide to Project Delivery Systems , 3rd edition

Christopher Oswald
Senior vice president, safety & regulatory affairs
Airports Council International-North America
USA
Steve Riano
Global aviation division manager
Bechtel Corporation
USA
The ACI/ACC/AGC Airport Owners’ Guide to Project Delivery Systems was developed in 2006 and updated in 2012 by a joint committee of the Airports Council International-North America (ACI-NA), Airport Consultants Council (ACC) and the Associated General Contractors of America (AGC). The Guide assists airport owners with making appropriate delivery method decisions; development professionals with supporting the owner’s project delivery role; and procurement practitioners in executing contracting processes. The recently completed 3rd Edition of the Guide includes updates to address new developments since 2012, with particular emphasis on significant changes to the industry as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic.

What the audience will learn

  • Review of project delivery systems and procurement methods definitions, including Design-Bid-Build, Construction Management at-Risk and Traditional/Progressive Design-Build.
  • Selection of the appropriate project delivery system, including ability to use alternative systems, risk exposure and shifting roles/responsibilities
  • Implementation of the chosen project delivery system, including owner resources readiness, contract types, contract language, and Covid-19 contract implications
  • Financing of the chosen project delivery system, including linking financing to project delivery and innovative financing such as PPP
  • Emerging trends shaping project delivery systems decisions including alternative contracting methods and technologies/processes to assist with project delivery

13:05 - 15:00

Lunch

Airport design, planning and development – Middle East and Asia

Day 3: Friday, June 17

Airport design, planning and development – Middle East and Asia
09:00 - 13:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Ashwini Thorat
Head of design and planning
Noida International Airport
India
Satyaki Raghunath
Chief strategy and development officer
Bangalore International Airport Limited
India

09:05

MATAR’s dual airport operations strategy for FIFA World Cup Qatar

Ioannis Metsovitis
Senior vice president operations
Hamad International Airport (MATAR)
Qatar
MATAR, running the operational and management functions of Qatar’s two airports: Hamad International Airport (HIA) and Doha International Airport (DIA), will make history as a single airport operator welcoming the majority of FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 visitors, linking football fans to stadiums and football games across Qatar. It is prepared to provide its visitors with a smooth travel experience and ensure operational efficiency. This presentation will explain how MATAR has prepared to achieve this feat through stakeholder collaboration, a multiphased HIA expansion project, refurbishment projects and various procedural enhancements, to ultimately deliver a World Cup like no other.

What the audience will learn

  • The significance of MATAR being the single airport operator welcoming the majority of World Cup Qatar 2022 visitors
  • MATAR’s strategy for dual airport operations at DOH and DIA during world cup passenger peak including procedural enhancements and refurbishments
  • HIA’s airport expansion: added services and facilities at the world-class airport and its impact on World Cup visitor capacity
  • How MATAR will ensure operational efficiency and readiness for the occasion by working hand-in-hand with airport stakeholders and event organizers
  • MATAR’s plans to handle different passenger groups in line with World Cup requirements

09:30

Bahrain Airport – challenges, strategy and success

Mohamed Al Binfalah
Chief executive officer
Bahrain Airport Company
Bahrain
Operations were transferred seamlessly to Bahrain International Airport’s (BIA) new passenger terminal on 28 January 2021, positioning BIA as the most modern boutique airport in the region. The move is part of the Airport Modernization Program (AMP), one of the most important national development projects in Bahrain’s history. Ahead of the transfer, Bahrain Airport Company and its partners successfully completed the National Operations Readiness and Airport Transfer (ORAT) program, paving the way for a smooth transition despite the challenges of COVID-19. The second phase of the AMP includes the launch of a new private aviation terminal that will enhance level of service provided to VIPs, business leaders, and private jet owners traveling through BIA. This phase also includes the launch of a fuel farm complex that will position Bahrain as a prominent and sophisticated aviation fuel services hub in the region.

What the audience will learn

  • BIA's success story in transferring the operation seamlessly
  • The main strategic points in building a boutique airport
  • Overcoming challenges during Covid-19

09:55 - 11:10

Panel discussion: Airports – growth and development - the way forward

The panel will discuss the challenges and performance of airports in the region during/post-pandemic and how the region led global recovery, as well as the key trends affecting airport passenger terminal processing and growth, the impact of Covid-19 on operations, airport development plans, strategies employed to boost passenger confidence, new health requirements and ways to spur traffic activity.

What the audience will learn

  • Airport crisis and pandemic management
  • Airport capacity rationalization
  • Bringing non-standard stakeholders – such as health, medical, vaccine – into the aviation ecosystem
  • Digital credentials and innovation
  • Travel passes
Aimen Ahmed Al Hosni
CEO
Oman Airports
Oman
Mohamed Al Binfalah
Chief executive officer
Bahrain Airport Company
Bahrain
Mohammed Al-mowkley
CEO
Matarat Holding
Saudi Arabia
Panel Moderator:
Kashif Khalid, regional director - Middle East and Africa, IATA

11:10 - 11:25

Break

11:25

Regional connectivity scheme, with a particular focus on India

Nandita Bhatt
Airport director, Udaipur Airport - GM architect
Airports Authority of India (AAI)
India
As the Indian economy grows, consumption-led growth in populated metros is expected to spill over to hinterland areas. This is also expected to be due to production becoming more expensive in the densely populated metro cities. In this scenario, air connectivity can provide the required impetus to the economic growth of regional centers. In this context, one of the key objectives of NCAP 2016 is to ‘establish an integrated ecosystem that will lead to significant growth of the civil aviation sector’.

What the audience will learn

  • Geographical spread: how the vast country is connecting various regions
  • Collaborations: government, state governments, operators and airlines
  • Giving new meaning to air connectivity; minimum cost
  • Resource management: using existing airstrips; upgrading or revival
  • Employment generator

11:50

Development of airports in second-tier cities in India

Janhavi Poul
Deputy general manager
Adani Airports Holdings
India
This presentation will cover the development of airports in Tier 2 cities in India with upcoming project examples. The presentation will highlight the technological challenges and the development of these airports in terms of traffic diversions from major airports and commercial modeling to attract traffic, in addition to highlighting how digital technology innovations and dual airport strategy will promote a sustainable approach for these airports.

What the audience will learn

  • A sustainable approach for designing smaller airports
  • Dual use of small airports
  • Green terminal design - eco design
  • Commercial/retail modeling for the small airport
  • Use of technological innovation in the smaller airport

12:15

Noida International Airport: where Indian hospitality meets Swiss efficiency

Oliver Hebeisen
Design manager terminal
Noida International Airport (NIA)
Germany
Andrew Thomas
Partner
Grimshaw Architects
UK
The most populous state in India, Uttar Pradesh, is exemplified by lush green landscapes, outdoor living and vibrant, colorful, cultural and retail experiences. When the Zurich Airport-led team commenced work on Delhi Noida’s new airport they had a simple but bold ambition – to create a new airport that would be the perfect synthesis of Indian hospitality with Swiss efficiency, placing passenger and visitor comfort and well-being at the heart of the airport experience. Discover from senior leaders of the team how this vision has come to life in the design of India’s latest private airport development

What the audience will learn

  • Collaborative global working on a unique, net zero energy airport terminal which responds to local culture and identity
  • Placing people first by making all passenger journeys clear, intuitive and convenient with integrated digital technologies that ease passenger stress
  • Sense of place – a celebration of the green, lush environment of Noida through the exploration of landscaping and internal biophilia
  • A vibrant and colorful commercial environment which includes a covered forecourt for arriving and departing passengers and visitors alike
  • Dispensing with the traditional landside arrival and departures ‘two-level viaduct’ approach, reimagining the relationship between the terminal and vehicular access

12:40

Kaohsiung International Airport new terminal – Taiwan's southern gateway

Chun-Yuo Chen
Section chief, aerodrome engineering division
Civil Aeronautics Administration, Ministry of Transportation and Communications, Taiwan
Taiwan
David Lee
Director of international affairs
JJP Architects & Planners
Taiwan
Kaohsiung International Airport (KHH) is about to undergo its most ambitious transformation since completion. The new masterplan calls for the replacement of the existing international and domestic terminals with a new, state-of-the-art passenger terminal, three concourses and a ground transportation center, totaling over 240,000m2 of floor area, all under one undulating roof. The design emphasizes sustainability and resilience along with a focus on passenger experience to create a distinct sense of place. Construction will be in two phases in order to meet the challenge of keeping the airport in operation during construction.

What the audience will learn

  • Overview of the new terminal project
  • Design highlights of the terminal
  • How the project will be constructed while the airport remains operational

13:05

Terminal 3 expansion at Narita Airport

Yusuke Kato
Senior manager
Narita International Airport Corporation
Japan
Terminal 3 is the dedicated LCC terminal at Narita Airport, which opened in 2015 with a capacity of 7.5 million passengers a year. The steady growth of the LCC market in Japan has caused severe congestion at T3. It has been decided to expand the terminal to double the capacity and enhance the passenger experience with the concept of the LCC terminal. The access walkway from Terminal 2 will be replaced by a wider and safer corridor and the distance between the terminals will be shortened. The passenger experience will be improved dramatically by introducing a hold baggage screening system, self-bag-drop equipment and smart security.

What the audience will learn

  • How to expand the existing terminal
  • The enhanced passenger experience at the LCC terminal
  • The latest information on Narita Airport

13:30 - 15:00

Lunch

Airport management and recovery

Day 3: Friday, June 17

Airport management and recovery
09:00 - 13:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Sujata Suri
Vice president strategy and commercial development
Hamad International Airport (MATAR)
Qatar

09:05 - 09:45

Panel discussion: Balancing stakeholder relationships during Covid recovery

Collaboration is key to aid recovery from the pandemic. This session will take a close look at the key factors integrated into balancing stakeholder relationships to drive forward the common goal of providing the best experiences and outcomes for customers. There will also be a glance at the general topic of customer experience and how agile the management of CX had to be during 2020 and 2021 to adapt to the changing needs of customers.

What the audience will learn

  • Balancing the needs of all stakeholders through the transition
  • How to take the guesswork out of what passengers want
  • Re-building confidence in travel with passengers
  • Examples of unique customer experience initiatives
  • How the pandemic has accelerated change in customer experience management
Kathy Haley
Chief customer experience officer – aviation
Port Authority of New York and New Jersey
USA
Claire Donnellan
Director
Customer Centric Consulting
Australia
Panel Moderator:
Sevda Fevzi, associate, customer experience and business development, Modalis Infrastructure Partners Inc.

09:45

BLQ vs Covid-19: lessons learned from an ‘antifragile’ experience

Nazareno Ventola
CEO and MD
Aeroporto G. Marconi di Bologna SpA
Italy
The presentation will discuss Bologna Airport's experience of fighting the Covid-19 battle and envisioning the future: ‘from resilience to an antifragile experience’.

What the audience will learn

  • A successful airport story
  • Then came the storm
  • Resilience is not enough

10:15

A conversation on leadership

Candace McGraw
CEO
CVG Airport
USA
Roelof-Jan (RJ) Steenstra
President and CEO
Fort McMurray International Airport
Canada
A discussion between Candace McGraw, CEO of CVG Airport, and RJ Steenstra, CEO of Fort McMurray Airport. Leading successful teams requires committed, transparent leadership. A culture that embraces the need for adaptation results in a business that can survive fires, dehubbing, financial struggles - and even pandemics.

What the audience will learn

  • A Conversation on Leadership: a fireside discussion between Candace McGraw, CEO of CVG Airport, and RJ Steenstra, CEO of Fort McMurray Airport.
  • Leading successful teams requires committed, transparent servant leadership.
  • A culture that embraces the need for adaptation results in a business that can survive fires, dehubbing, financial struggles—and even pandemics.

10:45 - 11:05

Break

11:05

Facilities management as a strategy for resiliency, sustainability and pandemic recovery

Mike Tasker
Senior manager for facilities and infrastructure
Port of Seattle
USA
David Tomber
Director, strategic consulting
Woolpert
USA
This session will focus on facilities management as a strategy for resiliency, sustainability and pandemic recovery. It will cover the following key themes: resiliency planning for critical infrastructure; sustainability, including HVAC systems and technologies for air exchange, filters, building controls and analytics, air purification technologies, and energy considerations; virtual queuing and physical distancing tools; touchless technologies, including creative, less expensive solutions; and pandemic recovery, health testing, documents checks, facility evolution, and preparation for future shocks to the aviation industry.

What the audience will learn

  • Resiliency planning for critical infrastructure, looking holistically at potential shocks and stresses
  • HVAC systems and technologies for air exchange, filters, building controls and analytics, air purification technologies, and energy considerations
  • Innovative approaches to virtual queuing, physical distancing and touchless technologies while maintaining a high level of service for passengers
  • Pandemic recovery, health testing, document checks, facility evolution, and preparation for future shocks to the aviation industry
  • Facility evolution, including shifting non-essential facilities outside the terminal and space reallocation

11:35

Adaptation and innovation in airports as a response to pandemics

Eva Valenzuela Marti
Deputy COO
Groupe ADP
France
Due to the great impact that the Covid-19 crisis has had on the airport sector, the aim of the presentation is to show, based on the experience within the ADP group, how to adapt the operation of airports to comply with all health regulations and protect our passengers and workers. This has been done by using innovative tools to minimize the impact on airport operations and the quality of service with which we welcome our passengers. One of the lessons learned has been the construction of a health network including all the group's airports.

What the audience will learn

  • The impact of the pandemic on the airport operations
  • How to adapt the airport operations to all the new sanitary measures
  • How to build a sanitary network including all the airports of the group

12:00

Applying 9/11 aviation security lessons learnt to Covid-19 recovery

Nathalie Herbelles
Senior director, security and facilitation
Airports Council International
Canada
Ashley Reeve
Aviation advisory
Arup
UK
For aviation, the response to the Covid-19 pandemic has been the same as that triggered by 9/11 – the imposition of prescribed, disproportionate to risk, one-size-fits-all measures with adverse impacts on operations. As the industry recovers, it is imperative that the shift to a risk-based approach is made now and that health authorities do not make the same mistakes as the security authorities. We will speak about the ten lessons learned from the security experience that airports and health authorities should apply for Covid-19 industry recovery and sustainable and sensible health risk management in aviation.

What the audience will learn

  • Five security lessons learned that should be applied in airports for Covid-19 recovery and long-term health risk management
  • Five security lessons learned that health authorities should adopt for Covid-19 recovery and long-term health risk management in aviation
  • How aviation health authorities can avoid making the same mistakes it has taken aviation security 20 years to learn from
  • A risk-based approach provides business benefits beyond health and security outcomes
  • The Covid-19 pandemic response has been the same as that triggered by 9/11 – it’s not good

12:30 - 13:20

Panel discussion: What have we learned from Covid-19 and how are we continuing to adapt?

We will discuss what has been learned from the pandemic so far, how it has affected different areas of airport operations and how passenger behaviors have changed. How airport and airlines are continuing to adapt and apply lessons learned during recovery. What the continuing challenges are and how they are being addressed going forward.
Panelists to be announced
Na1
Panel Moderator:
Sujata Suri, vice president strategy and commercial development, Hamad International Airport (MATAR)

13:20 - 14:00

Lunch

Aviation security, border control and facilitation

Day 1: Wednesday, June 15

Aviation security, border control and facilitation
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Art Kosatka
CEO
TranSecure
USA
Dr Jean Salomon
Principal
JSCP Consulting Partners
France
Neville Hay
Director of training
Interportpolice
UK
Philipp Kriegbaum
Retired senior aviation security expert
Philipp Kriegbaum
Germany

09:05

Aviation security spotlight

Hany Bakr
SVP aviation and maritime security
MedAire, an International SOS Company
USA
Hany will discuss the current and envisaged global dynamics and conflict zones and their impact on civil aviation, mobility and air travel. Overflying conflict zones and the constant change in the airspace risks and its influence on the aviation sector.

What the audience will learn

  • The progressive challenges affecting the aviation sector and air travel
  • The value and powerful impact of air carrier’s aviation security risk management professionals
  • The great efforts civil aviation is undertaking to re-emerge from the COVID-19 era

09:30 - 10:35

Panel discussion: Current affairs – recovery and restart and right now

Where is aviation today and how can we collaborate for recovery? How will the Russia-Ukraine conflict affect recovery and security? We will look at identifying the challenges and what can be done to overcome them, including the length of recovery, the impact on the security infrastructure and staffing, the development and cost of technology, revised routing and passenger demand. Is regulatory structure created for where the industry is now going or is it time for the industry to take the reins?
Nathalie Herbelles
Senior director, security and facilitation
Airports Council International
Canada
Mark Rodmell
Deputy executive secretary
European Civil Aviation Conference
France
Keith Goll
Deputy assistant administrator
Transportation Security Administration
USA
Hany Bakr
SVP aviation and maritime security
MedAire, an International SOS Company
USA
Ángeles Pozo
European security expert - APCS
IATA
Spain
Panel Moderators:
Neville Hay, director of training, Interportpolice
Jean Salomon, principal, JSCP Consulting Partners

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

Insider threat – our common responsibility

Tarald Johansen
Director safety, security, quality and contingency
Avinor
Norway
Due to global, European and Norwegian threat assessments, Avinor has done some work on insider threat. Based on the threat picture, we made an airport-specific assessment identifying the risk of insider threat at our airports. We have arranged workshops together with the police, the police secret service, national security agency and representatives from all 43 airports. Together, we have identified vulnerabilities and addressed measures to mitigate the risk.

What the audience will learn

  • What is insider threat?
  • Who is the insider?
  • Where could it happen?
  • How to mitigate the risk from insider threat
  • How to secure passengers and employees from insider threat

11:15

TSA confronts the threat of unmanned aircraft systems

Austin Gould
Requirements and capabilities analysis (RCA) assistant administrator
Transportation Security Administration (TSA)
USA
TSA established the Counter-Unmanned Aircraft System (C-UAS) Technology Program to meet the critical requirements for addressing the rapidly expanding global UAS threat. In recent years, UAS technologies have posed an increased threat to the nation’s critical infrastructure. This necessitates improved security technologies to effectively detect, track, identity, and (under controlled situations and authorities) mitigate unauthorized UAS events at critical infrastructure. The C-UAS program ensures TSA is routinely ready to address rapidly evolving and dynamic UAS threats to infrastructure.

What the audience will learn

  • The C-UAS Technology Program continuously updates and disseminates knowledge learned through its testbeds, delivering data to technology developers
  • TSA conducts research, testing and evaluation on UAS at two innovation airports, which will model testing and testbed designs
  • Testbed designs collect data from UAS equipment and analyze it against vendor claims to determine efficacy

11:35

Aviation security cybersecurity – a global effort to be compliant

Eric Vautier
Group CISO
Groupe ADP
France
Cybersecurity applied to aviation security is a joint effort involving airports, manufacturers, test laboratories, regulators, etc. No one can be successful without the others. After detailing the complexities of the topic, Eric will call for action for all stakeholders to reach compliance together.

What the audience will learn

  • The 360° view of the problem
  • How to achieve cybersecurity through compliance
  • The action list for each stakeholder

11:55 - 12:25

Panel discussion: Evolving threats and risk management

The primary objective of the aviation security strategy is to prevent acts of unlawful interference to civil aviation, including passengers, crew, staff, airlines and the airport infrastructure. The panel will discuss current and possible future threats and how technology and working together can mitigate the risks.
Austin Gould
Requirements and capabilities analysis (RCA) assistant administrator
Transportation Security Administration (TSA)
USA
Eric Vautier
Group CISO
Groupe ADP
France
Tarald Johansen
Director safety, security, quality and contingency
Avinor
Norway
Panel Moderators:
Art Kosatka, CEO, TranSecure
Philipp Kriegbaum, retired senior aviation security expert, Philipp Kriegbaum

12:25 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

Project DARTMOUTH - A Pangiam and Google Cloud collaboration

Richard Grime
Head of customer engineering, UKI Public Sector
Google Cloud
UK
Alexis Long
Chief strategy officer
Pangiam
UK
Pangiam, in collaboration with Google Cloud, has announced details of Project DARTMOUTH, a joint initiative to transform airport security operations using advanced computer vision, artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies. The presentation will detail the latest developments and how these technologies can deliver a step change in security operations.

What the audience will learn

  • The latest developments on Project DARTMOUTH
  • How AI/ML technologies can unlock transformative opportunities in security
  • How to get involved in Project DARTMOUTH
  • What airports and security authorities should consider when upgrading checkpoint hardware
  • The importance of open architecture in procurement

14:15 - 15:15

Panel discussion: Open architecture and AI at the checkpoint

Richard Grime
Head of customer engineering, UKI Public Sector
Google Cloud
UK
Matthew Gilkeson
Director, Innovation Task Force
Transportation Security Administration (TSA)
USA
Phil Dykins
Head of aviation security regulation
UK Civil Aviation Authority
UK
Marie Duffy
Head of capital AGS
AGS Airports
UK
Panel Moderator:
Alexis Long, chief strategy officer, Pangiam

15:15 - 15:35

Break

15:35 - 16:25

Panel discussion: Project SATIE: improving the cybersecurity of the baggage handling system

Security of Air Transport Infrastructure of Europe (SATIE) aims to develop an interoperable toolkit that will help improve cyber-physical correlations, forensic investigations and dynamic impact assessment at airports. With a focus on airport baggage handling systems, project consortium members will together explain the approach, testing, simulations and tools used in the SATIE project to validate the efficiency and interoperability between existing systems and enhanced security solutions to ensure more efficient threat prevention, threat and anomaly detection, incident response and impact mitigation of cyber threats against airport baggage handling systems.

What the audience will learn

  • The importance of risk analysis in developing targeted cybersecurity defensives of a baggage handling system
  • Strong supplier/customer collaboration is critical to developing robust security toolkits
  • Cyberattack – it is no longer a question of if; it is a matter of when
  • The advantages of a security operation center (SOC) in monitoring the critical infrastructure of an airport
  • Simulating cyberattacks using a BHS ‘digital twin’ to provide dynamic impact assessment and learnings
Thomas Oudin
Project manager
Airbus CyberSecurity
France
Sven Hrastnik
Head of hardware support
International Zagreb Airport Jsc
Croatia
Filipe Apolinário
Technical leader cybersecurity unit
INOV
Portugal
Éric Hervé
Chief information security officer
Alstef Group
France
Panel Moderator:
Tim Stelkens-Kobsch, aviation security researcher, German Aerospace Center (DLR)

16:25

Leading the UK on SeMS

Adam Spurling
Compliance team manager - SeMS
UK Civil Aviation Authority
UK
The presentation will highlight the growing number of airports in the UK making use of SeMS.

What the audience will learn

  • A background to the UK SeMS framework
  • Why we are encouraging industry to develop a SeMS when, within the UK it is not a regulatory requirement
  • What benefits have been seen within the UK from the implementation of a SeMS
  • How do I see SeMS developing and what is next for the UK CAA

16:45

Security Management System (collaborated efforts)

Asma Yahya Al-Dhakhri
Senior manager security and facilitation
Oman Airports Management Company
Oman
The presentation will focus on the importance of creating SeMS at the airport level to assure compliance to national and international requirements and setting a smooth security operation in collaboration with all stakeholders. I will discuss the oversight system that has to be created to assure compliance levels to the SeMS.

What the audience will learn

  • The importance of having one umbrella under which all stakeholders work
  • Importance of unifying terminologies and concepts
  • Creating a strong oversight system at the airport (ICAO 8 critical elements)
  • Key success factors to run smooth operation with stakeholders engagement

17:05 - 17:30

Panel discussion: Security management systems – what’s the advantage for airports?

The outcome of a security management system is the development of a positive security culture. ICAO introduced GASeP – the Global Aviation Security Plan – with the objective of enhancing the overall effectiveness of aviation security worldwide. The panel will share their experience and the benefits of SeMS programs.
Asma Yahya Al-Dhakhri
Senior manager security and facilitation
Oman Airports Management Company
Oman
Adam Spurling
Compliance team manager - SeMS
UK Civil Aviation Authority
UK
Panel Moderators:
Neville Hay, director of training, Interportpolice
Philipp Kriegbaum, retired senior aviation security expert, Philipp Kriegbaum

Opening Day Party hosted by Groupe ADP. Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Day 2: Thursday, June 16

Aviation security, border control and facilitation
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Dr Jean Salomon
Principal
JSCP Consulting Partners
France
Philipp Kriegbaum
Retired senior aviation security expert
Philipp Kriegbaum
Germany
Art Kosatka
CEO
TranSecure
USA
Neville Hay
Director of training
Interportpolice
UK

09:05

A closer look at AI-based identity verification tools

Abdullah Elbi
Legal researcher
KU Leuven Centre for IT and IP Law
Belgium
The speaker will discuss the interaction between the future AI Act and the use of AI-based identity verification in the border check environment. The presentation delves into the classification of AI systems based on risk categories as laid down in the AI Act proposal and attempts to shed some light on legal obligations arising from the development and deployment of AI-based identity verification in the border control management. He will focus on the current societal and legal challenges (e.g. reliability of the systems, bias and discrimination and privacy concerns) arising from the application of these tools.

What the audience will learn

  • AI-based identity verification tools are increasingly used in border control management to ensure efficiency and security at borders
  • The deployment of these tools has been accompanied with growing concerns over the legal obligations imposed by the upcoming AI Act
  • How are AI-based identity verification classified under AI Act Proposal?
  • Which legal obligations arise from the development and deployment of AI-based identity verification?
  • Which challenges arise from deploying AI-based-based identity verification in border control?

09:20

Europe’s industry-changing ID management requirements at the service of the transportation industry

Georg Hasse
Head of international sales, homeland security division
secunet Security Networks AG
Germany
This presentation will cover Europe’s industry-changing ID management requirements at the service of the transportation industry

09:35

Facial recognition technologies used in border and boarding management systems: opportunity or challenge?

Stéfane Mouille
Labs director
Cabinet Louis Reynaud - CLR Labs
France
Kevin Carta
Biometric expert
CLR Labs
France
During this joint presentation, delegates will think about: Facial recognition systems, from video protection and access control to open mobile applications, fly to gate, mobile driving license, mobile digital travel credential and the state of play for the facial recognition value chain and main actors. Privacy concerns: Binding facial portrait/video and PNR? Are we going toward the push vs pull approach on facial portrait? How to build privacy by design in facial recognition systems in an airport? AI training for airports use case: Is the training dataset compliant with this specific environment? Is the silicon masks threat considered in your facial recognition system?

09:50

Entry/Exit System implementation: impact on facilitation in the airports

Marie-Eve Albertelli
Senior project manager
Groupe ADP
France
Quentin Devouge
Head of facilitation
Groupe ADP
France
The European Entry/Exit System (EES) to register entry and exit data for third-country nationals crossing the external borders of the Schengen area is expected to go live by October 1, 2022. The new regulation brings a major challenge in border crossing procedures as the capture of biometric data will be required at arrivals and departures for most third country nationals. To mitigate the impact, some border police and airports have taken this opportunity to implement smart borders, others a semi-manual process. For all, processing times, equipment financing and procurement and space allocation remain key issues in Covid times.

What the audience will learn

  • Understand the regulation requirements and the impact for the travel industry
  • Understand the process options and the associated impact on processing times and layouts
  • Share lessons learned on process and technology approaches

10:10 - 10:40

Panel discussion: Evolving goals and challenges of secure border management systems

The unraveling challenge faced by our industry is no loner how to arbitrate between security and facilitation, but how to successfully manage both. This panel will review the major pillars sustaining this objective, including the progress of biometric sensors, the biometric constraints of automated ID risk assessment, and the evolving state-of-the-art of large-scale smart border management.
Abdullah Elbi
Legal researcher
KU Leuven Centre for IT and IP Law
Belgium
Georg Hasse
Head of international sales, homeland security division
secunet Security Networks AG
Germany
Marie-Eve Albertelli
Senior project manager
Groupe ADP
France
Stéfane Mouille
Labs director
Cabinet Louis Reynaud - CLR Labs
France
Panel Moderators:
Philipp Kriegbaum, retired senior aviation security expert, Philipp Kriegbaum
Jean Salomon, principal, JSCP Consulting Partners

10:40 - 11:00

Break

11:00

Sofia International Airport’s vision for future EES-compliant hubs

Dr Henning Pfisterer
Chief operating officer (COO), member of the management board
SOF Connect Sofia Airport
Bulgaria
Additional border control procedures through EES significantly increase the time required for passenger clearance and therefore cause delays. This is not acceptable for airports or passengers. This case study from aviation hubs in Bulgaria shows a possible blueprint to address these challenges. Sofia Airport implemented process automation at key passenger touchpoints. Existing border control technology was comprehensively modernized in the midst of a pandemic, using ABC gates, self-service kiosks, camera systems and fingerprint readers. Although the new systems fulfill different functions, when combined they noticeably accelerate passenger processing and greatly reduce the workload of authorities.

What the audience will learn

  • Automation and process optimization ensure that time limits and increasing passengers numbers under
  • Space limitation at airports require flexible positioning scenarios of the systems for manual, automated and self-service border control
  • Lessons learned from connecting a highly secure and biometric infrastructure to provide a seamless experience to all passenger groups
  • Evaluation of results from the use of high-speed facial acquisition at the manual border control prior to EES operation
  • Lessons learned from a Schengen applicant – integrating special workflows and new technologies remotely in the midst of a pandemic

11:25

DHS Science and Technology Biometric and Identity Technology Center Research

Arun Vemury
Director, Biometric and Identity Technology Center, Science and Technology Directorate
U.S. Department of Homeland Security
USA
The DHS Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) Biometric and Identity Technology Center is S&T’s core biometric and identity RDT&E capability to drive enduring efficiencies and biometric innovations across DHS. The technology center’s research focuses on enhancing collection and matching capabilities; data security, privacy and integrity; next-generation identity documents and transactions; and identity linking and correlation.

What the audience will learn

  • An overview of the DHS S&T Biometric and Identity Technology Center
  • The technology center’s core research thrust areas
  • The path forward and opportunities for collaboration with industry and academia

11:50

Transforming arrivals into the United States using facial comparison

Diane Sabatino
Deputy executive assistant commissioner, office of field operations
US Customs and Border Protection
USA
CBP has transformed international arrivals using facial comparison technology. The new arrivals process, piloted in 2017-2018, was accelerated during Covid-19 and is now at more than 200 airports accounting for >99.5% of arriving passengers. This new process decreases contact between passengers and officers and removes the need for APCs and touchscreens. Using facial comparison technology, CBP quickly and reliably verifies a traveler’s identity biometrically and retrieves traveler records from CBP systems using the traveler’s face. This eliminates time-consuming steps for most travelers, such as document scans and fingerprint captures, and speeds up the inspection process.

What the audience will learn

  • How CBP uses advanced passenger data and holdings to facilitate a fast (<1 second) transaction that biometrically identifies a traveler
  • Lessons learned shifting from a passport-first system to a facial comparison-first system
  • How has Covid-19 created challenges to facial recognition including masks and plastic dividers, and how CBP has overcome these challenges
  • How CBP is looking to further transform the arrivals process now that passengers can be quickly and automatedly identified
  • How CBP incorporated protections for privacy and information security into the system

12:15

Biometrics and digital identity

Austin Gould
Requirements and capabilities analysis (RCA) assistant administrator
Transportation Security Administration (TSA)
USA
Diane Sabatino
Deputy executive assistant commissioner, office of field operations
US Customs and Border Protection
USA
Beyond COVID-19, digital credential technology has long-term potential in everyday society to boost the advancement of biometric and touchless processing. Digital health passports could unlock mass return to offices, concerts, and sport events, and enable a more convenient, contactless travel process from check-in to boarding and open the door to biometrics being used more widely throughout the travel ecosystem across airlines and airports. This presentation will explore the ways in which we can bring all these elements together successfully in order to scale the adoption of new digital identity and biometric approaches across the industry.

What the audience will learn

  • Passengers can help with TSA’s biometric journey by staying patient given the privacy and cybersecurity concerns which must be addressed
  • Biometric technology will demonstrate its worth by effectively providing the optimal passenger experience
  • CBP rolled out global entry totems with facial recognition to about 33 different locations, and the results have been incredible.

12:35 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

Theater of security design – upgrading security at Australian Airports

Krishan Tangri
Executive general manager, infrastructure and planning
Brisbane Airport Corporation
Australia
Robert Ousey
Principal - national sector leader - transport
Architectus
Australia
In recent tests in the US and elsewhere, high percentages of the undercover test passengers carrying prohibited items, including a variety of weapons, made it through security screening points at major airports. To effectively transform the poor performance of security spaces, the implementation of the latest screening technology and high-quality training for security personnel needs to be matched with the deterrent offered by the successful application of the ‘theater of security design’. In Australian Airports we might finally be getting it right with security spaces that say in every way, ‘Just try it. You are definitely going to get caught!’

What the audience will learn

  • How the planning and design of the security screening spaces at Australian Airports successfully leverages the ‘theater of security design'
  • How specific design elements contribute to a holistic security response
  • How high-quality design assists in creating better security staff cohesion and communications, resulting in improved efficiency and passenger experience

14:05

Schiphol's experience of CT scanners

Hedzer Komduur
Deputy director - safety, security and environment
Amsterdam Airport Schiphol
Netherlands
The presentation will comprise a review of Schiphol's implementation of CT scanners at the checkpoint, covering operational benefits, related costs and space and conversion of personnel.

What the audience will learn

  • Insight into why using CT makes sense at Schiphol
  • Insight into how we planned the deployment
  • Insight into the next steps in development

14:25

Upgrading Paris airports to ECAC EDS Standard 3

Emmanuel Lefevre
Terminal and BHS projects director
Groupe ADP
France
All European hold baggage screening should be upgraded to Standard 3-approved explosives detection systems (EDS) by March 2023 at the latest. Thus Groupe ADP is currently redesigning and reconfiguring its CDG and ORY baggage handling systems under the surveillance of the French and European authorities. In the end, more than 100 EDS will be installed for a total investment of €500m. This challenging upgrade has had to be conducted under running operation and in conjunction with other passenger terminal revamping projects. As such, special attention is paid to the work of the SkyTeam Hub, which handles more than 70,000 bags per day.

What the audience will learn

  • Security is priceless
  • Working jointly with authorities is crucial
  • Exogenous constraints cannot be ignored
  • BHS are hard to regulate and sensitive to interventions
  • Anticipation is the key

14:45 - 15:15

Panel discussion: Deter and detect

Investment in, development and deployment of technology sees great advancements in both the facilitating and screening of passengers and baggage. But what about airports who do not have the budget? And will advancement create other vulnerabilities and exploitation in the system?
Hedzer Komduur
Deputy director - safety, security and environment
Amsterdam Airport Schiphol
Netherlands
Emmanuel Lefevre
Terminal and BHS projects director
Groupe ADP
France
Krishan Tangri
Executive general manager, infrastructure and planning
Brisbane Airport Corporation
Australia
Panel Moderators:
Art Kosatka, CEO, TranSecure
Philipp Kriegbaum, retired senior aviation security expert, Philipp Kriegbaum

15:15 - 15:35

Break

15:35

Airports adapting to changes in security operations

Johnnie Müller
SVP, security services
Copenhagen Airports
Denmark
The tactical and operational side of security and managing the future. Adapting to the change in operations, what have airports done? Highlighting the ups and downs, the positive outcomes, what’s changed and lessons learned.

What the audience will learn

  • How the Covid-19 crisis not only created staff layoff and other challenges, it also created new opportunities for changes and development
  • How to seize the opportunity for change and development and make the hard and important decisions to reach for your goal
  • How to be an organisation with vision and a burning desire to build something new, but can't, because unpredictability strikes and priorities change
  • Having the desire for change but not the leadership power to develop and chase the desired change

15:55

Online training (during Covid-19) for aviation and border security personnel

Jonathan (Jon) Holland
Program director
Borderpol - the World Border Organization
UK
From the very early stages of the pandemic, organizations were required to react quickly, in terms of their training and educational programs. Many simply canceled/postponed all training in those initial stages. Others shifted from face-to-face learning to the online virtual platform. As the situation eased, in some parts of the world, we saw a partial return - albeit in hybrid format, with perhaps local students attending face-to-face in the classroom, and others (from further afield) participating online, via video link. Is online/virtual learning the new norm and fit for the future world environment?

What the audience will learn

  • The initial knee-jerk response (cancel/postpone)
  • The 2nd level response (adapt and convert online)
  • The interim/hybrid model (mixed participation)
  • The current situation (agency/location specific)
  • The future/way forward (leading to the Q&A)

16:15

Solving the document check nightmare to enable travel at scale

Irra Ariella Khi
CEO
Zamna
UK
We will be addressing how the permanent shift in testing, vaccination and further document check requirements is changing the world of post-Covid-19 travel. Governments have put pressure on airlines to solve this. We will be answering seven key challenges in facilitating passengers in the Covid-19 world: no new apps for passengers, no self-assertion of health data, no digital uploading, no physical paper checks, no scanning QR codes, no new process at the airport, meeting ever-changing regulations, and the ability to launch at scale NOW.

What the audience will learn

  • The options available to airlines in responding to a Covid-19 paradigm shift, unlocking health data using only existing check-in processes
  • Most passengers will not adopt new apps or processes. How do we unlock this while NOT manually checking passenger documents?
  • How to satisfy health document requirements before passengers arrive, with no new process needed from the passenger or the airline
  • Why apps don’t cut it: complying with ICAO’s NCLB ‘no country left behind’ initiative and ensuring inclusive solutions are delivered
  • How to assure next-level privacy, requiring the verification of not only identity data but now highly emotive health data

16:35

20 Years since 9/11: achievements and remaining pressing challenges

Philip Baum
Visiting professor, aviation security, Coventry University
Green Light Limited
UK
The 20th anniversary of the September 11 attacks allowed the media and the industry to reflect on the many subsequent achievements made to improve security in the skies and on the ground. While we rightly celebrate success, we must also avoid complacency and face up to the remaining challenges. This presentation looks at the broad range of attacks, often unassociated with terrorism, that have taken place, and examines whether our aviation security system is robust enough to prevent similar incidents in the future and proactive enough to counter the threats we know exist but have yet to see realized.

What the audience will learn

  • How to achieve a balance between using technology and embracing behavioral analysis techniques
  • The importance of recognizing that aviation security is far more than counterterrorism
  • How to face up to the limitations of our existing system and adopt a proactive stance to manage future threats
  • Recognizing that poor mental health is a security issue and cannot always be pigeonholed as a safety problem
  • Adapting our security techniques to identify threats in the (post-)pandemic world

16:55 - 17:30

Panel discussion: Security operations – future management

Short presentations from the speakers will lead the panel debate focusing on the impact and outcomes within the aviation industry. The panel will discuss how airports and airlines have had to adapt to new strategies, what it has meant for the tactical and the operational side of the business, the integration of new technology and processes and how these affect its operators.
Irra Ariella Khi
CEO
Zamna
UK
Johnnie Müller
SVP, security services
Copenhagen Airports
Denmark
Jonathan (Jon) Holland
Program director
Borderpol - the World Border Organization
UK
Philip Baum
Visiting professor, aviation security, Coventry University
Green Light Limited
UK
Panel Moderator:
Neville Hay, director of training, Interportpolice

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS ceremony and celebration. Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Commercial development and retail experience

Day 1: Wednesday, June 15

Commercial development and retail experience
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs