Conference Program

400+ EXPERT AIRPORT & AIRLINE INDUSTRY SPEAKERS! Probably our BEST conference program EVER!

The conference addresses airport and airline business-critical issues and solutions, providing innovative ideas and progressive thinking for future development, and proven measures for maintaining passenger custom and satisfaction – all key to the industry’s future success.

Conference Program SEARCH FUNCTION now available! Search for words or phrases to find all the presentations and panel discussions that you will be interested in.


Welcome & Opening Address

Day 1: Tuesday, June 9

Welcome & Opening Address
08:40 - 08:55

08:40

WELCOME TO PASSENGER TERMINAL CONFERENCE & EXPO 2020!

Tony Robinson
Chairman and CEO, UKi Media & Events / founder
Passenger Terminal EXPO & Passenger Terminal World
UK

08:45

WELCOME TO PARIS AND OPENING ADDRESS

Augustin de Romanet
CEO
Groupe ADP
France

All conference streams will begin promptly at 09:00hrs. Please make your way to your conference rooms.

Airport Cities, Transport Connections & Regions

Day 1: Tuesday, June 9

Airport Cities, Transport Connections & Regions
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chair

Léa Bodossian
Managing partner
Airspire
Belgium

09:05

Airport City Manchester: a comparison with airport cities around the globe

Dr Viktoriia Myroniuk
Program leader in BEng/MEng Aeronautical Engineering
Salford University Manchester
UK
The presentation will discuss and analyze the main characteristics, pros and cons of airport cities around the globe. Characteristics of Airport City Manchester will be outlined and analyzed. Greater Manchester Ground Strategy 2040 and its importance for Airport City Manchester will be described.

What the audience will learn

  • The main characteristics, pros and cons of airport cities around the globe
  • Characteristics of Airport City Manchester
  • Airport City Manchester and Greater Manchester Ground Strategy 2040

09:35

Keys to developing a successful airport city

Geoff Herdman
Director, real estate and investment attraction
Edmonton Airports
Canada
We will consider the primary failures in developing an airport city and explore tactics to avoid these mistakes through proactive planning and change management of internal processes and culture at airports. An examination of airport organizational culture in the context of real estate development will provide suggestions for how to create a supportive climate for the sales and property development team at your airport, designed to enable successful development of an airport city.

What the audience will learn

  • Tactics to drive and sustain the development of an airport city
  • How to create a culture and climate that support the development of an airport city
  • Keys to change management in an airport context
  • Smart planning for airport city development

10:05

Beijing new aerotropolis – new power engine for Beijing

Carol Zhang
Project manager
Beijing New Aerotropolis Holdings Co Ltd [via live uplink]
China
The presentation will introduce Beijing Daxing International Airport and the surrounding economic zone, and the philosophies behind the urban design of the BDIA Economic Zone (Beijing part), which was awarded platinum level of LEED for Cities. It will also discuss the investment opportunities at the current stage and some preferential policies such as the Free Trade Area since BDIAEZ is the only FTA in Beijing.

What the audience will learn

  • Introduction to Beijing Daxing International Airport and BDIA Economic Zone
  • Philosophies behind BDIAEZ urban planning (Beijing part)
  • Investment opportunities (four projects)
  • Preferential policies

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

King Shaka International Airport and the Durban Aerotropolis development

Terence Delomoney
General manager - King Shaka International Airport
Airports Company South Africa
South Africa
The presentation will discuss the development of an effective aerotropolis with innovative and collaborative partnerships between the airport and key business stakeholders of Durban and the region.

What the audience will learn

  • Collaborative partnerships
  • Economic benefits
  • Challenges and solutions

11:25

HKIA is moving toward an airport city

Steven Yiu
Deputy director, service delivery
Airport Authority Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Today’s airports are not only facilities for managing passengers and cargo, but also incubators that help wider networks of interrelated activities and businesses thrive. Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) has embarked on a transformation from a city airport into an airport city, which will integrate the airport with many of its surrounding entities, turning it into something much bigger than just an airport.

What the audience will learn

  • How HKIA has prepared itself for growth and is striving for breakthroughs
  • Introduction to HKIA’s current and future developments
  • How HKIA has expanded its market catchment to the Greater Bay Area

11:55 - 13:15

Lunch

13:15

Solidarity Hub – a new-generation airport

Marek Litwin
Director planning and strategy
Solidarity Transport Hub Poland
Poland
Malgorzata Poplawska
Airport planning manager
Solidarity Transport Hub Poland
Poland
Solidarity Transport Hub is a greenfield airport project in the heart of Europe. With an initial capacity of 45 million ppa, two runways, an airport city and full intermodal connectivity, it has an ambition to be a game-changer when it comes to travel experience. So, what is the basis of the claims that it will "rank among the world's top 10 airports", offer "the lowest possible costs of construction and operation" and "redesign the airport experience"? The speakers, in a verbal duel, will present the concept of a new airport and provide insight into the processes that shape it.

What the audience will learn

  • Overview of the concept of the new airport and the context of the decision to launch this project
  • The main strategic assumptions about the new airport – infrastructure and processes
  • How we plan to translate our ambitions and strategy into processes and workflows and why they will succeed
  • The risks and challenges of a greenfield project of this size and ambition, and how to manage them
  • What it means to be one of the top 10 airports and what a next-generation airport is

13:45

LEED for Cities and Communities certification for airports and aerotropolises

Jeff Denno
Senior project manager, sustainability
Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport
USA
Dr Daniele Guglielmino
Senior sustainability specialist - cities and communities
GBCI Europe
Italy
Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, the world’s busiest and most efficient airport, is the first airport in the world to be awarded LEED for Cities and Communities certification. Concurrently, Beijing Daxing International Airport Area became the first aerotropolis in the world to be awarded the same certification. This discussion will explore how this platform has supported the planning efforts and operational decision making at each of these communities; and where the intersection of these data sets can drive positive, people-focused, economic growth to prepare for the rapidly changing landscape of the aviation industry.

What the audience will learn

  • An understanding of the framework of LEED for Cities and Communities within the context of an airport and aerotropolis
  • The tools needed to create a roadmap to LEED for Cities and Communities certification within a multifaceted entity
  • How to use the platform as a mechanism to develop, support, and capture the successes of sustainability programming and policies

14:15

Smart Airport City 2.0: an amazing, lively hub

Hubert Fontanel
Real estate deputy director
Groupe ADP
France
Groupe ADP designs airport cities that generate value for airports and airport areas, in order to offer end users a unique experience, directly linked to the world. Inside new-generation airport cities, employees – just like partners, clients, suppliers and passengers – will be able to meet, exchange, relax, enjoy retail and diversified services meant to offer an unforgettable experience, source of well-being and serenity.

What the audience will learn

  • Airport cities as added-value generators
  • Create a unique experience for airport city end users
  • Imagine a new range of quality services enabling real exchanges, well-being and serenity for airport city end users

14:45

Developing a smart airport within a smart city

Neil Pakey
Chief executive officer
Nieuport Aviation, owner and operator of Toronto City Airport Passenger Terminal
Canada
Historically, city-center airports have been politically challenging. More recently, city-center airports have been valued as they connect people, businesses and cities in a fast and efficient manner. They are also highly contributing economic engines for cities and local economies. Traditionally, airports were not designed and operated to fit in an urban context. Emerging technologies have the opportunity to change the way future airports are developed and operated, and reduce their impact on the environment. Leveraging technological advancements in the aviation sector will go a long way to developing smart city-center gateways that can coexist with smart cities in a friendly manner.

What the audience will learn

  • Opportunities and challenges of a city-center airport
  • How do city airports coexist within the community and urban context?
  • How can we influence the political views of a city airport?
  • City-center airport as a key link to the city transportation system
  • The upgrade that provides city-center passengers with a unique experience

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30

London’s airport growth: securing the transport connectivity and capacity

Shamal Ratnayaka
Aviation strategy lead
Transport for London
UK
Every London airport is seeking to grow. This presentation will set out what needs to be done to ensure that the needs of airport passengers, staff and freight can be accommodated, mindful of environmental obligations and without being at the expense of non-airport trips. It will look at the steps London is taking to change travel behavior and what that means for the airports serving the city and the part they can play.

What the audience will learn

  • How to meet the transport needs of the airport alongside the needs of the city
  • Initiatives with the potential to shift trips to sustainable modes
  • How airports can align with the wider city policy and planning context

16:00

Integrated transport thinking is key to sustainable airport growth

Alex Kirkwood
Partner
Weston Williamson + Partners
UK
Passenger numbers at East Midlands Airport (EMA) are forecast to increase from 5 to 10 MAP over the next 20 years, but current reliance on road connectivity places a severe constraint on expansion plans. Our vision proposal for a rail link service to the airport will enable EMA to grow while addressing key environmental challenges. It connects the airport to the cities of Derby, Nottingham, Leicester and HS2 East Midlands Hub and utilizes existing spare capacity in Network Rail infrastructure. We explore the wider economic drivers and opportunities for regional growth facilitated through investment in transport infrastructure and transport-oriented development.

What the audience will learn

  • The strategic importance of East Midlands Airport as a catalyst for regional development
  • The importance of an efficient and environmentally sustainable surface access strategy including rail connectivity
  • Details of the proposed rail line connecting EMA to Derby, Nottingham, Leicester, East Midlands Parkway and suburban stations
  • How improved east-west regional connectivity will optimize the benefits of HS2 in the Midlands
  • Plans for a new station and ground transportation center at EMA

16:30 - 17:30

Panel Discussion: Urban Turbine Research Project

Airports have become a vital part of contemporary society. They have turned from infrastructure knots to multipurpose urban centers. Yet they are physically separated from city centers, often unnecessarily disconnected. The Urban Turbine Research Project is connecting airport owners and operators with academics and leading industry experts in an unprecedented attempt to overcome traditional boundaries. The pool-funded research engages intrinsically connected stakeholders, fostering the future model of innovative connectivity and addressing opportunities using technology to shrink the infrastructure footprint, reduce the environmental impact and improve the quality of life for passengers and citizens alike.

What the audience will learn

  • Airport visioning, broken down into manageable stages, zooming out and in to the detail of future airport planning
  • Best practice of collaboration between industry and academia, providing future airport management capabilities and personnel
  • Airport urban planning, turning airports into people-centric, attractive and best-connected urban places, focused on sustainability and well-being
  • Passenger processing revisited from home to gate, starting the process afresh, overcoming airline-driven terminal design practice
  • Airport governance, integrated airport, city and airport access management, Airport Collaborative Decision Making
Rudolf Lipold
Executive director
Salzburger Flughafen GmbH
Austria
Ashwini Thorat
Head Airport Planning
GVK
India
Paul Beck
Managing director
Planeground Airport Consulting
Germany
Max Schintlmeister
Managing director
Airport Excellence SL
Spain
Panel Moderator:
Henrik Rothe, senior lecturer, head of Urban Turbine Research Project, Cranfield University

Opening Day Party – hosted by Groupe ADP – Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Airport Design, Planning & Development

Day 1: Tuesday, June 9

Airport Design, Planning & Development
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Paolo Bianchi
Head of infrastructure strategy and planning
Bologna Airport
Italy
Mark Wolfe
Principal
Hassell
Australia

09:05

Smart airport for sustainable aviation

Augustin de Romanet
CEO
Groupe ADP
France
Edward Arkwright
Deputy CEO
Groupe ADP
France
Climate change mitigation, air quality improvement and biodiversity preservation are challenges at the forefront of civil society expectations. Given this context, expectations are high for aircraft manufacturers, airlines and airports, among others. Action appears to be a prerequisite to maintain the license-to-grow and even license-to-operate of the sector. In this context, airports can play a significant role toward more sustainable aviation, given their ability to provide solutions that will not only reduce their own impact – by decarbonizing their energy production, for instance – but also help all third parties to limit their impact (airlines, ground handlers, passengers and employees). To accelerate that journey toward sustainability, smart technologies are expected to play a significant role, for instance by facilitating intermodality, leveraging data to turn buildings and energy networks smart, or, in the long run, paving the way to a smart airport city.

What the audience will learn

  • Contribution of airports to climate change mitigation
  • Added value of smart airports to further increase the optimization of infrastructure and airport managers' sustainability
  • Smart technologies – enablers of an airport's sustainability

09:35

The future of O’Hare International Airport

Robert Hoxie
Chief development officer
City of Chicago Department of Aviation
USA
Dominic Grasacia
Project manager O'Hare Global Terminal
City of Chicago, Department of Aviation
USA
Having nearly completed a $10bn airfield realignment program including four new runways and two reconstructed and lengthened runways in the midst of the world’s busiest airfield, Chicago O’Hare is now focused on the $8.5bn Terminal Area Development Program (TAP). The TAP program will replace Terminal 2 and integrate existing Terminals 1 and 3 into a facility housing two major airline alliances. This presentation will focus the overall strategic direction for the airport, the current terminal works in progress, and the future terminal development plans.

What the audience will learn

  • The previous runway realignment and implementation and how the stage was set for the Terminal Area Development Program
  • The strategic direction for terminal development at O’Hare
  • The progress of terminal works to date
  • Overview of Phase 1 - Near-Term Terminal Development Program O’Hare Global Terminal and Satellites 1 & 2
  • Description of the Phase 2 Terminal Development Program

10:05

Transforming LAX

Bernardo Gogna
Chief development officer
Los Angeles World Airports
USA
LAX is in the midst of a US$14.3bn Capital Improvement Program, which includes the US$5.5bn Landside Access Modernization Program (LAMP). LAX is utilizing its footprint to modernize the airport, enhance guest experience and improve access. The LAMP will create new front doors to LAX, strengthen ties to the local communities and provide a streamlined connection to public transport. LAX is the fourth busiest airport in the world and the second busiest in the USA, so a program of this size poses unique challenges and is a hotbed of innovation in engineering, construction and delivery mechanisms.

What the audience will learn

  • The journey of LAX to becoming a world-class airport and first-class neighbor
  • The holistic approach of LAX to improving guest experience on all levels
  • The innovation needed to manage the unique challenges of overlapping multi-billion-dollar programs

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

London Gatwick's ongoing transformation

Cédric Laurier
Chief technical officer
Gatwick Airport
UK
Gatwick's ambitious capital investment plan and transformation continue apace. The airport is committed to exploring how to grow sustainably, while supporting the local and national economy, improving facilities and continuing to transform services for its passengers. The presentation will discuss the ongoing transformation of the airport and what the future holds for London's second-largest airport.

What the audience will learn

  • Gatwick's plans for the future
  • Understand Gatwick's innovative transformation process
  • Hear how the airport is making best use of its facilities

11:25

Auckland Airport Terminal Development Program – taking an agile approach

André Lovatt
General manager airport development and delivery
Auckland International Airport Limited
New Zealand
Graham Bolton
Global aviation practice leader
Mott MacDonald
UK
The Terminal Development Program forms a central part of a NZ$4bn+ capital program at Auckland International Airport. It includes a new international arrivals facility, landside redevelopment and a new domestic jet facility – supporting a near doubling of capacity and continued improvement in customer experience. This presentation will give an overview of the terminal development program, the different approaches being adopted to deliver the individual facilities, and the way that an agile-like approach has been used in prioritizing the capital solution and development of options.

What the audience will learn

  • Context of the current and future capital development program at Auckland International Airport
  • Application of an agile-like approach to airport planning and large-scale development and delivery
  • Alignment of capital delivery models with program and project requirements
  • Importance of airline customer, government agency and stakeholder collaboration in the airport development process

11:55 - 13:15

Lunch

13:15

Building a new terminal while in flight

Heather Leide
Director, airport development
Metropolitan Airports Commission
USA
Kerry Bruggemann
Principal shareholder
Michaud Cooley Erickson
USA
Minneapolis-St Paul International Airport (MSP) is designing a new terminal without relocating. With only a 15ft expansion and a new parking ramp, they are undergoing a US$1bn program renovation and expansion, reinventing the entire facility. During construction, MSP has hosted some of the largest events: the SuperBowl, Final Four and PGA Tournaments, utilizing both the design team and a large volunteer staff to make this project proceed efficiently. The MSP director of airport development and the Michaud Cooley Erickson MEP principal will present the unique collaboration that made this all happen, and will enlighten the audience with best practices learned.

What the audience will learn

  • MSP utilized staff, volunteers and consultants to integrate with passengers, creating the most welcoming and friendly experience during construction
  • MSP integrated many unique technologies including blast mitigation, hearing loops, HVAC upgrades and plumbing water savings to execute this project
  • During this program, MSP increased passenger flow and optimized vertical circulation to make the passenger experience seamless
  • The program created a synergy of services (restrooms, concessions, etc) consolidating and combining the baggage claim and ticket lobby
  • Increasing passenger numbers meant increases in parking – MSP built a state-of-the-art parking ramp to help improve the passenger experience

13:45

Closing Linate during the summer: positive outcomes of a relevant disruption

Armando Brunini
CEO
SEA Milan Airports
Italy
During most of 2019, SEA – Milan Airport’s management company – and its newly appointed top management had a single priority: accomplish extraordinary refurbishments at its city airport (Linate), implying the closure of the airport for three months, while minimizing the negative impact on airlines and passengers. The two main challenges were to finish works at Linate on time and in line with budget while hosting most of its traffic in Malpensa, the bigger airport in the system, during the peak summer period without negative consequences for the level of service. SEA adopted a holistic approach to this disruptive project, leveraging the engagement of its people, strong collaboration with key stakeholders, and clear communication with clients and passengers. A dashboard of project KPIs was put in place to monitor the project's progress and measure its outcome.

What the audience will learn

  • Main challenges and key success factors in managing an extraordinary infrastructural and operational event
  • How a highly disruptive event may be transformed into positive outcomes
  • Lessons learned by top management that may have a long-term impact on the airport company

14:15

Simultaneous development of 14 airports in Greece – challenges and successes

Ilias Maragakis
Chief operating officer
Fraport Greece
Greece
Rolf Klitscher
Project director Cluster B
Fraport Greece
Greece
In 2016 Fraport Greece was awarded the concession contract to develop and operate 14 airports in Greece. In addition to the challenge of setting up the entire company from scratch, the concession contract requires the design, application for construction permits, contract negotiations and the construction to be finalized for all 14 airports in parallel within 20 months for refurbishments and within 48 months for expansion and new construction. The challenges related to the parallel development of the landside, terminal and airside facilities will be shown within this presentation. The presentation will end with a short animation of the new façade in Mykonos.

What the audience will learn

  • Short overview of Fraport Greece and the concession agreement
  • Challenge of the simultaneous development of 14 airports – how the structure was set up
  • Challenges related to engineering capacity, logistics of material and staff
  • Success achieved with schedule, design and stakeholder satisfaction
  • The animation of the new façade in Mykonos will present the landmark within the airports of Greece

14:45

Orly Runway 3 reconstruction; an operational and technical challenge

Thierry Campin
General manager infrastructures
Groupe ADP
France
Michel Landelle
Senior manager airside operations, services and safety
Groupe ADP
France
Running operations on an airport with a single runway when you are used to having a total of three is definitely always a challenge! Orly Airport has experienced huge upgrading works on its runways throughout summer and autumn 2019. These included the demolition and reconstruction of the full pavement structure of the main runway and part of the cross runway, and structural reinforcement of a runway bridge over highway. The upgrade decision was made after several studies and discussions with all partners (airlines, civil aviation, local residents) to achieve a unique and outstanding operation. This presentation will cover the reconstruction project's process steps and strategy.

What the audience will learn

  • All the steps of the process and the challenging operational and environmental context
  • The strategy that led to the completion of this project within a critical timeframe of 18 weeks
  • How an innovative recycling pavement technique has limited the environmental impact

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30

Keeping the heart and soul of 'America’s Best Airport'

Vince Granato
Chief operating officer
Port of Portland
USA
Sharron van der Meulen
Partner
ZGF Architects
USA
How do you improve an airport so beloved that passengers write poems and songs about it? Hailed as 'America's Best Airport' seven years running, Portland International Airport is increasing capacity by 65% to accommodate 33 million passengers over the next two decades. A series of transformative projects will double the main terminal’s footprint and promise more fun, more food and more flow. Amid this growth, learn how PDX is planning to maintain its uniquely curated local character cherished by passengers and employees alike.

What the audience will learn

  • Understand what it means to design for a distinct regional identity via passenger journey mapping
  • Use of daylight, biophilia and sightlines as well as local amenities to create moments of comfort to reduce traveler stress
  • How to create an equitable passenger journey for all travelers
  • Integration of local, sustainable materials to create a sense of place while also reducing carbon footprint
  • Design, engineering and construction considerations to ensure PDX remains fully operational and passenger disruption is minimized

16:00

Sustainability@SYD

Chris Evans
Chief assets and infrastructure officer
Sydney Airport
Australia
Sustainability underpins Sydney Airport’s commitment to responsible growth in a changing world. As the global demand for travel grows, so does the focus on sustainable aviation and, increasingly, the role airports play in this transition. As critical infrastructure for our city, state and country, Sydney Airport recognizes sustainability as being key to our future. This presentation explores Sydney Airport’s approach to delivering stronger business and sustainability outcomes through planning and delivery of our built asset, to working with our airport partners in support of their sustainability goals, and to meeting and exceeding growing community expectations.

What the audience will learn

  • Creating commercial and sustainability 'win/wins'
  • How a focus on customer and community amenity drives business outcomes
  • Delivering environmental dividends through innovation

16:30

Small airport, big experience – airport transformation

Shane Munroe
Chief technical officer
MBJ Airports Limited
Jamaica
Small and large airports differ in passenger traffic but face similar challenges. Although airport size differs, passenger experience remains the same. This presentation discusses strategies to provide passengers with a 'big experience' even at smaller airports. Discussion points include the role of privatization in the transformation process; transformation strategies for airside, terminal and landside infrastructure; creating value for all stakeholders and the community; strategies to improve the passenger experience. Sangster International Airport, which was privatized in 2003, will be used as a case study.

What the audience will learn

  • The role of privatization in the transformation process
  • Transformation strategies for airside, terminal and landside infrastructure
  • The role of masterplanning and project planning in the transformation process
  • Creating value for all stakeholders and the community
  • Strategies to improve the passenger experience

17:00

Human spaces, people places – transforming Adelaide Airport

Kym Meys
Executive general manager planning and infrastructure
Adelaide Airport
Australia
Adriano Denni
Senior associate architect
Hassell
Australia
Adelaide Airport is consistently regarded as an exceptional benchmark for design, operation, and for the experience it creates for passengers and staff. People love visiting and moving through Adelaide Airport, but what are the ‘real’ reasons for this, and what might an evaluation of this airport teach us? This presentation delves into some key topics that explore why Adelaide Airport is a place people love, how this might influence business growth, and how the current transformation will build upon this.

What the audience will learn

  • Find out why people love using Adelaide Airport, and why this is important
  • Learn why Adelaide Airport is consistently put forward as a benchmark for terminal design and expansion development
  • Learn why Adelaide Airport continues to appeal to its many customers
  • Find out how the terminal expansion will transform this benchmark terminal and create better places for people
  • Hear about the challenges Adelaide Airport has faced during the development of the terminal expansion project, and the lessons learned

Opening Day Party – hosted by Groupe ADP – Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Aviation Security, Border Control & Facilitation

Day 1: Tuesday, June 9

Aviation Security, Border Control & Facilitation
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Philipp Kriegbaum
Retired senior aviation security expert
Philipp Kriegbaum
Germany
Art Kosatka
CEO
TranSecure
USA

09:05

What should we be worrying about in aviation security?

Jim Marriott
President
Marriott Consulting
Canada
Aviation security occupies an uncomfortable position at the nexus of private life, civil society, commerce, government, terrorism, the past and the future. Although remarkable progress has been made in the 50 years of contemporary aviation security history, there is and will be much more to do in the always dynamic risk environment. This presentation will provide an informative exploration of important – and sometimes overlooked – lessons learned and pitfalls to be avoided, a vision for what the future of aviation security is likely to hold, and key challenges that decision makers will have to solve.

What the audience will learn

  • The current and evolving aviation security risk context
  • Important lessons learned for the future of aviation security
  • Suggestions for getting ready for the future

09:35

Insider threat – our common responsibility

Tarald Johansen
Director safety, security, contingency and quality
Avinor
Norway
Due to global, European and Norwegian threat assessments, Avinor has done some work on insider threat. Based on the threat picture, we made an airport-specific assessment identifying the risk of insider threat at our airports. We have arranged workshops together with the police, the police secret service, national security agency and representatives from all 43 airports. Together, we have identified vulnerabilities and addressed measures to mitigate the risk.

What the audience will learn

  • What is insider threat?
  • Who is the insider?
  • Where could it happen?
  • How to mitigate the risk from insider threat?
  • How to secure passengers and employees from insider threat

10:05

Future challenges in aviation security

José Luis Nieto
Head of security
Aena
Spain
The presentation will reflect on the main challenges in the next few years related to security and the actions needed to improve airport security while maintaining the quality given to passengers. The presentation aims to answer these questions: How is it possible to improve the service and the procedures? What are the drivers?

What the audience will learn

  • Security requirements
  • Security management
  • Innovation in security: procedures and equipment
  • Security as a quality service

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

Counter-terrorism – protecting the busiest transportation facilities in the USA

Steven Rotolo
Chief of counter-terrorism
The Port Authority of NY & NJ Police Department
USA
Edward Cetnar
Superintendent of police/director of public safety
The Port Authority of NY & NJ Police Department
USA
The Port Authority Police Department is tasked with protecting some of the busiest transportation facilities in the world. The Port Authority is the only agency to have suffered four terrorist attacks in the USA: the 1975 TWA bombing at LaGuardia Airport, 1993 WTC Bombing, 9/11 WTC attack and the 2017 Bus Terminal suicide bombing attack. The Department has evolved into one of the world's best counter-terrorism police departments through training and first-of-its-kind technology.

What the audience will learn

  • How the Port Authority Police protect the hundreds of millions of people that traverse Port Authority Facilities annually.
  • Protecting the busiest international airport in the USA – JFK
  • Protecting three of the top five terrorist-targeted airports in the USA: JFK, LaGuardia and Newark Liberty International Airport

11:25

Protecting airports from drones

Jean-Philippe Percheron
Hologarde chief commercial officer
Groupe ADP
France
December 2018, Gatwick; May 2019, Frankfurt; September 2019, Aramco. Common point? You guessed it: drone impact on airport or sensitive infrastructure operations. The use of small drones has proliferated over recent years. This has led to a need for organizations to monitor and. where necessary, intervene in the entrance of drones in these airspaces. Since 2017, Groupe ADP has explored, tried solutions and decided to integrate along the way state-of-the-art sensors in an evolving artificial intelligence software, taking into account from the beginning the integration in its APOC. Come and hear the story of the journey that led to it.

What the audience will learn

  • Airport worldwide drones incident review
  • Graduate the risk from air navigation safety to global airport security
  • Counter-drone (C-UAS) solution: agnostic multi-sensor architecture in Paris
  • Discriminate and manage friendly drones from suspicious drones in the airport airspace

11:55 - 12:40

Panel Discussion: Drones and airports: counter-UAS

This panel will take a close look at the safety and security risks that UAS pose to airports, and will present attendees with a menu of mitigation options. Top aviation security and operations experts will examine current counter-UAS technology and legal hurdles through the lens of several recent case studies to provide a viable path forward for airport operators.

What the audience will learn

  • Update on recent incidents and emerging threats posed by UAS technology
  • Understand the key elements of a comprehensive UAS security and engagement plan
  • Brief overview of the state of the art of current counter-UAS technology
  • Analysis of the legal and regulatory hurdles and considerations when implementing a UAS security program
  • Summary of recent airport-based counter-UAS case studies
Holger Kraft
Vice president corporate security
Flughafen München GmbH
Germany
Patricia Hiatt
Deputy director of airport safety and standards
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
USA
Austin Gould
Assistant administrator of requirements and capabilities analysis
Transportation Security Administration
USA
Panel Moderator:
Justin Towles, senior policy advisor, Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP

12:40 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

Cybersecurity – regulation is coming

Eric Vautier
CISO
Groupe ADP
France
Although it is first on the agenda of all airport directors, cybersecurity is still an unfamiliar topic. Who's in charge? What to do? In which order? At what cost? And who's paying? This talk will present how the air transport industry is tackling these issues: the regulators (European and national), the aircraft manufacturers, the operators (including the airports) and the supply chain. It will include some real-life examples to help you integrate cybersecurity into the business processes of an airport and become 'cybersecure by design'.

What the audience will learn

  • Cybersecurity
  • Regulation
  • Physical security

14:15

Behind the scenes – cyber-threat intelligence

Roee Laufer
Division head, cybersecurity
Israel Airports Authority
Israel
The civil aviation sector is an interconnected, global industry with many stakeholders. Cyber intelligence is a crucial building block in today's attempts to defend against cyber-related threats. The presentation will explore how intel is produced, screened and used in a mature cyber program.

What the audience will learn

  • Cyber threats in the aviation industry
  • What is cyber intelligence
  • The importance of intel analysis
  • How to use cyber intel
  • Case studies

14:45

Practical cybersecurity: the close sibling of digital transformation

Aura Moore
Chief information officer
Los Angeles World Airports
USA
David Kipp
VP technology services
Burns Engineering
USA
Like all airports, LAX is embarked on a wide-ranging digital and physical transformation, rebuilding and reinvigorating itself while continuing to serve nearly 90 million passengers every year. Data privacy and information security are at the heart of every project and on the mind of every airport executive. Los Angeles World Airports is at the forefront of cyber defense and is implementing a comprehensive program to deter and respond to cyber threats. This presentation will focus on identification of the myriad digital threats and how to combat/recover from attacks.

What the audience will learn

  • Understanding the fundamental threats and outcomes of cyberattacks
  • Removing jargon and language barriers to airport awareness
  • Key elements of cybermodernization
  • LAWA initiatives

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30

The importance of realistic security planning

Andy Peloquin
Director of security
Redrock Entertainment Services
USA
Your plans look good on paper, but are they functional? With today's threats increasing and changing, are we implementing proper security measures? This presentation will discuss what happened in Las Vegas during the mass active shooter situation, and at Mogadishu Airport in Somalia during the airplane bomb situation.

What the audience will learn

  • Planning versus reality – what really happens when things go wrong. Las Vegas mass shooting.
  • Concentric rings of security (to include behavioral analysis)
  • Increasing threats we face around world
  • The importance of communicating a plan

16:30

The benefits and limitations of behavioural detection

Andrew Palmer
Border security manager
Gatwick Airport
UK
The presentation discusses how the implementation of a behavioural detection program alongside enhanced security awareness can achieve a high level of security assurance. Recognizing the varying degrees of understanding and capabilities surrounding the process, this session will include an insight into the different approaches available, acknowledging both the benefits and limitations of such a program.

What the audience will learn

  • An explanation of the process itself and how it sits within an organization’s security culture
  • An understanding of what benefits can be gained from behavioral detection whilst recognizing the limitations
  • A myth-busting overview of a subject many consider to be an essential component of any security strategy

17:00

Human factors and security measurements – tools and methods

Signe Maria Ghelfi
Researcher
Zurich State Police
Switzerland
Quality control (QC) at security checkpoints (SC) is vital to ensure that the checkpoint and the security officers are ready for the threat. Covert tests are frequently used for QC. However, performance (i.e. detection, alarm resolution, team coordination) can vary substantially. This talk takes a deeper look at what causes differences in performance, and provides insights on cognitive (e.g. TIP, training) and behavioral aspects (e.g. handling uncertainty) that can potentially interfere with or increase security at the SC. The talk closes with best practices and recommendations on QC.

What the audience will learn

  • How can we make covert tests beneficial for security officers as well as for the airport authority?
  • Should training of security officers only focus on cognition (e.g. detection of threats) or also include behavioral aspects?
  • How does performance in covert tests correlate with computer training and TIP performance?
  • Security officers should be trained to handle uncertainty and unpredictability
  • Measuring the security level is not trivial: psychological insights and recommendations for security providers and airport authorities

Opening Day Party – hosted by Groupe ADP – Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Commercial Development, Retail, Concessions & Media

Day 1: Tuesday, June 9

Commercial Development, Retail, Concessions & Media
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Jeremy Corfield
Partner
CPI
Australia
Fundi Sithebe
COO
Airports Company South Africa
South Africa

09:05

Sense of place: a unique global experience to create value

Aude Ferrand
Chief retail officer
Groupe ADP
France
As the traditional duty-free-based business model has been increasingly challenged over the years, it has become critical to better understand the lifestyle experience people expect when traveling. How to propose a unique global experience which gives opportunities for a unique journey? How to create value for all the stakeholders from the airport to the passengers? This presentation will look at several use cases across Paris-Charles de Gaulle and Paris-Orly airports where transformation has been or will be operated.

What the audience will learn

  • How to define a unique sense of place
  • The different challenges in managing such a shift
  • A 360° value creation

09:35

Airport retail is dying, duty free is dead?

Susan Gray
Managing director
Concession Planning International
Australia
Airports that fail to adapt their commercial strategy to take full advantage of the changing nature of the traveling consumer are not optimizing their commercial opportunity. Non-aeronautical activities will continue to represent a huge revenue opportunity for airports for the foreseeable future. However, to truly optimize the opportunity, airports must focus on delivering a great customer experience to all customer groups. To do this, they need to remain relevant. Airports that fail to adapt their commercial strategy and programs to the changing nature of the traveling consumers and their needs will see customer satisfaction and commercial revenues decline.

What the audience will learn

  • The future of the airport commercial business
  • Trends in airport retail
  • The changing face of duty free
  • Other factors influencing airport commercial program development and performance

10:05

Accommodating growth – commercial development in a large hub airport

Penny May
Deputy chief of staff
Denver International Airport
USA
Denver International Airport is the 20th-busiest airport in the world and the fifth-busiest in the United States. Year after year, DEN continues to break passenger records. As an airport originally built for 50 million passengers, DEN is quickly approaching 81.4 million passengers forecasted in just five short years. As a result, DEN has designed a plan to accommodate the rapid growth. Understand what happens when a top-20 airport evolves by going to market with an ambitious commercial strategy combined with a genuine investment in the passenger experience.

What the audience will learn

  • Commercial planning ideas
  • Examples of exciting and creative passenger amenities
  • Market engagement, helping the industry understand the opportunities
  • Examples of commercial development – photos
  • How we are meeting the needs of the passengers

10:35 - 11:00

Panel Discussion: Staying relevant to the traveler of the future

Is airport retail a dying beast? Can the physical world survive in the digital age? Is dwell time worth anything any more? Where do people fit? How do airports optimize the value of their unique characteristics and dynamics to deliver a customer experience that translates into sales?

What the audience will learn

  • Creating a commercial ecosystem – the people, the place, the experience, the technology
  • The importance of evolving the airport proposition to best resonate with your traveling public
  • Balancing the offer to deliver engagement before, during and after the journey
Aude Ferrand
Chief retail officer
Groupe ADP
France
Penny May
Deputy chief of staff
Denver International Airport
USA
Susan Gray
Managing director
Concession Planning International
Australia
Panel Moderators:
Jeremy Corfield, partner, CPI
Fundi Sithebe, COO, Airports Company South Africa

11:00 - 11:20

Break

11:20

Our journey toward increased non-aeronautical revenue

Jabulani Khambule
Acting Group Executive: Commercial
Airports Company South Africa
South Africa
Our organization is large state-owned African airport management operator, with three international and six domestic airports in Africa and stakes in Asia and South America. The organization was faced with a decrease in total revenue, which introduced pressure to strengthen non-aeronautical revenue (NAR). In response to this challenge, the entity embarked on a transformation journey to define and implement a refined operating model that would underpin and enhance NAR ambitions for a six-year horizon while executing revenue-generating initiatives in parallel. This presentation outlines the journey and key lessons learned in the context of a unique African environment.

What the audience will learn

  • An understanding of the African airports management environment
  • An overview of the strategic and operational elements of the transformation for a commercial (non-aeronautical revenue) function
  • An overview of the levers used to drive non-aeronautical revenue growth covering retail, car parking, car hire, property and advertising

11:50

Commercial development and a new digital approach at Istanbul Airport

Ersin İnankul
Chief digital and commercial officer
IGA - Istanbul Airport
Turkey
Istanbul Airport is one of the biggest airports in the world. It opened in April 2019 and boasts the latest technology and design approach. This brand-new airport has a seamless digital commercial approach with a strong technology infrastructure. The IGA commercial platform aims to take a holistic approach to any kind of activity and collaborate with all parties. The presentation will discuss Istanbul Airport’s retail offering and how its concept developed into what it has become today – the airport’s €7.5bn phase 1 investment.

What the audience will learn

  • More detail about Istanbul's new airport commercial activities
  • Details about the new digital approach for commercial development at the airport
  • Istanbul Airport's commercial platform

12:20

YVR's commercial program: sustainable development in action

Scott Norris
Vice president commercial development
Vancouver Airport Authority
Canada
This presentation will showcase YVR's innovative approach to its commercial program integrating the four key pillars of sustainability: economic – driving strong revenues and growing the core business; social – delivering a compelling sense of place, excellence in customer experience and highly engaged employees; environmental – working with business partners to reduce waste, water use, energy consumption and GHG emissions; governance – founded on our unique community-based not-for-profit governance structure. This approach has enabled YVR to become a highly successful airport operator with an award-winning experience.

What the audience will learn

  • Integrated approaches provide an excellent return while maintaining an outstanding airport experience
  • Environmental and social initiatives are used successfully to create unique marketing opportunities
  • Attention to local authentic food choices provided in a unique terminal environment to drive customer engagement

12:50 - 14:15

Lunch

14:15

How to increase non-aeronautical revenues – the startup way

Aline Albisati
Exploitation coordinator for commercial concessions
Genève Aéroport
Switzerland
Hamidul Huq
Innovation project manager
Genève Aéroport
Switzerland
In Switzerland, everything seems more expensive! How can we make our passengers feel good and buy more or complain less about the price? Can innovation help? Can the approach used by major tech industries and Silicon Valley's best startups be applied in the airport retail industry? This is the gamble and the journey that Geneva Airport took this last year. We will share with you our journey and what we have learned on this journey.

What the audience will learn

  • How to develop an innovation culture in the airport retail environment
  • Innovation tools applied: design thinking, lean startup, business model canvas
  • Lessons in applying to the airport retail industry the approach used by major tech industries and Silicon Valley's best startups

14:45

Harnessing existing IT infrastructure to improve and monetize passenger experiences

John Rankin
COO
Skyfii
Australia
Every airport wants to better understand who its passengers are, where to improve their experiences, and how to drive more revenue from them. Fortunately, most airports already have the technology infrastructure they need to gain these insights. They just need to know how to harness it. In this presentation, we’ll discuss how you can leverage wi-fi, cameras and other data sources you already have, to better understand, improve and monetize the passenger experience.

What the audience will learn

  • How to drive retail sales with targeted, location-based messaging
  • Using wi-fi location data to trigger automated surveys about specific experiences
  • Measuring traffic flow, wait times and congestion with wi-fi and cameras
  • Optimize tenant mix based on passenger profiles and behavioral data

15:15

Using technology to make our infrastructure intelligent

Richard Irving
Business data analyst
Gatwick Airport
UK
Dr Nick Koudas
CEO
Aislelabs
Canada
Retail operations is among the fastest-growing revenue sources at airports. Therefore it needs to be managed carefully. We will discuss innovative approaches we have been employing at Gatwick Airport for this task. Obtaining a detailed understanding of the way passengers shop inside terminals is a key component of our approach. Using technology to quantify behavioral characteristics of passengers and to segment passengers by their behavior makes your infrastructure intelligent and gives the airport operator and your concessionaires actionable insight to help grow your non-aero revenue.

What the audience will learn

  • Insights on passenger retail behavior
  • How to create a live view of ‘curb to plane’ zonal occupancy
  • How to enable concessionaires to improve service and increase visitor-to-buyer conversion rates
  • How to increase store visits by >30%
  • How to improve your retail trading performance insight

15:45 - 16:00

Break

16:00

Engaging Chinese travelers on WeChat

Lay Ling Toh
Senior manager, corporate and marketing communications
Changi Airport Group (Singapore) Pte Ltd
Singapore
WeChat is China’s most popular app, with a Swiss Army Knife full of functionalities. More than 900 million Chinese use this app daily for everything from texting to shopping, watching videos, playing games, reading news and blogs and ordering food and taxis. WeChat is a must-have channel for any brands looking at engaging the Chinese. Changi Airport has built a digital ecosystem on WeChat, from communications and engagement to payment. The presentation will share how Changi Airport managed WeChat as more than just a social media channel, and the lessons learned from developing this unique platform.

What the audience will learn

  • Introduction to WeChat
  • How Changi Airport uses WeChat
  • How to leverage the functions on WeChat to serve your audience
  • Factors in running a successful WeChat account
  • Pros and cons of using WeChat as a communication channel

16:30

No more closed-door RFPs – ask passengers!

Timothy Barnes
Senior director - commercial services
The Calgary Airport Authority
Canada
By using in-theater passenger research as the first step in decision making, airports can offer retail partners more transparency, provide an equal playing field for all partners and reduce the bias of commercial teams in their own opinions. This makes way for a better process beyond the traditional RFP, and introduces a more transparent process for all stakeholders.

What the audience will learn

  • Establish a process and communicate it
  • Introduce and educate partners on the process
  • Execute the process and have checkpoints
  • Evaluate the results and feedback from partners
  • Refine and repeat

17:00

Planning for people, not processes (a human and humane experience)

Steve Collis
Managing director
JHP Design
UK
The presentation will discuss the methodology of those who contribute to terminal planning and design from the bones of the building to its finished form. It will examine how much of it is planned for the pleasure of the passenger as opposed to the satisfaction of the numerous stakeholders. It will also explain to the audience how to avoid the most common mistakes when planning the retail structure of the airport in order to make the customer experience meaningfully and positively different.

What the audience will learn

  • Why so many terminals are difficult to navigate
  • How to plan an intuitive experience for passengers
  • How well-defined terminals encourage passengers to arrive early
  • How to increase the commercial effectiveness of airports

Opening Day Party – hosted by Groupe ADP – Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Customer Service & Passenger Experience

Day 1: Tuesday, June 9

Customer Service & Passenger Experience
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Sujata Suri
Vice president – strategy and development
Hamad International Airport
Qatar
Brian Engle
Director of customer experience
Greater Orlando Aviation Authority
USA

09:05

Partnering to transform customer experiences

Kathy Haley
Chief customer experience officer - aviation
Port Authority of New York & New Jersey
USA
With hundreds of stakeholders and thousands of employees accountable for ensuring millions of details come together perfectly each day, successful airports know exceptional customer experiences begin with a unified vision. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey operates some of the busiest airports in North America, including JFK, LaGuardia and Newark. With a complex stakeholder model across four airports and 14 terminals, we have embarked on a strategy to unify the end-to-end customer experience. Driven by a common vision, we are innovating the experience through strategic alliances to reclaim a spot among the best in the world.

What the audience will learn

  • The importance of unifying stakeholders around a common understanding of the customer
  • Approaches for bringing together seemingly diverse groups with different goals
  • How setting clear targets and accountabilities influences outcomes
  • Working with partners to equip frontline staff with the customer service skills for success
  • Innovating the experience through strategic partnerships

09:35

Destination 2035 - IATA's vision of the future customer experience

Pierre Charbonneau
Director passenger experience & facilitation
IATA
Canada
The size of the travel industry is set to double by 2035. Travelers' expectations are continuously evolving. Technology has never been a more critical enabler. Collaboration between industry stakeholders will need to increase at a faster and deeper pace than ever to ensure a successful and positive transformation of the end-to-end travel experience and to meet the growth challenge. How does this all come together? IATA has developed a comprehensive vision that integrates all these elements and is working to lead this industry transformation. This presentation will show what's in store!

What the audience will learn

  • Landscape of the industry by 2035 - key drivers
  • What the customers' expectations will be
  • IATA's vision of the end-to-end passenger journey
  • How we can further engage our customers in this challenge
  • How we work differently with stakeholders to enable this vision

10:05

Targeting innovation for business success with emerging 2020 traveler tribes

Jan Richards
Head of insights and planning
Dublin Airport
Ireland
Hannah Burmanje
Insights analyst
Dublin Airport
Ireland
Air travel and travelers are changing: Dublin Airport has undertaken a major segmentation project to take us forward to 2025 to enable us to prioritize our passenger opportunities. But it’s not that simple: our Irish regulator has capped our passenger charge, so we need a ‘smart’ focus on key commercial opportunities to innovate and grow. Passenger expectations of the travel industry are growing, transforming and disrupting constantly. We introduce our priority segments, key trends and concerns, and what challenges and innovation opportunities Dublin Airport/travel organizations are developing to meet passenger needs, fulfil business demands and deliver on commercial ones.

What the audience will learn

  • Top five travel trends shaping consumer behavior: examples such as data as currency, human encounters, shoppable universe, ‘me me' personalization
  • The regulation burden: Dublin Airport’s challenging capacity demands infrastructure development when the regulator is limiting our ability to invest
  • Description of our key behavioral segments, demographics, airport needs. Our segmentation use to identify opportunities and focus on PX development
  • How we used passenger trends to overlay on segments to maximize innovation and facilitate revenue
  • Key examples from Dublin Airport and other top-100 global businesses, illustrating how segment needs are being met

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

Improving Schiphol’s passenger experience with Schiphol's PX way of working

Maaike van der Windt
Head of aviation marketing, cargo and customer experience
Amsterdam Airport Schiphol
Netherlands
To improve and innovate the quality of service at Amsterdam Schiphol, the airport's PX platform focuses on improving the passenger experience. To accelerate this process, the platform created a way of working based on so-called Living Labs in the terminal. In her presentation, Maaike will share how Schiphol uses Living Labs for live testing with passengers, and how using a staged approach helps build strong evidence toward successful deployment. She will also disclose some of Schiphol's NPS boosting concepts on topics such as security, reclaim, hygiene and hospitality.

What the audience will learn

  • Strategy in action: how a customer-centric and data-driven strategy drives passenger experience in the terminal
  • Living Labs: live-testing concepts to improve the airport experience with passengers in the terminal
  • Staged approach: guiding organizational decision making by building stronger evidence toward deployment of the concept
  • NPS boosters: selection of concepts that successfully improve the passenger experience of security, reclaim, hygiene and hospitality at Schiphol

11:25

A customer and operational journey augmented by tech

Veronique Austruy
VP airport operation - IT system and analytics
Air France
France
The presentation will explain how Air France has addressed three challenges. First, how to deal with complex environments where real-time decision capabilities are key to ensuring the best experience for customers and employees (#datasharing, #realtimeanalytics). Second, the importance of human assets in a digitized environment: the need to empower them from a soft-skills perspective as well as from a tech literacy perspective (#future of work, #agility). Finally, how to leverage technology and data on one hand and the airport ecosystem on the other, to deal with customer and employee pain points: co-innovation is a key element (#biometry, #gatesexperiment).

What the audience will learn

  • How to deal with complex environments
  • The importance of human assets in a digitized environment
  • How to leverage both tech and airport ecosystem

11:55 - 13:15

Lunch

13:15

Travel for all

Samantha Stedford
Director, customer experience
Allegheny County Airport Authority, Pittsburgh International Airport
USA
Pittsburgh International Airport has implemented innovative solutions and partnerships to help make flying an option for everyone. In 2019, PIT added NavCog, an app to help visually impaired travelers navigate the airport, and opened a world-class sensory-friendly space for individuals with neurodevelopmental challenges. Although the industry has taken steps to address the problems faced by travelers with disabilities, too often the proposed solutions come from the top down and don’t include in the planning process those who are affected most. PIT has taken steps to address this issue, including revamping the process for finding solutions and developing homegrown solutions by those affected most.

What the audience will learn

  • How airports can alleviate the stress of travel through innovative thinking, partnerships and a practical application of modern technology
  • Why solutions for common issues in the air travel industry need to be developed with the end user in mind
  • How innovative solutions to improve the customer experience can come from anywhere, including employees
  • The benefits of community-based partnerships, specifically with local universities, to develop industry-leading innovations
  • How Pittsburgh International Airport worked to develop the sensory room project and NavCog application

13:45

Sensory approaches to reduce traveler anxiety in airports

Ilana Mann
Chief innovation officer and educational specialist
Fun and Function
USA
Traveler anxiety may lead to reduced or eliminated air travel, tense interactions with airport staff, and travel disruptions. Research indicates that approximately 40% of the population reports a fear of flying, with 2.5% avoiding flying. A traveler’s anxiety is impacted by the physical environment as well as interactions with others. Sensory aspects of the environment are known to increase or reduce anxiety. Likewise, interactions with others, including staff, may increase or decrease traveler anxiety. Research indicates that staff training, environmental design and the availability of anxiety-reducing options may reduce anxiety experienced by travelers and increase travel opportunities.

What the audience will learn

  • Participants will identify the negative impacts of travel anxiety
  • Participants will describe the contextual (environmental) factors that are known to increase or decrease traveler anxiety
  • Participants will discuss initiatives to promote staff-assisted and environmental solutions to reduce traveler/passenger anxiety

14:15 - 15:15

Panel Discussion: Airport therapy dog program study

The airport therapy dog program study is a first of its kind. The study is divided into three areas: program design, customer experience and communication, and feedback program. The panel will include highlights from the study, customer experience innovation, and LAX and YUL airports as a case studies.

What the audience will learn

  • Airport therapy dog programs improve customer experience and satisfaction
  • Airport social media engagement increases after therapy dog program introduction
  • New airport innovations and community partnerships are formed through the programs
  • How airports build an airport therapy dog program
  • Why airport therapy dog programs are required
Heidi Huebner
PUP program director
Los Angeles World Airports
USA
Laura Sartain
Director of foundation programs
Airport Foundation MSP
USA
Renée Lebel
Director, customer experience
Aéroport International Montréal-Trudeau
Canada
Panel Moderator:
Cristina Alcivar, founder and editor, Vane Airport Media

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30

Five-star airport status: a case study of the innovative path to transformation

Kathleen Boyd
Chief executive officer
Kathleen Boyd & Associates
USA
Houston Airport System is so focused on 5-star status that its vision statement is built around it: 'Establish Houston as a 5-star global air service gateway where the magic of flight is celebrated'. This presentation will reveal how a singular focus on 5-star status is transforming two Texas airports and taking the team and its collaborators on an innovative journey to customer-centricity.

What the audience will learn

  • What 5-star status entails and why it matters
  • How Houston became the first city in the western hemisphere to boast two 4-star airports
  • How HAS galvanized its team members and partners around its 5-star aspirations – and your airport can do so too

16:00

Hospitality strategy: reshaping passengers' experience in departure lounges

Caroline Blanchet
Director of strategic marketing
Groupe ADP
France
Mélanie Carron
Chief marketing officer
Groupe ADP
France
The evolution of interior design and architecture has recently demonstrated once again how critical it is to think in terms of customer use in order to redefine the overall experience you want to offer to passengers before they fly from an airport. How can we get inspiration from the hotel and hospitality industry to better shape departure lounges? How can we adapt to the new generation's traveling behaviour and expectations? This presentation will focus on several use cases to explain concretely how Paris Aéroport has integrated design and hospitality into its marketing strategy.

What the audience will learn

  • How to manage the shift from traditional departure lounge design to new standards
  • The different challenges in managing such a shift
  • Benefits from bringing design and hospitality into the world of airports
  • How to impact client satisfaction through hospitality strategy
  • What Paris Aéroport future boarding lounges will look like

16:30

A pioneering approach to great passenger experience through art and culture

Evgenii Krasikov
Director of strategic communications
Airports of Regions
Russia
What does superb passenger experience look like today? How can an airport excel when great architecture, smart interior design and seamless service are practically taken for granted? The presentation will demonstrate how the local history and cultural uniqueness of a region can be captured to set up an enhanced, interactive, permanent exhibition. Using the recent examples of two Russian airports, it will explain how the names assigned to the airports were designed to create a narrative that is both enlightening and entertaining. We will look at cultural projects as stress busters and a tools for greater engagement.

What the audience will learn

  • How to integrate cultural functions in the transport hub: what works and what doesn’t
  • How authenticity creates loyalty through the example of Platov Airport, named after a prominent Russian Cossack (Russian national minority group)
  • How national pride made the airport a point of interest: the case of Gagarin Airport, named after the first cosmonaut
  • What business challenges can be addressed with art projects

17:00

The economy of the next 50 years will be run by the customer experience

Peter Shankman
Author, brand strategist, futurist
Shankman.com
USA
Imagine a universe where first-time guests automatically return, every guest experience results in positive feedback, repeat guests become loyal brand ambassadors, and your one true difference isn't price or location, but guest experience, employee empathy and trackable data. If your brand isn’t a part of this world, you’ll be eliminated. Welcome to the world of the zombie loyalists – guests who, when treated better than they expect, will do all your marketing for you, to their network, automatically, every single time. The opportunities for new customers and revenue growth are huge, but so are the pitfalls.

What the audience will learn

  • How employee empathy and customer loyalty are married, and why one can’t exist without the other
  • The worst five first impression mistakes a brand can make
  • The four rules of an enlightened guest experience
  • How you can use your guests' own wants and needs to build the perfect experience for them – without them even knowing

Opening Day Party – hosted by Groupe ADP – Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Environment & Sustainability

Day 1: Tuesday, June 9

Environment & Sustainability
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Emanuel Fleuti
Head of environment
Flughafen Zürich AG
Switzerland
Dr Mary Kerins
Head of health, safety, sustainability and environment
DAA
Ireland

09:05

Do you speak Sustainability?

Dr Mary Kerins
Head of health, safety, sustainability and environment
DAA
Ireland
The presentation will involve an outline of DAA’s sustainability strategy and progress to date against key targets. It will include a discussion of some areas where there may be tension between the implementation of sustainability initiatives and other key business objectives. Measures to address this can include developing a focused communications plan to familiarize different business units with the areas where sustainability has direct relevance for, and impact on, their activities. Other priorities may arise and undermine efforts to successfully implement such initiatives, and the organization has to adapt to ensure that sustainability remains an organizational priority. Ensuring targets are 'owned' by the business units rather than by the 'sustainability department' is important in order to embed the principles of sustainability for the longer term.

What the audience will learn

  • Balancing competing priorities implicit in sustainability
  • It is important to review and refine sustainability priorities over time
  • Effective communication is critical

09:35

Airport sustainability – climate change

Kenton Sim
Group manager
Airports Company South Africa
South Africa
Airports Company South Africa acknowledges that airport operations have an impact on climate change. This presentation discusses the measures implemented at airports to address the impact on climate change.

What the audience will learn

  • Carbon footprint
  • Measures to reduce climate change impacts at airports
  • Challenges facing airports in dealing with climate change

10:05

Climate change adaptation for airports

Firat Emsen
CTO
IGA - Istanbul Airport
Turkey
The aviation industry and airports have a significant impact on global climate change. Airports have to understand the risks and initiate adaptation measures for both existing and new infrastructure, as well as managing critical operations to become more resilient to the changing climate.

What the audience will learn

  • Potential risks to airports, risk assessment plans
  • Methods and survey responses
  • Adaptation and resilience activities
  • Case study Istanbul New Airport

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

Environmental sustainability and financial maximization

Ole Wieth Christensen
Aviation advisor
Ramboll
Denmark
Environmental sustainability and financial maximization – are the two mutually exclusive when developing the world's best airport? Having worked with senior management/boards of directors at Swedavia, Copenhagen Airport and Aarhus Airport, Ole has time and again experienced that environmental sustainability and financial maximization are seen as mutually exclusive strategic directions for airports. Sustainability is often seen as a nuisance for airport operators. This talk will aim to show how environmental sustainability and financial maximization can be achieved together rather than in conflict.

What the audience will learn

  • How sustainability can help drive financial stability
  • Explore some of the misconceptions around sustainability impacting airport profitability
  • How sustainability enhances the strategy of an airport to help drive financial performance

11:25

Whole-lifecycle carbon

Qian Li
Principal engineer
Cundall
UK
Cundall will present the Carbon Assessment Tool and construction materials database developed for Hong Kong, to access the performance of building and infrastructure projects. With demand growing for net-zero carbon development, this tool aims to drive low-carbon design at the design stage with the ability to compare options and encourage the specification of low-carbon materials to capture carbon savings. Within the tool, an industry benchmarking system has been developed to measure performance and drive change. This presentation will explain how the tool was developed and how it can be used to reduce the upfront carbon in development.

What the audience will learn

  • The importance of accounting for carbon in construction and refurbishment
  • The approach to measuring whole lifecycle carbon
  • The basis for the CIC and how it can be used to assess carbon on projects
  • Net-zero-carbon buildings and what this means

11:55 - 12:40

Panel Discussion: What does the sustainable airport of the future look like?

Tackling climate change is a task that governments and businesses around the globe are being challenged to address. The aviation sector has been singled out as potentially contributing more to carbon emissions than reducing them, and the onus is on airport owners, operators and designers to work together to achieve sustainability targets – fast. Join airport representatives from Heathrow and Bangalore International as they discuss how sustainable aviation design is possible within a range of scales and localities. Gain insights into how to improve resource efficiency, reduce embodied and operational carbon, and create better health and well-being outcomes for all.

What the audience will learn

  • Gain knowledge from real-world case studies from Heathrow and Bangalore International airports
  • How to overcome the main barriers and challenges in sustainable airport design
  • Learn about the most effective approaches in design and operations that deliver sustainable outcomes
  • Understand key technologies and growing areas of innovation
  • Learn about what still needs to be done and who needs to be involved
Satyaki Raghunath
Chief strategy and development officer
Bangalore International Airport
India
George Davies
Head of expansion sustainability and environment
Heathrow Airport
UK
Patrick Bellew
Founding director
Atelier Ten
UK
Panel Moderator:
Paul Toyne, sustainability practice leader, Grimshaw

12:40 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

Implementing MaaS platforms to reduce carbon emissions at airports

Tine Haas
Principal
Dornier Consulting
Germany
Emerging new technologies and digitization are changing the way people travel within and between urban environments. A significant amount of greenhouse gas is generated by passengers and staff traveling to and from the airport every day. Passengers will increasingly rely on mobility services rather than using private cars. This is a chance for airports to actively manage landside access and encourage a modal shift toward more sustainable travel options. By implementing new mobility and autonomous driving applications, airports can reduce the carbon footprint of their operations and improve efficiency at the same time.

What the audience will learn

  • Strategies for nudging toward more sustainable travel modes
  • Impact of new mobility and autonomous driving on airport access
  • Mobility scenarios and new business models
  • Cooperation with MaaS platform operators
  • Best practice examples

14:15

Mobility concept 2025

Julian Klaassen
Environmental engineer
Hamburg Airport
Germany
The idea to move the fleet to alternative drive systems started in 2013. To date, 73% of the fleet's vehicles have been successfully exchanged. The environmental sustainability of the ground support will be significantly improved through the Mobility Concept 2020. The overarching goal of the concept is to reduce overall CO2 emissions (and other air pollutants) at the airport. Now the concept for 2025 will be written, to continue the previous actions and to integrate innovative, modern technologies into the airport operations.

What the audience will learn

  • Alternative system drives
  • Synthetic fuels
  • Hydrogen fleet
  • CO2 emissions

14:45

The role of airports in decarbonizing aviation

Richard Matthews
Aviation director
Arup
UK
We present a roadmap for airports to support the decarbonizing of aviation. Airports lie at the heart of the industry, as the physical infrastructure that brings airlines/aircraft operators, fuel suppliers and consumers together. This key role is under increased public and political scrutiny in light of the magnitude and impact of greenhouse gas emissions from aviation. We demonstrate the real-world feasibility of the roadmap by highlighting the real actions airports can take around better airspace management, encouraging airlines to use best-in-class aircraft, provision of sustainable aviation fuels and coordinated emissions offsetting.

What the audience will learn

  • Airports bear the reputational, strategic and operational risk around expanding aviation
  • Scope 3 emissions are now within the scope of what airports are expected to address
  • Emissions reduction plans need to be robust and verifiable
  • Airports need to think holistically about how to reduce emissions effectively

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30

Sustainability roadmap for BUD

Ferenc Kis
Head of environment
Budapest Airport
Hungary
Kristof Boda
Ground transportation development specialist
Budapest Airport
Hungary
The presentation will discuss airport development after becoming the first carbon-neutral airport in CEE: initiatives toward net-zero; learning from others; designing and turning sustainability-related programs and specialized solutions into practice.

What the audience will learn

  • Major environment- and sustainability-related practices and results at BUD
  • Extension and redesign of airport sustainability portfolio
  • Current programs and development plans

16:00

Achieving zero-carbon operations by 2030 at regional airports

Mark Bailey
Director of airport planning and development
Cardiff Airport
UK
Andrew Marsh-Patrick
Technical director
WSP
UK
WSP has been working with a number of regional airports on zero-carbon roadmaps for 2030. The co-presentation with Cardiff Airport will explore how to build renewable energy and low-carbon technology innovations into the airport masterplan. The importance of regional infrastructure for future zero-carbon airport operations, logistics and surface access will be highlighted. Practical examples will be given from the ACA program and from Cardiff Airport, which has recently updated its sustainability strategy.

What the audience will learn

  • Zero-carbon roadmaps for 2030
  • Links to wider sustainability/masterplanning
  • Uptake of all-electric technologies/renewables
  • Learning from regional airport case studies
  • Progress on the ACA program in 2019

16:30

A unique combination of geothermal assets by ADP

Yannael Billard
Environment and energy senior manager
Groupe ADP
France
To achieve carbon neutrality by 2030, ADP is relying on a unique and inspiring combination of geothermal assets. In Paris-Le Bourget, ADP has operated a geothermal heat pump since 2015 (50% internal heat needs). A deeper resource, the 'Dogger', has provided Paris-Orly with 30GWh/year since 2010 (40% internal heat needs). The latter experience will be leveraged by developing new geothermal production at Paris Charles de Gaulle, due to start operation in 2024 and 2028, and providing 150GWh/year of heat, thereby hugely cutting CO2 emissions. ADP is also investigating district heating networks, along with local public territories, also relying on geothermal resources.

What the audience will learn

  • How to best use geothermal resources to reduce carbon footprint
  • Various geothermal technologies can be combined to leverage geothermal energy
  • Technological breakthrough can help to further reduce CO2 emissions in existing geothermal assets

17:00

Heathrow’s thermal strategy – the road to zero carbon

Daniel Jones
Client director
Atkins
UK
Join the presentation as we share lessons learned from the development of a groundbreaking site-wide sustainable and innovative thermal strategy at Heathrow. The project is part of Heathrow’s Expansion Project, to enable Heathrow to meet its zero-carbon 2050 target. The strategy sets out Heathrow’s heating and cooling journey to zero carbon in 2050, and uses highly efficient and environmentally friendly heat pumps to simultaneously provide heating and cooling, inter-seasonal thermal storage to increase efficiency, reduce water consumption and rationalize equipment sizes and local water sources for additional thermal extraction.

What the audience will learn

  • Understand the groundbreaking thought and innovation that will enable Heathrow to achieve zero carbon emissions by 2050
  • How can low-carbon technology and the utilization of the natural environment be used to store and reuse energy?
  • What lessons can be learned that will enable the industry to achieve net-zero emissions?

Opening Day Party – hosted by Groupe ADP – Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Future Airports

Day 1: Tuesday, June 9

Future Airports
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Rick Belliotti
Director, customer experience design and innovation
San Diego County Regional Airport Authority
USA
Kiran Merchant
CEO
Merchant Aviation
USA

09:05

TWA Hotel: rebirth of an aviation icon

Tyler Morse
CEO
MCR
USA
The iconic former TWA terminal at JFK, designed by Eero Saarinen in 1962 and abandoned since 2001, has undergone a dramatic transformation to become the TWA Hotel – a mixed-use facility with guest rooms, event space, dining and shopping at the center of JFK. Conference attendees will hear how the developer worked with 22 government agencies to preserve and adaptively reuse the historic building, bringing the jet age back to life in one of the industry's highest-profile projects.

What the audience will learn

  • Fundamentals of the airport hotel business
  • Challenges of developing on airport mixed-use real estate
  • Adaptive reuse/historic preservation in an airport environment
  • History of the TWA Flight Center and the jet age at JFK

09:35

Selaparang Aero Experience – managing former airport land

Poetri Andayani
Business development advisor
Angkasa Pura Supports
Indonesia
Selaparang Airport is a former airport in Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia. It closed in 2011 and was nearly abandoned by the airport operator. Subsequent attempts to build a flying school and training center failed due to the Lombok location not being strategic enough to achieve the necessary revenue. In 2019, the Indonesian President announced Mandalika as a tourism destination. Lombok will host MotoGP, which will increase airport passenger numbers. Through a community tourism concept, together with stakeholders, the airport operator has taken the opportunity to open the Selaparang Aero Experience as the first aero theme park in Indonesia.

What the audience will learn

  • Understand how to develop airport land bank
  • Masterplanning in a creative and efficient way
  • Creating thematic marketing that will enhance revenue

10:05

Momentum grounded: why airports need a new passenger experience playbook

Joel Couillandeau
Head of strategic planning
Groupe ADP
France
Geoffrey Ax
Principal / aviation market leader
Populous
USA
The fundamentals of airport placemaking have changed. Sure, meeting passengers’ basic needs is still crucial, but today’s travelers expect more. Their dollars demand it. They won’t pay for inauthentic experiences. They crave a taste of the city that lies just beyond landside, a glimpse of what it’s like to be a part of the hometown team. So maybe it’s time we stopped looking at them as passengers and started seeing them as fans. Airports should borrow qualities from the best stadiums and arenas that make them magnetic draws in the first place. Find out how, with two international case studies.

What the audience will learn

  • What can airports learn from the most cherished gathering places in sports when it comes to urban design and activation?
  • How do you put underutilized space to work, delighting your customers and giving them a welcome distraction from their worries?
  • What are the first steps in auditing an airport’s existing experience and learning more about its customer base?
  • How do you de-stress the airport environment and prime your customers to spend on worthwhile experiences?
  • How do you customize this new experience: a comparative US/European airport operator perspective

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

Urban air mobility – a new territory for the airport industry

Sébastien Couturier
Head of innovation
Groupe ADP
France
Urban air mobility (UAM) is a new territory to be explored by the airport industry. The holistic approach of this subject by Groupe ADP allows it to develop projects in the Paris region and abroad by combining a range of expertise in infrastructure, customer experience, air traffic control, and intermodality. The approach consists of developing an ecosystem of partners to transform this vision into reality. This new air mobility system could become a revolutionary mode of transport and a service offering unequaled customer experience and time saving.

What the audience will learn

  • Why urban air mobility can represent a great opportunity for the airport industry
  • How airports can take advantage of this new air mobility system
  • What the four complementary pillars comprising urban air mobility are
  • An example of methodology to make this new mode of transport a reality

11:25

Innovation and customer experience: driving the airport of the future

Rick Belliotti
Director, customer experience design and innovation
San Diego County Regional Airport Authority
USA
Airport operators today are grappling with the concepts of innovation and customer experience (CX). Some consider CX a simple program/project that, once done, no longer needs to be considered. Others are struggling with the concept of innovation and what that buzzword means in an airport world – and how it can exist in an operationally focused organization. In reality, both concepts are critical to building the airport of the future. This presentation will assist airport operators in understanding different approaches to innovation; how to approach innovation from a public procurement perspective; and how CX is a 'lifestyle' for airport operators to bring their airports into the future – all while using Innovation as the building block for that future.

What the audience will learn

  • Different approaches to innovation
  • How to work with procurement and general counsel to ensure that innovation can fit into 'traditional' procurement methodologies
  • Customer experience as an ongoing discipline, not a one-and-done activity
  • How innovation supports the customer experience

11:55 - 12:40

Panel Discussion: Airport Leaders Forum

The Airport Leaders Forum will discuss the future of airports and aviation; innovation and modernization; airports as brands and businesses; infrastructure and investment in their regions. The symposium will look at what is being done and what should be done in terms of infrastructure. The development of hubs or distribution centers will increase passenger traffic, generate business opportunities and positively impact the economic and social development of the region.

What the audience will learn

  • The vision of the leaders of our industry
  • Innovation and modernization
  • The future of airports and aviation
  • Airports as brands and businesses
Kadri Samsunlu
Chief executive officer
IGA - Istanbul Airport
Turkey
Candace McGraw
Chief executive officer
Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport
USA
Stewart Wingate
Chief executive officer
Gatwick Airport
UK
Panel Moderator:
Kiran Merchant, CEO, Merchant Aviation

12:40 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

The future of airport operations by Airbus

Sebastien Lavina
Airport operations expert
Airbus
France
Airbus will offer its views on the future of airport operations. Concepts and studies will be highlighted, aimed at describing the airport of the future and its interactions with current or future aircraft models. The focus will also be on innovative solutions for more environmentally friendly operations, ramp-wise and up to aircraft design. The objective will be to share views with peers and experts and engage in discussions about what the future will look like and how it could drastically change the way airport operations are organized. We will be able to compare proposals and plan for further exchanges about these current and upcoming challenges.

What the audience will learn

  • Future airport operations
  • Airport of the future
  • Ongoing studies and concepts
  • More environmentally friendly operations
  • Innovative solutions

14:15 - 15:15

Panel Discussion: Airport Innovators Forum - Creating a culture of innovation

Innovation needs to be more than just a single person in an organization with a job title, rather something that involves and includes the entire organization. Wherever possible, implementation should include a live operating environment - like an airport! It’s not just about having an innovation group; it’s about having an innovation culture: actively stimulating and accepting new ideas and always ready to alter the way “things have always been done".

What the audience will learn

  • How to create a culture of innovation and inclusion
  • Collaborating with other departments and industries
  • Moving ideas forward from the drawing board
Amy Gaddis
Managing director, design and innovation, corporate real estate
United Airlines
USA
Erik Scherff
Head of Business Technology Center
Amsterdam Airport Schiphol
Netherlands
Karin Gylin
Head of innovation
Swedavia AB
Sweden
Samuel Ingalls
Principal
Barich Inc
USA
Steve Armitage
Head of innovation and intelligent automation
Heathrow Airport
UK
Panel Moderator:
Rick Belliotti, director, customer experience design and innovation, San Diego County Regional Airport Authority

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30

Future airport under rapid change of industries and supply chain

Sanghui Lee
Manager
Incheon International Airport Corporation
Korea
The presentation will give some ideas about what roles airports should play in dealing with radical changes in industries that have used airports as nodes in the entire supply chain. With the development of IT technology and changes in consumer trends, the characteristics of products have changed. This means the supply chain should follow suit. What should airports consider and prepare for to meet the needs of the evolving supply chain as a node? The speaker will share ideas based on three practical experiences and projects that she has been involved in. They mainly relate to redesigning the supply chain and creating a new marketplace at airports.

What the audience will learn

  • Redesigning the supply chain; idea of making a cool chain/ e-commerce process from the airport's point of view
  • Creating a new marketplace; idea of establishing exchanges at the airport
  • Apply change in the supply chain of entire industries to the airport

16:00 - 17:00

Panel Discussion: Multi-billion-dollar future airport developments – the view from the top

Airport development projects are dynamic and complex due to their ever-changing needs and diverse interests of a vast group of stakeholders. Our panel includes top-level executives responsible for strategizing, defining and delivering large-scale airport infrastructure projects at large hub airports. They will share their processes and lessons learned in successfully planning and delivering multi-billion-dollar development projects at their airports. They will also discuss their vision on future trends and the needs of next-gen travelers, and what they are doing to stay ahead of the curve.

What the audience will learn

  • Future of large-scale airport development
  • Innovation and modernization
  • Emerging trends and processes
  • How to secure a return on investment while delivering a great passenger experience at an airport
Bill Poole
Senior vice president - planning and design
Denver International Airport
USA
Satyaki Raghunath
Chief strategy and development officer
Bangalore International Airport
India
James McCluskie
Deputy director planning, development and construction
New Orleans Aviation Board
USA
Panel Moderator:
Kiran Merchant, CEO, Merchant Aviation

17:00

The Future of Airports: a vision of 2040 and 2070

Marc Houalla
Managing director of Paris-Charles de Gaulle Airport
Groupe ADP
France
Gaël Le Bris
Senior aviation planner and technical principal
WSP
USA
The Future of Airports is a research initiative of the Airport Think Tank of ENAC Alumni. The project involved a diverse taskforce of over 20 aviation thought leaders. This panel, along with the research team, explored various prospective topics on the long-term future of the airport industry. They considered the future trends and potential disruptive changes, the emerging transformational innovations, their impact on practices and challenges for air transportation, and the needs in research, education and policies for anticipating and facilitating these changes.

What the audience will learn

  • Overview of the long-term trends and potential disruptive changes that will impact airports worldwide
  • Analysis of the threats and opportunities that might face the industry at the 2040 and 2070 horizons
  • Review of potential solutions for addressing the long-term challenges of the 2040 and 2070 horizons
  • Inventory of needs in research, education and policies for anticipating and facilitating the long-term evolution of our industry

Opening Day Party – hosted by Groupe ADP – Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Management & Operations

Day 1: Tuesday, June 9

Management & Operations
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Alaistair Deacon
Airport operational systems consultant
Toasty Solutions Limited
UK
Etienne van Zuijlen
Lead business development - airport operations
SITA
Netherlands

09:05

Challenges of ORAT for no-frills infrastructure at Frankfurt Airport

Sascha Koenig
Vice president infrastructure terminals
Fraport AG
Germany
Esther Nitsche
Project director
Fraport AG
Germany
As part of the expansion program at Frankfurt Airport, Fraport is currently constructing Pier G, which will provide capacity for approximately 4-5 million passengers in the first phase. The new pier is part of the all-new Terminal 3 and is intended to be used mainly by low-cost and leisure carriers. The presentation will introduce the operational concept of Pier G and how it accommodates the requirements of highly efficient airline operations. It will also focus on the operational readiness and airport transfer (ORAT) program for Pier G.

What the audience will learn

  • The challenges of a no-frills infrastructure project from an operational perspective
  • How to develop the operational concept for Pier G
  • Which innovations will be implemented in Pier G
  • How to ensure a good passenger experience in Pier G
  • How to customize ORAT to a no-frills infrastructure project

09:35

A-CDM – the end of ASAP culture

Sergio Martins
Director, ATM Latin America
Saab
Brazil
Worldwide, privatization is leading private entities to an obvious challenge: achieve best cost/benefit ratio, out of limited infrastructure. A-CDM discussions are flourishing everywhere. It is becoming evident that predictability is going to be the key to success. It is critical for airline/ground handler governance as they will be tasked with sharing accurate estimates with airside/airspace owners. As airlines' readiness times are dependent on ground handlers' performance, their predictability will be as good as that of ground handlers. So far, 'as soon as possible' has been as accurate as it could be, but stakeholders are now challenged to drastically improve predictability.

What the audience will learn

  • What A-CDM implementation actually means for airports, airlines and ground handlers
  • The paradigm shift imposed on airlines and ground handlers by A-CDM
  • The role airport concessionaries actually play in A-CDM implementation and why they should eventually go for it
  • Why A-CDM should NOT be implemented as a result of a single-stakehloder decision
  • Why airlines can not be expected to perform within an A-CDM environment before actual information sharing is implemented

10:05

Driving airport and European ATM network performance

Robert Graham
Head of airport research
Eurocontrol
France
European Commission Implementing Regulation 123/2019 states that "the network shall include airports, airspace structures and interfaces that connect them". With the renewal of its mandate, Eurocontrol is improving network services and ensuring airports play a core network role. Today's network is en-route focused, with managed departure slots complemented by departure planning information generated by airport collaborative decision making (A-CDM) airports. To improve the passenger experience and airline on-time performance, major European airports will be network integrated by synchronizing airport and network operational plans. We present the change of concept to target arrival times, collaborative processes, timeline and operational benefits.

What the audience will learn

  • Future network management
  • Full airport integration
  • Change management
  • Collaborative aspects
  • Airports as full network partners

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

How to use IoT technology to improve ACDM accuracy

Michael, Chi-Jia Chen
General manager
Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport
Taiwan
Frank Lin
Managing director, Taiwan
WSP
Taiwan
Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport (TIA) introduced its ACDM system two years ago. However, it is very difficult to get the actual in-block and off-block time from ground handling. The challenge lies in getting the ground handling team to change their behavior in regard to how they do their daily work. TIA started thinking about how to introduce new IoT technology to obtain the actual in-block and off-block time to further improve the ACDM accuracy without changing ground handling working behaviors. This case study demonstrates the successful design of the new IoT system.

What the audience will learn

  • How IoT technology can be applied to improve an airport's ACDM system
  • How to improve the efficiency of managing airside traffic
  • How to improve the efficiency of ground handling with IoT technology

11:25

SMART passenger processing: applying CDM principles for end-to-end orchestrated performance

Hans Canisius
Principal consultant
USoft BV
Netherlands
As the primary outcome of disruptions in daily operations, flight delays and their impact are key concerns for the sector. With the end-to-end passenger process as a crucial contributor to this complexity, the ability to track passengers designated for a particular flight and to continuously evaluate potential disruptions in order to mitigate these early on seems to still be a missing capability. What is needed is a means to increase control in real time and combine recognizing/predicting disruptions early on with the ability to execute mitigation measures in time to avert or minimize the impact as best as possible.

What the audience will learn

  • That A-CDM principle values have significant application potential to more areas including the passenger domain
  • What end-to-end process orchetration is and why this is the missing link in the passenger domain
  • Why cross-stakeholder orchestration in the passenger domain yields great potential and is within reach of realization
  • How disruption management and predictive insights contribute to real-time decision making processess
  • Why decision automation is a topic to consider as the next step for the coming year(s) in operational improvements

11:55 - 13:15

Lunch

13:15

Operational excellence with next-generation airport management systems

Aziz Can Aksoyek
Head of sales and business development
TAV Technologies
Turkey
TAV Technologies, part of Aéroports de Paris (ADP), is working on next-generation airport management systems and how to apply cutting-edge technologies such as big data, machine learning, IoT and mobile technologies to increase operational efficiency in airport operations. To create ‘smart airports’ of the future, TAV Technologies brings in new architectural models such as microservices, containers and the most up-to-date approaches such as user experience (UX) and design thinking (DT).

What the audience will learn

  • A global and holistic view of airport operations with accurate and complete information on flights and resources
  • New optimization methods, AI-based suggestion engines and multi KPI objective functions to meet varying optimization needs
  • Improving operational performance and efficiency by adopting big data and machine learning (ML) technologies in airport management systems
  • A modular and flexible software approach to process to the total airport management concept using microservices architecture
  • Empowering UX (user experience) and design thinking (DT) principles to remove the frictions for operational users

13:45

Smart operations: a next-generation operating model

Miriam Hoekstra - Van der Deen
Director airport operations
Amsterdam Airport Schiphol
Netherlands
In the face of its biggest capacity challenges in its 100 year history one airport has reinvented and refocused its operations, making it customer-centric and ahead of the game. Learning from other industries, Schiphol has transformed its operations from a traditional setup to a new way of working, and has learned a lot. This includes how to prepare for ever-changing circumstances and how to respond better and faster to them, and how to involve customers and make them part of improvements. Additionally, Schiphol has learned important lessons in change management. The presentation will share Schiphol's experiences.

What the audience will learn

  • What the new operating model looks like
  • What the benefits are from working in different way
  • The key lessons learned

14:15

Connected operations

Clare James
Operational excellence director
Manchester Airport Group (MAG)
UK
Jen Deegan
Head of strategic programs and transformation
Manchester Airport Group (MAG)
UK
Connected Operations is new airport operating model for MAG airports. The concept is designed to deliver a seamless guest journey, from booking to back home, and closer integration of landside and airside performance monitoring and management. It is premised around a one-truth operations plan and the seamless delivery of that plan. Having invested heavily in new infrastructure and technology, Connected Operations is our means of maximising the benefits to MAG, our customers and our guests.

What the audience will learn

  • Complexity of operation and the need to break siloed operations
  • The need for one version of the truth
  • The requirement for reliable, robust data
  • The need for automation and predictive analytics
  • It's a journey!

14:45

Increasing control of operations and financial performance at regional airports

Jelmer Melissen
Business development manager
Viggo
Netherlands
Viggo is a privately-owned airport service provider at Eindhoven Airport and Lelystad Airport in the Netherlands. A strong growth rate at the beginning of the century required Viggo to shift from the traditional ground handling of legacy carriers and charters to being a broad airport service provider handling mainly low-cost carriers. The explosion in volume and complexity led to many organizational and operational changes. This case study focuses on Viggo's implementation of the continuous improvement methodology and how evidence-based management is achieved through the creation of data-driven decision making in both the operational execution and the improvement cycles.

What the audience will learn

  • The application of the continuous improvement methodology
  • Craftsmanship extracts the most value from data
  • Data-driven decision making as a key to success
  • How the simplification of processes can increase efficiency and effectivity

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30

How an innovative bag-tag locator significantly increased customer experience

Louise Brix-Hansen
Head of airport optimization
Copenhagen Airports
Denmark
Jonathan Vincentz
Optimization and project manager
Copenhagen Airports
Denmark
This presentation introduces an innovative airport-funded digital baggage tracking tool, developed with and offered to ground handlers at the airport arrival hall at no charge. Ground handlers' customer service, in person or self-service, can now search online in real time for a specific bag tag to see if, when and where it has been scanned in CPH. The goal is to avoid passengers leaving without their baggage in cases where it is actually present. This year the system has located more than 20,000 bags (32% success rate), causing a significant reduction in mishandled baggage reports, and thereby improving the passenger experience.

What the audience will learn

  • How an airport can help increase customer satisfaction through technology
  • How an airport can collaborate with partners to obtain significant mutual benefits
  • How to achieve significant reductions in baggage reports through technology

16:00

Leading a data-cultural difference

Marc Mullan
VP data & analytics
DAA
Ireland
All industries are facing the same challenge of maximizing insights through a data-driven culture. DAA and the analytics team has turned data from 50+ sources into an actionable forward-thinking platform by eliminating a silo culture across the enterprise. Real-time KPIs are delivered to hundreds of employees and lately IoT and sensor data have paved the way to a GLI (geolocation intelligence) platform controlling the airfield and driving alerts for inspections of the infrastructure. This is turning the impossible into the possible in order to improve the passenger and employee experience.

What the audience will learn

  • Geolocation intelligence – how airfield sensor data is turned into action
  • The analytical impact of an ever-evolving and growing industry
  • About building a data-driven culture across the DAA enterprise

16:30

Transforming operational planning at London Heathrow – a case study

Shaun Dee
Capacity planning manager
Heathrow Airport
UK
Kasper Hounsgaard
Managing partner
Copenhagen Optimization
Denmark
At London Heathrow, we have been transforming our internal planning process from Excel and legacy systems to a cloud-based COTS solution. We are improving the check-in, security and baggage processes and aligning the entire planning process across operations. The selected solution allows us to make updates automatically and in real time based on continuously updated information. We are now able to make better informed operational decisions based on shared, common data. This will allow us to decrease wait times and continue to improve operations and passenger experience as we prepare for the future of airport experience.

What the audience will learn

  • How London Heathrow identified current planning maturity to identify improvement options
  • How London Heathrow carried out a procurement process to identify a state-of-the-art operational planning solution
  • How London Heathrow implemented the COTS solution in close cooperation with the supplier
  • How the future looks for London Heathrow in terms of further improving the operational plans supporting early growth

17:00

Increasing airports’ performance by enabling transparency across organizational levels

Anna Marlene Sauer
Senior consultant
Lufthansa Consulting
Germany
Current industry challenges lead to a competitive environment for airports and require a new focus on data output and its use for performance management on all organizational levels. Big data, artificial intelligence and innovative technologies are the major topics for airports worldwide. However, often overlooked is the use of existing data, automatically produced by systems and tools, for gaining transparency over passenger processes in the terminal. This speech will show how processing existing information into the right harmonized overarching KPIs and visualizing them for straightforward usage for up to top-level management can have a significant impact on an airport’s terminal performance.

What the audience will learn

  • Why it is so important to have transparency over the status-quo of existing information across your company
  • The success factors for identifying the right KPIs and how they differ from the current ones
  • How simply knowing what you don’t know enables you to find the right improvement measures in the end
  • How to avoid blaming culture and silo thinking through transparency and the right data usage across the organization
  • How airports can use automatically created data to manage the relationship with their service partners in the terminal more effectively

Opening Day Party – hosted by Groupe ADP – Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Technovation: Innovation, Transformation & PAX Journey

Day 1: Tuesday, June 9

Technovation: Innovation, Transformation & PAX Journey
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Maurice Jenkins
Division director, information systems
Miami Dade Aviation Department
USA
Al Lyons
SVP firmwide director of IT & electronic systems
HOK
USA

09:05

Autonomous service robots as new members of your terminal staff

Ulrich Hoffrichter
Manager innovation and strategy
Fraport AG
Germany
Frankfurt Airport's terminal innovation team is constantly looking for new ways to streamline processes or to create new services for passengers. One example is the ongoing proof of concept of an autonomous robot that will guide passengers to their gates and at the same time carry their hand baggage. The smart and highly attention-grabbing vehicle has already proved its skills and is now in a phase of fine-tuning.

What the audience will learn

  • What does the innovation process look like at FRA?
  • Get to know some of our key innovations in the pipeline
  • How can autonomous robots help us inside airport terminals?
  • What kind of technology is Fraport using?
  • Is it a product or a service?

09:35

Strategic technology drives passenger experience

George Andrianopoulos
Team leader business support services
Athens International Airport
Greece
Nektarios Psycharis
Team leader IT & T business analysis and project management
Athens International Airport
Greece
The presentation will depict the challenges and opportunities of a modern airport technology agenda. The emphasis will be on technology-driven airports and the impact of these technologies on passenger experience. This session will cover case studies such as enhancing passenger seamless travel utilizing biometrics , use of robotics (pepper), etc, which improve the passenger journey and create operational efficiencies.

What the audience will learn

  • The challenges of a modern airport technology agenda with simple examples driven by stakeholders’ needs
  • The impact of a technology-driven airport on pax experience while addressing a number of POCs
  • The challenges and benefits of biometrics technology aimed at significantly improving the passenger experience
  • How passenger experience can be affected while utilizing robotics
  • The journey of a technology-driven airport toward digital transformation

10:05

Lyon Airport – Vinci Airports center of excellence for customer experience

Valérie Vesque-Jeancard
France & Americas area director
Vinci Airports
France
With more than 20 innovation projects underway, Lyon Airport has been chosen by Vinci Airports to be one of its three centers of excellence, focusing on customer experience. Experiments are being carried out in several fields to offer passengers a personalized and enjoyable journey: automated valet parking solution, chatbot, marketplace to find services provided both by airport and partners, check-out and delivery of luggage at home, special services for premium passengers and families, and soon a biometric end-to-end journey. The center of excellence relies on strong involvement of airport teams, specific tools and methods, and an incubator.

What the audience will learn

  • Lyon is home to world premieres in terms of customer service: first outdoor automated valet parking
  • Lyon coordinates customer experience innovation projects for the VINCI Airports network, such as biometric journey, innovative luggage services and marketplace
  • Specific organization, methods and tools to foster the emergence of ideas within the airport as well as open innovation
  • A customer-centric approach recognized by ACI Europe in 2019: Best European Airport (10-25 million pax category)

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

Transforming the air passenger terminal experience with biometrics

Greg Forbes
Managing director - airport experience
Delta Air Lines
USA
Raffie Beroukhim
Senior vice president
NEC Corporation of America
USA
Since the initial launch of the first curb-to-gate biometric experience in Atlanta’s International Concourse F, Delta Air Lines has expanded biometric services at international departure gates in at least 6 airports across the US, with more to come. But building this experience was a complex project that required countless hours of preparation, design and persistence. Exactly how did Delta, in partnership with the Department of Homeland Security and NEC, team up to design and deploy such an innovative experience at some of the country’s busiest airports?

What the audience will learn

  • Why facial recognition is becoming the de facto biometric technology for the aviation customer experience (CX)
  • Insights into Delta/NEC’s co-development of biometric technology for use in a passenger terminal environment
  • The challenges and barriers to adoption and deployment, and how the group worked together to overcome them
  • Results from the past 18 months of deployments and where the program is heading next for Delta

11:25

The seamless future of the airport journey

Ahmad Al Lawati
Acting head of ICT strategy
Oman Airports
Oman
Biometric travel has been at the forefront of aspiration for airports across the world. As technology improves, the aviation industry has welcomed the change and begun to leverage it to increase both security and facilitation, two terms that historically sat on opposing sides of the balance. The implementation of such technology stretches across many use cases, which will lead to improvements in operational performance, commercial revenues and the guest experience.

What the audience will learn

  • Experience of Oman Airports in single-token journey implementation
  • Lessons learned from a first-of-its-kind virtual tunnel for emigration using biometrics
  • Further use cases regarding biometric travel and the importance of running trials
  • Strategy framework for implementation of proof of concepts

11:55 - 12:55

Panel Discussion: Biometrics big picture

We will discuss the current state of biometrics in the aviation industry, including opportunities, challenges, privacy concerns and what the early results are telling the industry. Why does biometrics matter to the industry and passengers? How are airlines/airports currently adapting? Early results to quantify ROI and payback? What are the primary barriers to adoption – social (bias/privacy), technical and economic? What is the role of privacy? What are the early results revealing about the technology, human behavior and future opportunities?

What the audience will learn

  • Why does it matter to the industry and its passengers?
  • How are airlines/passengers currently adapting?
  • What are the early results?
  • What are the primary barriers to adoption?
  • What does the future hold?
Katherine Goudreau
Managing director, facilities
American Airlines
USA
Hans Thilenius
Deputy executive director, terminal development and improvement program
Los Angeles World Airports
USA
Nathan Sims
Project manager
Burns & McDonnell
USA
Panel Moderator:
Stu Garrett, director of aviation technology, Burns & McDonnell

12:55 - 14:15

Lunch

14:15

How easyJet improves customer experience with self bag drop while optimizing its proposition

Thomas Doogan
Head of commercial ops revenue
EasyJet Airline Company Limited
UK
Declan Austin
Managing director
Materna IPS
UK
In 2016 easyJet started a transformation project at London Gatwick Airport. Within this project the airline moved from a split-terminal operation to a new passenger experience with a 100% self-bag-drop offer for its passengers. Thanks to the automated processes, the stakeholders, airline, airport and passengers benefit from reduced waiting times and high-speed service. To give passengers more comfort, easyJet added functionalities such as Chip and PIN payments and biometrics. The airline is a pioneer in digitization and automation while creating new revenue opportunities. This helps it strengthen its proposition.

What the audience will learn

  • How it’s a win-win for everyone – passengers, airline, airport
  • Adding more functionality – Chip and PIN payments, biometrics
  • How to automate certain processes
  • How to create new revenue opportunities

14:45 - 15:15

Panel Discussion: A new age for automated gates in airports

Self-boarding gates have been used for about two decades in airports with mixed adoptions around the world. Biometrics integration is helping to make a business case for the deployment of these gates. Other areas of the airport are increasingly being equipped with automated gates: access to the security checkpoint, access to terminal shuttle trains, and access to international departure areas. Technology improvements in terms of unicity detection, reliability and costs make automated gates an appealing solution to improve efficiency and the customer experience.

What the audience will learn

  • A new use case for automated gates in airports – bringing higher efficiency, reduced manpower costs and improved passenger experience
  • The high unicity detection of modern e-gates allow them to efficiently handle autonomous operations
  • The innovative uses of gates in airports (panel examples)
  • Benefits are not limited to boarding gates
Douglas Wycoff
Senior manager client services and innovation
Tampa International Airport
USA
Eric Montplaisir
Deputy director, passenger process evolution
Aéroports de Montréal
Canada
Mara Winn
Acting division director of the Innovation Task Force
Transportation Security Administration
USA
Pedro Ferreira Alves
SVP global business development for passenger flow facilitation and border control
Idemia
France
Panel Moderator:
Herve Muller, general manager, North America, Easier

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30

Passengers flows at airports: big data and operational performance

Bastien Bernard
Airport operations director
Groupe ADP
France
Major airports are facing – or will likely face in a near future – flow capacity constraints (ground transportation, check-in, security checks, border controls, etc) degrading flight punctuality and passengers and airlines' satisfaction. Airports are becoming more and more 'smart' but are themselves complex ecosystems to optimize. As available data skyrockets and passengers' expectations are still getting higher and higher, big data applications are promising. This presentation looks at how figures can help to better understand the airport processes and improve operational performance efficiently.

What the audience will learn

  • Why looking at passengers flows at airports is relevant today and even more tomorrow
  • What the main airport capacity bottlenecks are and how critical they are
  • Why airports operators definitely need big data to further optimize their operations
  • How big data can help airport operators to optimize operations
  • What the main prerequisites are to implement a big data project to improve airport operations

16:00

Evolution of Toronto Pearson Airport in today’s data-driven society

Martin Boyer
Vice president
Greater Toronto Airports Authority
Canada
The presentation will discuss Toronto Pearson Airport’s evolution in transforming vast streams of data into seamlessly flowing information for predictive airport analytics to enhance the passenger experience and the operational efficiencies of the airport. During this evolution, we explore how the airport is preparing for the next generation of technology by leveraging data as a strategic asset to position the airport to meet KPIs and encourage innovation across departments. We also look at how the airport has leveraged blockchain to share and distribute information to further enhance the passenger experience when it comes to tracking baggage.

What the audience will learn

  • How the airport created a unified view of the organization and its data
  • Effectively using data for predictive and preventative maintenance
  • Data as a facilitator for decisions
  • Blockchain: what steps we can take to create a distributed ledger that allows us to work actively with multiple Canadian airports

16:30

Sharing airport data – increasing the value of digital assets

Aneil Patel
Vice president, air policy
ACI NA
USA
There is a need for airport operators to create a collective value for all stakeholders. Airport operators continuously collect data and information related to the physical and operational characteristics of all of the airport facilities. The Airport Data Portal is the data aggregator for third parties (such as airlines, travel apps, etc) that can access data for multiple airports in a standardized format using a single portal. Passengers want access to accurate and real-time information from airports, which is often provided via third parties. Airports create more collective value in providing an industry Airport Data Portal.

What the audience will learn

  • Understand the value of an industry Airport Data Portal
  • Case study: Real-time TSA security wait times from six airports, with three different solution providers in a standardized format
  • Reduced operating costs, as airports don’t have to develop their own airport data portals
  • Potential new revenue opportunities for airports by leveraging their digital assets

17:00

Cross-company data sharing: understanding passenger benefits and complexity for stakeholders

Wolfgang Bublitz
Managing consultant
Lufthansa Consulting
Germany
Today, it is common knowledge that increased data sharing can help to solve issues alongside the customer travel journey. However, where to start? What is needed to successfully establish data sharing with another party? The presentation will show that starting with the customer perspective is the key approach to identifying win-win use cases. Most importantly, actual use cases will be discussed in which the involved parties managed to set up a successful method of data sharing. Corresponding strategic rationales, challenges and opportunities will be examined from the passenger's as well as the sharing party’s perspective.

What the audience will learn

  • Which pain points from a passenger perspective can be solved through increased cooperation and data sharing (airports, airlines)
  • What others have done to solve customer pain points through increased data sharing (use cases)
  • What forms of data sharing have worked and what is needed to make it work
  • The strategic role of data integration and a respective integration platform within a company’s data inflows and outflows
  • Learn from others about the challenges they encountered on the way and how they were addressed (including GDPR)

Opening Day Party – hosted by Groupe ADP – Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Airport Cities, Transport Connections & Regions (Continued)

Day 2: Wednesday, June 10

Airport Cities, Transport Connections & Regions
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chair

Léa Bodossian
Managing partner
Airspire
Belgium

09:05

Regional connectivity scheme, with a particular focus on India

Nandita Bhatt
Joint general manager architect
Airports Authority of India, Indian Aviation Academy
India
As the Indian economy grows, consumption-led growth in populated metros is expected to spill over to hinterland areas. This is also expected to be due to production becoming more expensive in the densely populated metro cities. In this scenario, air connectivity can provide the required impetus to the economic growth of regional centers. In this context, one of the key objectives of NCAP 2016 is to 'establish an integrated ecosystem that will lead to significant growth of the civil aviation sector'.

What the audience will learn

  • Geographical spread: how the vast country is connecting various regions
  • Collaborations: government, state governments, operators and airlines
  • Giving new meaning to air connectivity; minimum cost
  • Resource management: using existing airstrips; upgrading or revival
  • Employment generator

09:35

How a region can positively affect local airport development

Marja Aalto
Director air transportation development
Business Tampere Oy
Finland
It's difficult to get airlines to commit to flight operations in remote areas of Europe. When the market is closed, the location is far away, and your region is unknown by airlines and tour operators, and when there are only a few airlines operating from your airport – is there a way to make you known to the world? This presentation showcases how a small region can take matters into its own hands and raise the awareness of its existence. With succesful marketing and development work, Tampere region has gone from being a hidden and unknown place to a known opportunity for new companies.

What the audience will learn

  • How a region can be a key operator in air transportation development work
  • The power of collaboration by regional companies when the working budget is low
  • How to market your regional industry and city development into a successful and accessible destination
  • How to connect local interest groups to support you and work together towards the same target
  • The power of visibility and strength in numbers internationally despite being small and unknown

10:05

Air-rail link transport-oriented development: the Green Way

Julianna Moats
Principal engineer
WSP
UK
The Green Way, a new rail link to Heathrow Airport, blends sustainable airport access with sustainable job and housing growth in the west of London, using new connectivity to spur transport-oriented development. This presentation will detail the design evolution, the public-private joint working practices, the political engagement requirements, and advice for other air-rail schemes to enhance business cases and political appeal.

What the audience will learn

  • Air-rail link design for transport-oriented development
  • Public-private joint working practices
  • Political engagement process for air-rail schemes in the UK

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

An innovative Learning Lab at the center of CDG Airport

Elisabeth Le Masson
Delegate for economic development and job creation
Groupe ADP
France
The companies of the airport area have difficulty recruiting employees trained in the basic skills required for working in an international, customer-focused and increasingly digitized environment. Employees have to adapt to organizational and technological changes. Paradoxically, the training organizations in the airport area often face not fully booked training sessions. In addition, some students stop the training session before the end or struggle with traditional learning methods. The Learning Lab will be an ecosystem of experimentation and innovation on new forms of work and collaborative learning at the heart of CDG Airport.

What the audience will learn

  • The challenge for companies: find the required and most needed skills
  • The challenge for training organizations: recruit and motivate the students
  • What the Learning Lab will be

11:25

Reducing airports' property tax bills

Mike Brown
Honorary Research Fellow Imperial College London
Strategic Advice for Great Airports
Canada
Most airports pay taxes or business rates to local municipalities or make payments in lieu. Negotiations over these payments can often be described as 'vigorous'. What most airports fail to realize is that their investment in airport infrastructure and in building connectivity capitalizes the value of commercial properties off-airport, even at smaller airports and at a considerable distance from the airport. This value uplift benefits the municipality and should be considered a credit to the airport’s account. At the very least, this uplift allows municipalities to fund additional programs and investments, which should be highlighted in the airport’s economic impact assessments.

What the audience will learn

  • How airports affect commercial property values around them, with examples from Canada and the UK
  • How this beneficial uplift manifests itself in increased tax revenues for the host municipality
  • How the beneficial uplift occurs at large and small airports

11:55 - 12:40

Panel Discussion: Territorial impacts on the airport of tomorrow

What are the challenges and opportunities that local authorities and communities will bring to the airport of tomorrow? Exploring the interconnection between land use planning, environmental concerns and airport growth, looking at the next decades, how is the role of local actors changing the face of airport areas?

What the audience will learn

  • The role local authorities play in airport development
  • Citizen concerns – are they always heard?
  • How do communities perceive airport growth?
  • Best practices from local authorities in terms of land use planning in airport areas
  • Best practices in working together: local authorities and airports
Johanna Rajala
District architect Aviapolis
City of Vantaa
Finland
Bernadette Quinn
Senior executive planner
Fingal County Council
Ireland
Alexandre Pueyo
Departmental councillor - Cergy 2
Cergy
France
Joachim Wempe
Managing partner
GeräuscheRechner
Germany
Panel Moderator:
Marius Nicolescu, secretary general, Airport Regions Conference

12:40 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

CONNECT | EVOLVED – a skyport for the city

John Trupiano
Principal
Corgan
USA
After the Uber Mega Skyport concept – CONNECT – was introduced, the designers were asked to apply what they learned from developing a solution for major episodic events to a scaled-down version appropriate for the urban environment. CONNECT | EVOLVED approaches air mobility on an urban scale with a solution that can easily be placed into the existing community framework. It explores the dynamics of a newly constructed Skyport as well as how to adapt the solution to repurpose existing infrastructure in the urban core.

What the audience will learn

  • Development of urban skyport operations, capacity and scalability
  • How the skyport connects the city
  • Importance of modularity and a kit of parts to facilitate speed to market
  • Enhancements to the community and social infrastructure
  • How to repurpose and extend the life of existing infrastructure

14:15 - 15:15

Panel Discussion: Urban air mobility: arriving soon at your airport

Urban air mobility is an emerging technology anticipated to see rapid growth in the coming decades, providing new connectivity between airports and cities. This panel will explore the topic of integrating UAM services into airports, covering requirements for infrastructure, aircraft and passenger operations and airspace requirements. A key integration aspect will focus on the essential collaboration between the main system partners: aircraft manufacturers, operators, airports and ATC. Taking the experience of the panelists from undertakings in the USA, Australia and Germany, the panel will discuss the approach to making a success of eVTOL operation and integration in the airports.

What the audience will learn

  • How to establish and integrate a quality passenger service and experience
  • What are the regulatory challenges?
  • Who are the main parties to be involved?
  • What are the infrastructure and aircraft handling challenges?
  • How can UAM operations be integrated into the airport’s airspace and ATC?
Jens Grabeleu
Vice president information management
Fraport AG
Germany
Ansgar Sickert
Liaison to EASA
Fraport AG
Belgium
Andre Biestmann
Director airspace and ANS support
DFS Deutsche Flugsicherung GmbH
Germany
Jörn Jaeger
Head of airspace integration and infrastructure
Volocopter GmbH
Germany
Panel Moderator:
Paul Hermans, senior airport planner, Arup

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30

How emerging new mobilities will revolutionize air transport and cities

Manuel Chaufrein
CEO and founder
Avairx
France
Through an analysis of airport areas sustainable development goals, we will analyze how emerging transport systems and new mobilities represent new challenges and offer fantastic opportunities that airport managers may seize to support their growth and develop new business.

What the audience will learn

  • Airport areas future mobility and renewable energy panorama
  • Next steps toward future airport areas transport planning
  • Going beyond future air travel crisis
  • What's emerging in cities and airport areas
  • Developing airport area mobility and business nodes

16:00

The airport – a playground for autonomous mobility

Hélène Bout
Innovation project manager
Groupe ADP
France
Improving access and mobility at an airport is a crucial issue. To meet these challenges, airports leverage a wide range of mobility solutions, including autonomous mobility. After successful first experiments, it is time to establish ambitious roadmaps for autonomous mobility at airport platforms to identify and prioritize the implementation of use cases, whether for the transport of goods or passengers, landside as well as airside, indoors and outdoors. This unprecedented work will help to structure airports' approach to autonomous mobility by offering the emergence of real services that are useful to passengers and airline customers.

What the audience will learn

  • Methodology to build an autonomous mobility roadmap
  • Diversity of autonomous mobility scenarios at an airport
  • Criteria for selecting priority services

16:30

Autonomous vehicles and systems at airports: guidelines and use cases

Dr Kirk Goodlet
Director, terminal operations
Winnipeg Airports Authority
Canada
Arturo Garcia-Alonso
Managing director
Airport Intelligence SL
Spain
This past November, ACI World released the publication 'Autonomous Vehicles and Systems at Airports - 2019'. This report, developed by a taskforce of airport experts from the ACI Facilitation and Services Standing Committee, is designed to increase the aviation community’s familiarity with autonomous machines and technologies. In this panel, several members of this taskforce will discuss some of the first attempts at integrating autonomous machines in airports and identify key opportunities and concerns related to this new technology.

What the audience will learn

  • Autonomous vehicles (AV), autonomous equipment, robots and other related systems
  • AV trends
  • Current applications using autonomous vehicles at airports
  • Why airports should consider autonomous vehicles
  • Case studies

17:00

New Mobility Services and the mobility hub of the future

Bruno Mario Lochbrunner
Mobility entrepreneur
SBB AG
Switzerland
The mobility of the future is on our doorstep and SBB AG want to contribute to shaping this future. This is why the New Mobility Services unit was launched in 2019 with the aim of rethinking and redefining mobility on the road, in the air and on water. This applies to the whole of Switzerland, as a model for the rest of the world. The mobility hub will be an important pivotal point in this future. SBB has taken on the task of further developing this hub and designing its mobility areas (for example parking areas).

What the audience will learn

  • Learn what SBB did to improve the travel journey, mobility and customer experience
  • How innovation and agile project management can work
  • Learn from a different mobility hub – the train station
  • Learn how digital transformation can work
  • Learn about special topics, including parking and customer information

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS Ceremony & Drinks Reception! Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Airport Design, Planning & Development (Continued)

Day 2: Wednesday, June 10

Airport Design, Planning & Development
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Paolo Bianchi
Head of infrastructure strategy and planning
Bologna Airport
Italy
Mark Wolfe
Principal
Hassell
Australia

09:05

Developing Victoria’s gateway

Simon Gandy
Chief strategy and development officer
Australia Pacific Airports Corporation
Australia
From strategy to operation, this presentation will explain how we are shaping and delivering a future airport that Melbournians can be proud of.

What the audience will learn

  • Connecting strategy to delivery
  • Creating the experience Melbournians will be proud of
  • Maintaining our sustainable footprint
  • Centering the customers in what we do
  • Competing where we need to

09:35

Delivering the Manchester Airport T2 Transformation Project

James Lord
Engineering/delivery director
Manchester Airport Group (MAG)
UK
Julian Sheppard
UK aviation sector director
BuroHappold Engineering
UK
Manchester Airport Group is investing £1.2bn to transform Manchester Airport into a world-class operation with significant enhancements to current facilities and major improvements to customer experience. The transformation will see Terminal 2 more than double in size through a terminal extension, new airfield piers, baggage halls and a short-stay car park as well as airfield efficiencies to maximize the potential of Manchester’s two runways. The presentation will focus on how the combined client and consultant team steered the design while overcoming considerable program and operational constraints.

What the audience will learn

  • Stakeholder collaboration through design and construction phases to drive optimal benefits for the airport
  • Adapting the masterplan and the design to meet emerging and evolving airport and airline requirements
  • How the design process adopted computer scripting and automation to respond to evolving design requirements and achieve project timescales

10:05

Heathrow West – the alternative proposal for expansion at Heathrow

Graeme Power-Hosking
Design and delivery director
Heathrow West Ltd
UK
Maurice Rosario
Director
Scott Brownrigg
UK
The Heathrow West proposal provides for all expansion in one location with a significant reduction in land take, and environmental and community impacts. Working with airlines and operating partners, it provides an affordable solution that will create a new West terminal campus between a new Terminal 6 and existing Terminal 5 with an integrated transport interchange at its heart. The vibrant design is responsive to its context; it is flexible, sustainable and prioritizes hospitality, safety and security. A design informed at every step by the needs of all customers, it strives to provide hospitality standards that ensure passengers become our ‘guests’ of the future.

What the audience will learn

  • How design excellence can be driven through competition
  • About the nature and challenges of a competing DCO (development consent order)
  • Community and consumer engagement benefits in development and design
  • The challenges of meeting the ANPS
  • The potential for more than one operator for an airport

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

Developing for airport growth in a tourism-focused city

Chris Mills
Chief executive officer
Queensland Airports Limited
Australia
The presentation will explain how current masterplanning and development activity is transforming Gold Coast Airport to meet growth needs, optimize customer experience and deliver shareholder value. The Gold Coast is an area where tourism is the number one industry, and the airport provides an important first and last impression. A significant development program is underway to meet these needs. In 2018 the city hosted the Commonwealth Games, which delivered a number of key lessons.

What the audience will learn

  • How adjacent development sites are managed with different stakeholders
  • Airport capacity needs in a tourism-focused city
  • How retail strategies are developed to meet customer needs and optimize returns
  • Key lessons from hosting a major sporting event (the 2018 Commonwealth Games)

11:25

This is not (only) a passenger terminal

Michele Miedico
Head of planning, environment & compliance department
Naples International Airport
Italy
Federico Raja
Airports planning
Ge.S.A.C. SpA - Naples International Airport
Italy
Like the famous painting 'Ceci n’est pas une pipe' by René Magritte, we too may say that the new passenger terminal at Salerno Pontecagnano Airport is not only a passenger terminal: it is definitively something more! The new terminal is part of an innovative project that will bring a new dimension to the airport. The design of the terminal will apply innovative schemes, with a new sustainability vision. This means new investments, a new landscape, and a new cultural identity - in short: a new life.

What the audience will learn

  • A smart approach to airport masterplanning, considering minimum land acquisition
  • How to design a fashionable, cost-effective and environmentally friendly passenger terminal
  • How to give a new identity to a greenfield site

11:55 - 13:15

Lunch

13:15

Western Sydney Airport – a new gateway to Australia

Scott Ifield
GM airport planning and technology
Western Sydney Airport Company
Australia
Cristiano Ceccato
Director
Zaha Hadid Architects
UK
Western Sydney Airport (WSA) is a new greenfield airport in Badgerys Creek in the western district of Sydney. WSA is the only new airport to be constructed in Australia for over a generation and is the largest federal government project under development today. This presentation will showcase how WSA was developed from its inception through to the selection process for the master architect. The audience will learn about the airport's phased growth, and how the design for the terminal is built on sustainable planning principles and modular architecture to create an unmistakable new national gateway to Australia. ZHA and COX were appointed as master architect in late October 2019.

What the audience will learn

  • Airport planning
  • Passenger terminal design
  • Sustainable design
  • Phased development
  • Modular expansion

13:45

Solidarity Hub – shaping the future with innovative ideas and solutions

Franciszek Ryczer
Director of design and engineering, airport planning and development
Solidarity Transport Hub Poland
Poland
Przemysław Walędziak
Airport planning manager
Solidarity Transport Hub Poland
Poland
Solidarity Transport Hub is a greenfield airport project in the heart of Europe with ambition to become the main Central Eastern European transport hub, while becoming a state-of-the-art airport of the future. How to ensure that what is envisioned and planned today will be modern and incorporate future technologies when opened? How to prepare for technologies that are not yet dreamed of? In the form of a verbal duel, our speakers will present how to effectively plan and deliver a project while remaining extremely flexible and adaptive to changing trends.

What the audience will learn

  • What it means to be one of the top 10 airports in the world and what a next-generation airport is
  • Seeing the future? How to plan the future airport today
  • How to make decisions and deliver a project that is precise yet flexible
  • Are the uncertain technologies and processes of the future a risk or an opportunity and how to manage them
  • Shaping the future – is it science or witchcraft?

14:15

Building an airport that reflects your region

Paul Hoback
Chief development officer
Pittsburgh International Airport
USA
Pittsburgh International Airport has engaged a world-class design team to incorporate the region’s best assets (nature, technology, community) into the design and construction of a new US$1.1bn terminal and multi-modal complex set to open in 2023. The airport is collaborating with local vendors, small businesses, disadvantaged business enterprises, artists and stakeholders to create a facility that truly reflects and embodies the community. The airport has established program advisory groups and incorporated principles of universal design and operational readiness into all program phases to ensure that the new Pittsburgh International will be an unforgettable destination for 10 million annual travelers.

What the audience will learn

  • How mid-size, former hub airports like Pittsburgh International can modernize facilities to accommodate changes in the aviation industry and region
  • How the terminal design team was chosen and immersed into the Pittsburgh community before formal project design phases began
  • How the program management and design teams have engaged community stakeholders in the Terminal Modernization Program
  • Why holistic integration and collaboration among airport staff, consultants and the community is essential to any airport capital program
  • How designs based on local assets are essential to building support and creating a unique sense of place at airports

14:45

Ilan and Asaf Ramon International Airport

Amir Mann
Architect
Mann-Shinar Architects & Planners
Israel
Ramon International Airport is Israel's first civil airport built from scratch (greenfield), servicing the Red Sea resort city of Eilat and the surrounding region. Commissioned by the Israel Airport Authority, the project was handled from A to Z by the architects in their role as design managers, leading to significant achievements: completion within budget, significantly lower than similar projects in the world; on time with unusually tight schedules, leading over 45 consultant and planning teams; a completely new international airport, unified under one design – from masterplan to check-in counter, technologically cutting-edge, 'green' and environmentally friendly through creative site-specific solutions.

What the audience will learn

  • Challenges in planning Israel's first civil greenfield airport
  • The dual role of the architect as project manager
  • A complete greenfield airport on budget and on schedule
  • A futuristic desert mirage: one cohesive design language unifying an entire airport, from façade to check-in counter
  • What it means to build an airport in the middle of the desert, with no nearby infrastructure

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30

The evolution of agreements between airlines and airports

Katie Cooper
Head of transformation
Melbourne Airport
Australia
Melbourne Airport recently acquired the 40-year-old Terminal 1 (T1) from Qantas for AUD$276m. Qantas remains as the operator within this facility and the transition will take 18+ months. This presentation is about sharing how we are working collaboratively and in partnership with our major airline customer, while improving the passenger experience and achieving financial returns.

What the audience will learn

  • Airline and airport relationship criticality
  • How to transition responsibilities of terminal building functions while remaining operational
  • How to improve the passenger experience with your major customer
  • Improved efficiency of asset utilization for both airline and airport benefit
  • Investments require financial returns – how to ensure you achieve them collaboratively

16:00 - 16:45

Panel Discussion: Designing to world class – JFK International Airport

We are developing a masterplan for JFK International Airport’s redevelopment. This panel discussion will highlight what makes a world-class airport that goes beyond amenity, and how JFK’s masterplan celebrates the essential qualities of New York City to ensure a memorable passenger journey. Huntley Lawrence will discuss the Port Authority’s ambitions for the airport and how this was developed, Mott will discuss the Port Authority’s ambitions and its integral work on governance, and Grimshaw will offer a perspective on design excellence.

What the audience will learn

  • The specific tools and strategies used to develop best-in-class facilities and operations
  • How the study of nearby neighborhoods is shaping the framework
  • Specific design solutions that will provide unprecedented benefits to users
  • Challenges we faced and solutions
  • How multiple stakeholders on a large team can work together to deliver the highest-caliber results based on their individual expertise
Huntley Lawrence
Director, aviation department
Port Authority of New York & New Jersey
USA
Mark Husser
Partner
Grimshaw
USA
Panel Moderator:
Chris Chalk, global aviation sector leader, Mott MacDonald

16:45 - 17:30

Panel Discussion: Increasing capacity within an existing terminal

Today’s commercial service airports are experiencing unprecedented growth and passenger activity levels. Airport real estate comes at a premium cost, if it is available at all. At Los Angeles International Airport Terminal 1, Southwest Airlines has partnered with LAWA to modify and renovate their existing facilities to address increased passenger levels while providing an authentic LA experience – within the existing Terminal 1 footprint. This panel will share lessons learned from this multi-year project, with a focus on how impacts to ongoing operations and passenger experience were managed, while resolving facility capacity and passenger amenity needs.

What the audience will learn

  • How to deliver a positive customer experience throughout an active terminal modernization program
  • How to manage complex terminal renovation projects in an active environment
Stephen Sisneros
Managing director - airport affairs
Southwest Airlines
USA
Don Ostler
Program manager
Southwest Airlines
USA
Matthew Ross
Senior vice president
AvAirPros
USA
Panel Moderator:
Tim Hudson, prinicpal, Gensler

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS Ceremony & Drinks Reception! Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Airport Design, Planning & Development – Middle East & Asia

Day 2: Wednesday, June 10

Airport Design, Planning & Development – Middle East & Asia
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Ashwini Thorat
Head Airport Planning
GVK
India
Jacques Khoriaty
Middle East & South Asia aviation director
Egis
United Arab Emirates

09:05

How to win a Chinese aviation competition

Max Connop
Global design principal
Aedas
Hong Kong
In 2018, an international airport competition was announced in Yantai, a key gateway business city in the eastern province of Shandong. Five teams comprising of both local and international consultants submitted designs. This presentation will explain the strategic approach the winning team took to develop their concept submission and how this approach provides a good framework for subsequent Chinese aviation projects. Challenging masterplan assumptions, concourse flexibility, stand optimization, risk-mitigated structure and culturally relevant design all contributed to the winning concept. Following the win, the team further enhanced the competition scheme focusing on the client’s key drivers.

What the audience will learn

  • How to identify the main client drivers on Chinese aviation competitions, and use them to strategize concept approaches
  • Understanding the Chinese aviation competition process, and applying this practical understanding to the positioning and optimizing of the submission
  • The benefits of smart engineering and planning, mitigating construction risk and actively future-proofing for flexibility
  • Balancing effective planning and efficient structure with culturally relevant concepts

09:35

Capacity requirements and operational efficiency

Ioannis Metsovitis
SVP operations
Hamad International Airport
Qatar
Airport expansion plans to support the growth in airline demand and accommodate the preparations for mega-events.

What the audience will learn

  • Growth and demand – future capacity requirements
  • Operational efficiency
  • Accommodating preparations for mega-events
  • Expansion plan challenge and approach
  • The solution

10:05

New development and innovation plans at Haneda Airport

Kyosuke Hirano
Manager, PR and Branding Strategy Office
Japan Airport Terminal Co Ltd
Japan
Haneda Airport's passenger terminals are being expanded and renovated to accommodate increasing demand. Slots at Haneda Airport will be increased by 39,000 just before the 2020 Games in next year's summer schedule. There are plans to introduce innovative new technologies such as fast travel and One ID. The presentation will discuss these topics and share some of the measures taken to prepare for the upcoming Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

What the audience will learn

  • How to accommodate big events such as the Olympics and Paralympics
  • Difficulties in implementing new technologies
  • How to improve security levels without affecting customer satisfaction

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

BLR 2030: reimagining India's fastest-growing gateway

Satyaki Raghunath
Chief strategy and development officer
Bangalore International Airport
India
The presentation will focus on the masterplan update for Kempegowda International Airport, Bengaluru (KIAB). This will include development strategies to meet demand through 90 mppa by 2030.

What the audience will learn

  • Investing in capacity at one of the fastest-growing airports in the world
  • How digital innovation and transformation are helping us
  • Airport city development
  • Economic growth and value addition

11:25

An airport for the people

Mohamed Yousif Al Binfalah
Chief executive officer
Bahrain Airport Company
Bahrain
Due to the ever-expanding aviation industry, the Kingdom of Bahrain’s Ministry of Transportation and Telecommunications alongside Bahrain Airport Company have immersed themselves in developing an encyclopedic project known as the Airport Modernization Program. The AMP aims at elevating Bahrain International Airport by means of updating the current infrastructure and services. Given the size of the project, it is expected that the airport’s capacity will increase to accommodate 14 million passengers annually. The project will capitalize and build on the Kingdom’s historical position, ultimately transforming it into a vibrant platform that invests in boosting efficiency and reinforcing the role it plays in Bahrain’s gateway to the world.

What the audience will learn

  • AMP main advancements and facilities and digitization at the new passenger terminal building
  • BAC business transformation model
  • New terminal building masterplan
  • Assets integration and stakeholder involvement
  • Operational readiness airport transfer (ORAT)

11:55 - 12:40

Panel Discussion: Airport capacity versus demand management

The panel will discuss the challenges of managing capacity in airspace, airside, landside and in terminal in order to cater for double-digit growth in the Middle East and Asia. The panelists will share their strategies and highlight the use of technology to squeeze more capacity into existing facilities. The topic of airports and sustainability will also be discussed.

What the audience will learn

  • Managing growth in an optimal and sustainable way
  • Balancing capacity across the airport
  • Future-proofing your business
  • Interventions for demand management
David Wilson
Chief operating officer
Oman Airports
Oman
Nicolas Schenk
Chief development officer for Delhi Noida International Airport
Flughafen Zürich AG
Switzerland
Panel Moderators:
Jacques Khoriaty, Middle East & South Asia aviation director, Egis
Ashwini Thorat, Head Airport Planning, GVK

12:40 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

Renaming of taxiways due to major airport expansion

Eileen Tan
Manager
Changi Airport Group (Singapore) Pte Ltd
Singapore
Changi Airport has embarked on a massive five-phase project to rename its taxiways as part of preparation works for Changi East and airport expansion, which includes a third runway. This is the first time that Changi has renamed its taxiways airport-wide since opening 38 years ago. The implementation is challenging as the change has to be carried out amid Changi's busy traffic. Intricate planning with relevant stakeholders has been necessary to minimize disruption to operations and for the changes to be carried out efficiently and safely.

What the audience will learn

  • Key considerations for developing and implementing a new taxiway naming scheme
  • Change management
  • Challenges faced during the implementation stage

14:15

Dubai Airports asset condition survey and investment cost modeling

Lal Mathew
Director, asset reliability and engineering performance
Dubai Airport
United Arab Emirates
Martin Vallance
Business consultancy specialist
Atkins
United Arab Emirates
Dubai Airport, operational since 1960, has a rich history of assets, augmented over many phases in the last 58 years to address capacity demands and modernization. With a capacity of 90 million+ today, Dubai Airport has a large asset base of mixed age and reliability profiles. Preparing for future investments based on well-informed inputs, ensuring optimum timing and maximum benefits, is critical to the continued success of the airport. Join the presentation to learn how a set of ‘asset investment planning decision support capabilities’ were developed to deliver on Dubai Airport's vision for the future.

What the audience will learn

  • How a cost model can help inform a strategic asset investment program
  • How to reduce asset failures and increase safety
  • Improved decision making for renewals and maintenance
  • Best practice and lessons learned from working collaboratively

14:45

Terminal 3 expansion plan at Narita Airport

Yusuke Kato
Senior manager
Narita International Airport Corporation
Japan
Terminal 3 is the dedicated LCC terminal at Narita Airport, which opened in 2015 with a capacity of 7.5 million passengers a year. Steady growth in LCC in Japan caused severe congestion in T3. We decided to expand the terminal to double the capacity and enhance the passenger experience. First, we segregated the departure and arrival flows by extending the terminal to have an arrival lobby. The access walkway from Terminal 2 will be replaced by a wider and safer corridor and the distance between these two terminals will be reduced. Passenger experience will be dramatically improved by introducing a hold baggage screening system, self-bag-drop equipment and smart security.

What the audience will learn

  • How to expand the existing terminal
  • Enhanced passenger experience at LCC terminal
  • Up-to-date information about Narita Airport

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30

New greenfield airports in Indonesia

Ramdan Pradarma
Vice president corporate planning and transformation
PT Angkasa Pura I
Indonesia
Indonesia is the world's biggest archipelago and has the world's fourth-biggest population. It has unique characteristics and environments for building and establishing air transportation: 17,000 islands make air and sea transportation highly desirable, which is why we currently have 268 airports, set to become 310 by 2024. The establishment of new greenfield airports faces many barriers such as regulation and density. Greenfield airports in Indonesia demonstrate art and stakeholder management to boost Indonesia's economy and tourism industry.

What the audience will learn

  • Understanding high-density country issues and how to approach them
  • Multiple-airport strategy and implementation
  • Stakeholder management and intergovernmental relationships
  • Land selection and acquisition

16:00

Clark Airport – a new gateway to the Philippines

Joshua M Bingcang
Senior vice president for conversion and development
Bases Conversion Development Authority (BCDA)
Philippines
Thanos Deriziotis
Project director
Egis
France
The presentation will introduce Clark Airport as a future gateway to the Philippines to serve the development of New Clark City. This project has been driven by the Philippines Bases Conversion Development Agency (BCDA) and is implemented under a hybrid PPP scheme made of an EPC contract on the one hand and an O&M service provider contract on the other. This iconic project is one of the most ambitious in the Philippines, and more generally in the dynamic ASEAN region. The airport will serve a brand-new metropolis, thus providing many opportunities for airport industry stakeholders.

What the audience will learn

  • Brief overview of the airport sector in the Philippines
  • An airport project to serve a brand-new metropolis: status and development of Clark Airport and city
  • Particularities of a hybrid PPP scheme splitting EPC and O&M (lessons learned, pros and cons)
  • Opportunities for the airport industry (manufacturers and service providers)

16:30

Shanghai South Satellite: the world’s largest and most complex concourse

Shanshan Li
Regional manager, corporate real estate, China
Delta Air Lines [via live uplink]
China
Jonathan Massey
Managing principal
Corgan
USA
The PVG South Satellite, which opened at Shanghai Pudong International Airport in September 2019, is the largest and most complex of its kind in the world. This 100-gate, 670,000 square meter concourse provides immense operational flexibility despite its complex passenger flow and segregation requirements. There were unique challenges, including the requirement for swing gates, the need for segregated domestic/international and arriving/departing passenger flows on a common APM platform, and a large number of gates required within an acceptable walking distance. The story will be presented by a key airline stakeholder and the project's design architect.

What the audience will learn

  • The operational complexity of a large concourse serving both long-haul and short-haul segregated traffic
  • Lessons learned on airline engagement during the design phase for a complex operational building
  • The importance of evaluating airline operational scenarios during the design phase, including operational support requirements
  • About dealing with complex design challenges in a new culture and different language
  • How to deal with complex designs issues in an emerging operational environment

17:00

State-of-the-art campus sets a new standard in airline operational excellence

Serap Okcu
Manager, airport investments and transfer planning
Turkish Airlines
Turkey
Joseph Gonzalez, FAIA
Global director of design
Ghafari Associates, LLC
USA
With the development of an all-new airport in Istanbul came the opportunity to plan and design a state-of-the-art operational campus for Turkish Airlines (THY) comprised of over 50 next-generation support facilities. The campus will total over 650,000m2 (7 million square feet) and set a new standard in airline operational excellence. Our design is not only highly functional, but imparts a unified visual identity that thoughtfully applies the airline’s revamped global brand. Attendees will learn how we incorporated innovative technology and sustainable materials to develop a cohesive design representative of THY’s ambitious growth, corporate rebranding efforts and overall vision.

What the audience will learn

  • How to apply key skills to design complex projects like the seven million square feet, 50-building campus for Turkish Airlines
  • Identify and define key elements that are crucial for successful global leadership: management, communication, local-office presence and construction management
  • How the use of technology was critical to building consensus among the disciplines involved in the implementation of the campus
  • Understand the methodology and approach behind our design in terms of branding, application of sustainable materials and use of technology

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS Ceremony & Drinks Reception! Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Aviation Security, Border Control & Facilitation (Continued)

Day 2: Wednesday, June 10

Aviation Security, Border Control & Facilitation
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Dr Jean Salomon
Principal
European Association for Biometrics
France
Neville Hay
Director of training
Interportpolice
UK

Frontiers in border management security – in association with EAB - European Association for Biometrics

09:05

DHS Science and Technology Biometric and Identity Technology Center Research

Arun Vemury
Director, Biometric and Identity Technology Center
US Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate
USA
The DHS Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) Biometric and Identity Technology Center is S&T’s core biometric and identity RDT&E capability to drive enduring efficiencies and biometric innovations across DHS. The technology center’s research focuses on enhancing collection and matching capabilities; data security, privacy and integrity; next-generation identity documents and transactions; and identity linking and correlation.

What the audience will learn

  • Overview of the DHS S&T Biometric and Identity Technology Center
  • Learn about the technology center’s core research thrust areas
  • Identify path forward and opportunities for collaboration with industry and academia

09:35

Are interoperable biometric identities worth their impact on the borders?

Nicolas Goniak
Advisor - IT
Ministry of the Interior
France
In 2015-16 Europe endured a rise in terrorist attacks, some of which took advantage of multiple identities made possible by the diversity of immigration and security databases across Europe. Several regulations under the 'interoperability' banner have been devised since then, and now promise to fill the gaps. Borders will be stronger based on more reliable identities and more thorough checks. For that to happen, border crossing will move from a (simple) ID-and-document check to a whole ID registration. Authorization systems (ETIAS and visa) upstream and more automation in airports will reduce the tasks of the border guard. Will this be sufficient?

What the audience will learn

  • Immigration and security challenges the Schengen zone is facing
  • How far the seven new European regulations fill the gaps in the knowledge about the traveler's identity
  • The big change in the nature of border checks, and their operational impacts

10:05

Making EU border crossings seamless and secure

Pascal Janer
Vice president sales Europe
IN Groupe
France
The presentation will explain how to successfully meet the challenges of identification and biometrics for smooth EU border crossings in a post-Brexit environment, at one of the most important land and sea borders between France and the United Kingdom. Automatic border control e-gates with facial recognition were first implemented in the same way as in the airline industry. The second objective was to deploy the One ID concept applied to vehicles. This was possible thanks to multi-biometric kiosks, an identity management platform, but also to mobile devices to improve queue management and ensure a high level of security.

What the audience will learn

  • Biometrics, automation and facilitation
  • One ID and identity management platform
  • Entry/exit systems
  • Seamless passenger journey
  • Automatic border control with facial recognition

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

The power of identity – leveraging biometric identity services

John Boyd
Assistant director, futures identity
USA Department of Homeland Security - Office of Biometric Identity Management
USA
The Office of Biometric Identity Management (OBIM) provides the US Department of Homeland Security and its mission partners with biometric identity services that enable national security and public safety decision making. This presentation will focus on the role of an enterprise-level service provider of biometric identity services, discussing current customers and multimodal capabilities, and looking at the Homeland Advanced Recognition Technology (HART) currently being developed: its role as a biometric identity services provider, support to the mission partners, leveraging current and future technology.

What the audience will learn

  • Overview of DHS biometric identity services
  • Developing the Homeland Advanced Recognition Technology (HART) Multimodal Biometric System
  • International information sharing
  • Privacy and public perception

11:25 - 11:55

Panel Discussion: Frontiers in biometrics: concerted border clearance challenges and achievements in air transportation

This panel will review the constraints of increasing border-crossing flows versus the challenges in performance, harmonization and respect for the privacy of biometrics as the main security-passing security credential. This will be in line with first observations from current large continent-level entry-exit programs. Our panel will review the importance of biometrics in streamlining border controls, while acknowledging that its rapid performance improvements do parallel a trend toward more sophisticated attacks against travelers' ID integrity. Delegates are welcome to participate in this collective challenge.

What the audience will learn

  • How is this hide-and-seek ID game going to evolve?
  • Will reality ever get close to an ideal world?
  • How sustainable are the present models/tokens (documents, processes, inter-agency/organization agreements)?
  • Do we have the right focus on the digital/technological push to achieve a harmonized blend of biometrics technologies in a generalized privacy-by-design ID scheme?
Arun Vemury
Director, Biometric and Identity Technology Center
US Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate
USA
Nicolas Goniak
Advisor - IT
Ministry of the Interior
France
John Boyd
Assistant director, futures identity
USA Department of Homeland Security - Office of Biometric Identity Management
USA
Pascal Janer
Vice president sales Europe
IN Groupe
France
Panel Moderator:
Jean Salomon, principal, European Association for Biometrics

11:55 - 13:15

Lunch

13:15

Using biometrics to improve efficiency and security

Thiago Meirelles Fernandes Pereira
General coordinator
Brazilian Ministry of Infrastructure
Brazil
Carlos Eduardo Gomes Souza
Coordinator
Brazilian Ministry of Infrastructure
Brazil
Each year the challenges of airport management become more relevant. In many cases, existing infrastructure cannot keep up with the increase in passenger volume. Thus, having good management of available resources is essential, as is the implementation of new technologies and processes to utilize the full potential of available infrastructure. The Brazilian government understands the importance of efficiency to address this issue. It is focused on improving passenger facilitation without compromising security, and is implementing end-to-end biometrics from check-in to boarding the aircraft, developing a large passenger identification and risk analysis system based on biographical and biometric traveler data.

What the audience will learn

  • How to implement biometrics from scratch
  • Increasing processes efficiency to address passenger growth
  • Creating a National Passenger Information Database
  • Security based on risk analysis
  • Improving the passenger experience

13:45

The effect of the introduction of the European Entry-Exit System at airports

Dr Kai Wendler
Senior team leader process and checkpoint management
Fraport AG
Germany
The challenge of EES is how to collect all relevant biometric and personal data of travelers. Border control checks at airports are particularly critical because any prolongation of the actual process might lead to longer waiting times for passengers, with unpleasant situations especially during peak times. The use of self-service kiosks at the airport is one solution; another option seems to be online (APP) and off-airport registrations. There is no perfect solution yet, but it is clear that all relevant stakeholders, authorities, airlines and airports have to find the optimum way to integrate and facilitate the Entry-Exit System.

What the audience will learn

  • Actual/new developments with EES
  • Possible solutions discussed
  • Challenges for airports and operators

14:15

How good is passenger-entered APIS data?

Simon Watkin
Senior official
Home Office
UK
Irra Ariella Khi
Co-founder and chief executive officer
Zamna
UK
Governments are increasingly demanding that passenger API should be accurate, and fining airlines when it is not. Furthermore, the growth of electronic travel authorizations (and e-visas) means that airlines will need to be sure that passengers have the required ETA before they board. This API verification technology has been checking the accuracy of passenger-supplied API provided to several of the world’s leading airlines. This presentation will examine how good that API data is and what kinds of mistakes are being made by passengers and airline staff – and their impact on operations before and after the increase in ETAs.

What the audience will learn

  • Accuracy of passenger API is not good enough – why this matters now for pax experience, airline operations, government relations
  • The most common errors, and whether they are significant for the airline managing this data before passing it on to governments
  • Which groups of passengers make the most mistakes and how airlines can ensure they can correct this and establish validity
  • Which system is reliable for gathering API data (comparison of self-service kiosks, CUTE terminal touchpoints and self-asserted data)
  • How better data is the key to more efficient operations in solving the challenge of government and airline passenger processing

14:45

Identity management at TSA

Jason Lim
Identity management capability manager
Transportation Security Administration
USA
With rising air travel volumes, evolving security threats and operational constraints, TSA must continue to adopt innovative technologies to enhance security and efficiency, while improving the passenger experience. The use of biometrics will modernize traveler identity verification and improve aviation security against the threat from bad actors. This session will cover TSA’s approach to identity management as it relates to physical and digital identities. It will also focus on TSA’s latest plans for biometric technology deployments at TSA checkpoints to provide modern, intuitive self-service solutions that reduce the reliance on manual and paper-based authentication.

What the audience will learn

  • TSA’s Biometrics Roadmap – key highlights and accomplishments since publication in October 2018
  • TSA identity management landscape and future capabilities to be explored
  • Plans to test biometrics and digital identity technology at airport checkpoints
  • TSA and other DHS efforts to enhance the passenger journey from curb to gate or reservation to destination
  • TSA’s engagement with industry and external stakeholders to explore new technology and processes

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30 - 16:30

Panel Discussion: Seamless travel around the world: best practices and lessons learned

Digital identity passenger systems are reshaping and transforming the global travel ecosystem by providing seamless experiences through travel hubs. With single digital identification, passengers are easily recognized by service providers at the departing and arriving airports, thereby eliminating repetitive clearance processes. Ultimately, it will provide a seamless pre-cleared travel experience in nearly every travel scenario. Technologies such as mobile ID, multi-border passenger identification, home-to-home passenger biometric authentication and non-stop, paperless airport clearance are leading this transformation by exploring the full capability and capacity of collaborative stakeholder digital networks for enhanced passenger clearance, flow efficiency, identity security and terminal capacity.

What the audience will learn

  • Establishes industry and government collaboration for a robust and efficient identity management solution across the end-to-end passenger process
  • Enables a collaborative solution connecting all points and stakeholders to deliver a secure and seamless home-to-home journey across multiple airports
  • Biometric tokens are key to trusted digital identity recognition technology and a collaborative identity management platform supporting a trusted framework among stakeholders
  • Sets standards and practices for interoperability harmonization of frameworks, processes, data models and data interchange protocols for aviation and government
  • Digital management platforms use a full paperless journey setting new standards of passenger privacy and control of personal data
Chris Woodroofe
Chief operations officer
Gatwick Airport
UK
Ricardo Cerri
CTO
Corporación América Uruguay
Uruguay
Steve Rowland
Executive director of operations
Terminal 1, JFK International Airport
USA
James McDonald
Program director, Seamless Traveller Journey Initiative
World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC)
UK
Panel Moderator:
Celine Canu, head of aviation facilitation, IATA

16:30

From art to science – human-machine interface to maximize screeners' capabilities

Udi Bechor
EVP business development and innovation
ICTS Europe SA
France
This presentation will discuss recent breakthroughs in x-ray screening. We will showcase the results of pilots at major hub airports, demonstrating how screeners’ analytical capabilities and performance can be maximized by combining human and artificial intelligence on one platform, allowing real-time human-machine interface for faster and more accurate visual recognition. At the trials, screening time was optimized to three images per second, and the POC demonstrated the potential for networked operator screening to achieve a significantly high hit rate. We will present further training capabilities and consider the implications of AI-driven automation on processes, infrastructure and labor.

What the audience will learn

  • How artificial intelligence (AI) driven automation can revolutionize checkpoint security
  • How human-machine interface can overcome the bottleneck of human performance
  • The potential for networked operator screening to increase efficiency and accuracy
  • How to maximize human capabilities to optimize response to emerging threats
  • How to deploy human-machine interface to monitor performance, fatigue and concentration levels in real time

17:00 - 17:30

Panel Discussion: Mobile automation in aviation security

Advancements in autonomous technology have the potential to significantly enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of aviation security. However, the aviation community must think about which systems will provide the biggest benefit and how they can be integrated into ongoing operations. This panel will explore ongoing developments in autonomous technology, operational concerns and lessons learned from use cases to provide potential adopters of autonomous technologies with a better understanding of available capabilities and the best way to move forward.

What the audience will learn

  • Autonomous technology overview: system types, mobile versus stationary systems, multi-system deployments and data collection
  • The right solution: matching autonomous technology and capability with operational need and environment
  • Logistics: adjusting for autonomous vehicles in the operating plan
  • Use cases and lessons learned
Brian Cobb
Chief innovation officer
Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport
USA
Steve Armitage
Head of innovation and intelligent automation
Heathrow Airport
UK
Anne Marie Pellerin
Managing partner
LAM LHA Consulting
France
Panel Moderator:
Donald Zoufal, lecturer / consultant, University of Chicago / CrowZnest Consulting Inc

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS Ceremony & Drinks Reception! Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Commercial Development, Retail, Concessions & Media (Continued)

Day 2: Wednesday, June 10

Commercial Development, Retail, Concessions & Media
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Fundi Sithebe
COO
Airports Company South Africa
South Africa
Jeremy Corfield
Partner
CPI
Australia

09:05

Next-generation retailing at Heathrow

Fraser Brown
Retail director
Heathrow Airport
UK
The presentation will outline how Heathrow sees the future of travel retail and some of the early thinking around how Heathrow is evolving its successful retail model with retailers and brands to ensure it supports the airport's vision of delivering the best airport service in the world and continues to deliver non-aeronautical income for all stakeholders.

What the audience will learn

  • How Heathrow sees the travel retail landscape today – its risks and opportunities
  • Some examples of how Heathrow will evolve its model
  • Some of the issues and risks in the evolution of the model

09:35

Making the ancillary pie bigger

Kam Jandu
Chief commercial officer
Budapest Airport
Hungary
By collaborating with airlines, retailers, brands and technology providers, BUD helped drive incremental sales for all players. This serves as a blueprint for growing ancillary income for all, as opposed to competing with each other for the passengers' wallets.

What the audience will learn

  • How to collaborate
  • Defining KPIs
  • Brainstorming
  • Transparency

10:05

Accelerating growth with a digital retail marketplace

Pete Richards
Head of omnichannel retail
MAGO
UK
Christopher Stone
Retail trading manager
MAGO
UK
This presentation will review the growth of MAGO's digital retail marketplace and the great strides it has made over the past year. With cutting-edge new features, an expanded product range and new payment solutions equipped for the most complex customs regulations, there is a lot of progress to share. The presenters will demonstrate how their marketplace has grown online spend per passenger tenfold in the past 12 months, and how they are developing new ways to capture customer spend before customers travel.

What the audience will learn

  • How MAG-O approached building a digital market-place in-house
  • How the company continues to expand at pace, delivering new features in days not months
  • How new premium brands have been brought on board
  • How MAG-O has delivered a tenfold increase in online spend per passenger year-on-year
  • Exciting new features and developments to look out for soon

10:35 - 11:10

Panel Discussion: Retail innovation at your fingertips

A discussion on airport innovation and retail department collaboration – inspiring retail ideas

What the audience will learn

  • Entrepreneurship and innovation in airport retail
  • New business model in airport retail
  • Reinventing airport retail - retail innovation case studies
  • The future of retail - retail innovation - how to
Fraser Brown
Retail director
Heathrow Airport
UK
Gilles Brentini
Head of strategic innovation and projects
Genève Aéroport
Switzerland
Kam Jandu
Chief commercial officer
Budapest Airport
Hungary
Mats Berglind
Digital innovation manager
Swedavia AB
Sweden
Pete Richards
Head of omnichannel retail
MAGO
UK
Panel Moderators:
Jeremy Corfield, partner, CPI
Fundi Sithebe, COO, Airports Company South Africa

11:10 - 11:30

Break

11:30

Food trends: how to create new food halls in airports

Aude Ferrand
Chief retail officer
Groupe ADP
France
The presentation will discuss 'the new food hall' – or how to be inspired by new food trends and transform the dining experience in airports. Over the past few years, Groupe ADP has enriched its commercial development strategy to create a unique dining atmosphere for all passengers departing from Paris airports. The main challenge is to always guarantee the right balance in terms of brands and their diversity, the true storytelling and the unique experience to clients, but also ensure passengers have a glimpse of the Parisian atmosphere but with diversity. From the first successful step of this strategy implemented in Terminal 2F at Paris-Charles de Gaulle Airport two years ago to the next main project planned at Paris-Orly Airport for 2022, ADP is working with operators and brands to create a new vision of F&B across all terminals. This presentation will be an opportunity to discover the three new projects at Paris-CDG and Paris-Orly.

What the audience will learn

  • Ensure diversity in the F&B offering
  • Transform the dining journey and experience
  • Leverage the food trends and adapt to airport constraints

12:00

Curating a unique customer experience

Sean Warren
Director - non-traditional real estate
Chick-fil-A Inc
USA
What goes into creating a unique customer experience? It’s not just one thing, it’s a lot of little things – and a few big things. It all adds up and comes together to create a unique guest experience. We care about each and every individual that we serve. Furthermore, we hope that we can inspire people to take good care of each other. We believe that’s the secret to creating an experience for guests that is so compelling that people come back again and again.

What the audience will learn

  • Four things that are critical to creating a remarkable guest experience: people, food, hospitality and speed
  • Caring about each and every individual is the secret ingredient to a remarkable guest experience
  • Innovation is key and everything can be improved

12:30

Collaborating with Airport Concessions Disadvantaged Business Enterprises partners

Ron Gomes
Vice president of strategic alliances
HMSHost
USA
North American airports are increasingly turning to concessions as a way to deliver a strongly differentiated offer to passengers and non-aeronautical revenue. This session takes a look at the shape of the Airport Concessions Disadvantaged Business Enterprises program today. It will also outline the importance of developing collaborative partnerships with concessionaires, local entrepreneurial brands and small businesses, and how that leads to delivering diverse, high-performance programs tailored for each airport’s passenger needs.

What the audience will learn

  • The importance of cultivating lasting, viable partnerships with diverse businesses at your airports
  • How to seek out the right partners in design and construction, concession operations, supply chain and related services
  • How to build ‘true,’ win-win working relationships

13:00 - 14:15

Lunch

14:15

What can airports learn from global best sustainable retail design?

James Berry
Director
Woods Bagot
USA
With an increasingly competitive airport landscape, retail and hospitality are key differentiators in defining the guest experience. A case study of one of the most recent innovative retail mall and mixed-use designs in Singapore will explore the key principles in inspiring customers and how this compares to the most recent airport retail. Focusing on the guest experience, well-being and wellness, it will examine how sustainability is an essential part of catering to the needs of travelers and what airports can learn from successful commercial retail design.

What the audience will learn

  • A case study of Funan Mall, Singapore – a benchmark in sustainable retail design
  • What is meant by sustainability, well-being and wellness
  • How sustainability and biophilia are the key to successful commercial retail design

14:45

Developing a new airport retail concept for Jewel Changi Airport

David Coyne
Executive director
Benoy
UK
Our retail vision for Jewel Changi was to create a unique shopping and dining experience, accessible to all while not restricted by the flying process. The retail/F&B is pre-security and accessible to local Singaporeans and travelers alike. Offering some 280 units, 25% of which are flagship stores or unique to Singapore, it links seamlessly with the on-site hotel and leisure facilities. Airline check-in and lounges are included in the retail layout. Natural light, spacious shopping streets and tiered landscaping all combine to create something truly unique and unlike any other existing airport retail experience.

What the audience will learn

  • Airports can be destinations in their own right
  • The future airport is more than just catching a plane
  • Landside developments can increase footfall

15:15

Airport terminals – tomorrow's department stores?

Peter Farmer
Transportation director
Chapman Taylor
UK
Airport terminals need to encourage increased dwell and patronage by offering a private members club experience, in the manner of a successful airline lounge, but to everyone. In doing so, revenue will flow. Harry Selfridge said his store shouldn't be seen simply as a shop, but also as a social and cultural center where people could commune, relax, browse and enjoy the experience. We will explore how airports and terminals need to be relevant, customer-centered brands – particularly how airport branding will be more like curating a resort, creating a positive and memorable passenger experience.

What the audience will learn

  • How current social trends are likely to influence terminal design
  • Current retail trends
  • How airport terminals may change to maintain commercial viability
  • Retail lessons from the past and wider sector and how they may influence future design
  • Ideas that we are currently exploring for stronger engagement between airport brand and passenger

15:45 - 16:00

Break

16:00

The commercial revolution – how dynamic pricing unlocks additional revenues

Simon Deplitch
Chief commercial officer
MAGO
UK
This presentation tells the story of MAGO’s evolution from simple, static, turn-up pricing to advanced, dynamic pre-booked pricing, and the subsequent financial and operational benefits. This involves the application of advanced analytics, augmented by machine learning at MAGO's client airports, to present optimal price points that stimulate demand and optimize price where appropriate. The revenue manager's knowledge and experience are overlaid to optimize overall strategy, not only to maximize revenue but also to reduce operational expenditure to increase profit. This unique, combined approach has resulted in significant growth levels across car parking, lounges, fast-track and ancillary products.

What the audience will learn

  • The key role of data, analytics, visualization and insight in supporting a revenue management strategy
  • How revenue can still be increased despite declining car park capacity
  • The ideal mix of automation and revenue manager interaction
  • How this strategy has worked for a MAG-O client airport – a case study
  • The importance of a multi-disciplinary approach across booking engine developers, data science, revenue managers and operational teams

16:30

Rethinking airport parking in the age of EVs and AVs

Dr Mark Friesen
Managing partner
Quinta Consulting
Germany
Parking has always been an important commercial revenue source for international airports. However, the car parking business at airports has come under pressure in recent years with the rise not only of digital and technological innovations but also dramatic changes in market dynamics and customer behavior. This presentation will address the main forces, illustrating what airport parking looks like today and explaining how disruptive trends like AVs, EVs and TNCs will shape airport parking in the future.

What the audience will learn

  • How airport parking should look today (best practice of approx. 25 projects)
  • How to commercially, digitally and operationally optimize airport parking today and in the future
  • How disruptive trends like AVs, EVs and TNCs will shape airport parking in the future

17:00

Key e-commerce trends shaping airport parking

Neil Corr
Senior account executive
IDeaS - a SAS company
UK
Airport parking managers must plan for the future in a rapidly changing environment. Airports are predicting unprecedented growth and making significant investments in their infrastructure, funded in large part by a parking revenue stream that is facing increased competitive pressure. To remain competitive, selling parking reservations online has become the new standard. Advancements in technology have also given airports access to an unprecedented amount of data. Learn about the tools they are using to optimize limited or excess demand across parking facilities. Hear about demand-based, dynamic pricing tools and marketing and distribution strategies that make e-commerce success a promising reality.

What the audience will learn

  • Understand data and analytics tools that can be used to optimize capacity and maximize revenue
  • Analyze and evaluate opportunities to implement a revenue management strategy
  • Compare airport experiences before and after the technology was utilized

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS Ceremony & Drinks Reception! Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Customer Service & Passenger Experience (Continued)

Day 2: Wednesday, June 10

Customer Service & Passenger Experience
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Sujata Suri
Vice president – strategy and development
Hamad International Airport
Qatar
Brian Engle
Director of customer experience
Greater Orlando Aviation Authority
USA

09:05

Motivation, inspiration, innovation – engaging all our people makes the difference

Anna Maria Francinelli
Benchmarking service quality manager
SEA Milan Airports
Italy
The presentation will show how SEA engages all its people and collaborates with all its stakeholders, both in times of disruptions and contingency in order to face emergency situations (for example, the so-called BRIDGE due to the closure of Linate Airport and the movement of all the traffic to Malpensa Airport from July 27 to October 26, 2019. It will also explain how SEA involves its staff cross-functionally for the deployment and improvement of all the services in the medium and long terms, looking for innovative solutions in line with the best technology.

What the audience will learn

  • Real examples of staff engagement starting from the great motivation, inspiration and communication coming from the top management
  • The commitment, passion, endurance, creativity, capability and courage of our staff to transform, renovate and change direction
  • We are developing our airports through a holistic approach to deliver excellent services, promoting sustainable initiatives for stakeholders' benefits

09:35

Customer service on the fly!

Beau Vanderford
Station manager
Copa Airlines
USA
This presentation will cover lessons learned from improv. Improvisation is an art, and so is customer service! By embracing the skills learned from the art of improv, the same tools can be used to deliver outstanding customer service and create signature experiences for customers.

What the audience will learn

  • Courageousness vs fearlessness
  • Never say 'no' again
  • To be comfortable with the uncomfortable
  • To fail your way to success

10:05

Employees and customers, the two sides of the same experience

Dimitri Coll
Director ASQ customer experience
ACI World
Canada
Employee experience and customer experience are closely linked together and are now two of the driving forces of airport business. When managed together they create a unique competitive advantage and lead to better efficiency and profitability and a more sustainable future. This session will describe the similarity between customer and employee experience and stress the importance of managing them both holistically.

What the audience will learn

  • What is employee experience
  • What drives customer satisfaction in an airport
  • Employee journey vs customer journey
  • The airport customer experience model

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55 - 11:55

Panel Discussion: Innovative placemaking: how cross-industry design practices can elevate passenger experience

The future airport will evolve around elevating the passenger experience and meeting the needs of the next-generation traveler. Address the basics, reduce stress and manage expectations but also provide an opportunity for passengers to interact with the local culture of the city they are traveling to/from even while at the airport. How can alternative design practices such as urban planning, tourism and entertainment, sport and event design re-energize public spaces in response to evolving consumer demand for authentic, engaging travel experiences? What can we learn from industries that bring millions of people together, delivering exciting experiences unique to their communities?

What the audience will learn

  • How to respond to the critical need for innovative new thinking to solve complex problems related to customer experience
  • How to organize the chaos and improve passenger experience. How to communicate critical messages and reduce visual clutter
  • How to mitigate the typical stress of the airport environment and construction impacts that create negative customer feedback
  • How to reimagine underutilized spaces to create positive experiences for customers that serve both as a feature and a distraction
  • How applying urban design practices to public spaces can create meaningful connections between people and place while stimulating economic growth
Regina Czerr
Wayfinding and signage manager
Charlotte Douglas International Airport
USA
Lauri Golden
Customer engagement manager
Charlotte Douglas International Airport
USA
Jemma Radick
Senior experiential designer
Populous
USA
Panel Moderator:
Dennis Iskra, senior airport architect, Charlotte Douglas International Airport

11:55 - 13:15

Lunch

13:15

Managing the passenger experience during mega-events

Simone Mendonça
Land side and customer service manager
Antonio Carlos Jobim Airport - RIOgaleão
Brazil
Improving the passenger experience is our daily goal. RIOgaleão Airport has won several awards for the quality of service provided to its users. But how to maintain the same quality of service during the realization of mega-events, which can double the number of passengers for a defined period of time? After experiencing several events with these characteristics – including the Olympic Games – RIOgaleão has developed expertise in these situations and has been an example in Brazil of how to operate during these periods with the same level of service.

What the audience will learn

  • How to prepare for mega-events
  • The challenges and solutions
  • How to engage the team
  • Coordination with authorities
  • Lessons learned

13:45

The arrival passengers: equally as important as the departing passengers

Rafael Alberto Smith
Director operations landside and cargo
Punta Cana International Airport
Dominican Republic
Sevda Fevzi
Manager, ASQ business development and customer care
ACI World
Canada
When a passenger visits a city for the first time, the arrivals experience at their destination airport is their first experience of that particular airport. How can their arrivals experience influence their return, departing experience, and increase or even decrease dwell time? Are satisfied passengers more likely to be revenue spending on their departing journey? Are there any specific groups of passengers particularly influenced or less satisfied with the arrivals experience at an airport?

What the audience will learn

  • Why arriving passengers are important
  • Case studies of airports that provide a great arrivals experience
  • Key findings from ASQ Arrivals program
  • Can the arriving passenger be surveyed?
  • Are there any specific groups of passengers particularly influenced or less satisfied with the arrivals experience at an airport?

14:15

Addressing multiple strategic objectives with innovation – a regional example

Yassin Saddiki
Commercial manager
Rotterdam The Hague Airport
Netherlands
Airports face many challenges at once, involving many different stakeholders, while trying to maintain long-term strategic goals. Although this is likely true for airports of all sizes, perhaps smaller and regional airports feel a relatively bigger need to balance their operations with financial and economic targets, sustainability goals and creating distinct experiences for passengers, while establishing and cultivating a regional support base. Rotterdam The Hague Airport proactively pushes innovation as a comprehensive strategy to address all these various challenges and interests simultaneously. The presentation will include a recent example that will serve to explain and elaborate on RTHA’s philosophy.

What the audience will learn

  • How airports can anchor themselves and their relevance regionally in other ways than transportation
  • Innovation as a branding tool
  • Increasing non-aviation revenue while meeting sustainability goals

14:45

Lessons aviation can learn from the hospitality industry

Mazhar Butt
Group director of guest experience development
Value Retail
UK
Airports and airlines have (finally) woken up to the importance of customer experience – arguably today’s battleground for every industry. In today’s competitive environments, standing still is akin to moving backward when it comes to customer experience. Gone is the era of 'only the strong survive' and now is the dawn of 'those who evolve will survive'. So where best to understand best practices for customer experience than the hospitality industry? In this presentation, the speaker will share some of the key elements that elevate the customer experience in the hospitality and luxury retail industries, driving loyalty and ultimately revenues, challenging decision makers in airports and airlines to make the change.

What the audience will learn

  • Customer experience excellence
  • Principles of hospitality and best practice in customer experience
  • Creativity and innovation in delivering customer experience
  • Staff engagement to engage customers
  • Service recovery

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30

Preparing for the global generational shift: challenges and insights

Ross Gilpin
Accessibility and PRM contracts manager
Edinburgh Airport
UK
Christina Apatow
CEO
FetchyFox
USA
Today, the fastest-growing segment in the travel industry is accessibility; by 2050, the number of travelers over the age of 65 will double. Although this creates some challenges that airports need to prioritize, it also opens a unique market of opportunity. In this talk, we will examine what the data is telling us about the shift in passenger needs over the next decade, look at examples from around the world of how airports and governments are working to prepare for this transition, and discuss measurable goals to ensure your airport or airline is on track to accommodate the Silver Tsunami.

What the audience will learn

  • How to set measurable goals to prepare for this shift in passenger needs
  • The key areas to focus investments for maximum ROI
  • Examples of what airports around the world are doing, what's working and not working
  • The severity of the situation facing the travel industry

16:00

Designing for dementia in airports

Joshua Jones
Architect
Weston Williamson + Partners
UK
The presentation will offer a technological but humanized perspective on how airports can respond spatially to the demands of an aging population and in particular to passengers with dementia. It will explore beyond how education can change perception and training can influence conduct, to how the built environment can provide an inclusive design solution. This will lead to increased accessibility and confidence for independent air travel in an otherwise challenging environment. The session will conclude with an architectural design study, exploring how people-centered design can solve tangible problems, creating a modular sensory space that responds to the needs of inherent flexibility while recognizing that space is at a premium in airports today.

What the audience will learn

  • Dementia-friendly technology in airports
  • How sensory room technology could change the way airports operate, responding to the demands of an aging population
  • How modular systems can be adapted to existing space already available
  • How the technology can dramatically change the end-to-end passenger experience, increasing accessibility to air travel
  • How the technology can give airports an edge, resulting in enhanced customer demand and economic benefits from the ‘gray pound'

16:30

Promoting the universal design of Narita Airport

Kosuke Yamada
Assistant manager
Narita International Airport Corporation
Japan
In preparation for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games, Narita Airport is strongly promoting universal design. It has had to consider not only wheelchair users, visually impaired persons and hearing impaired persons, but also people with intellectual disabilities and those with developmental disabilities. Narita Airport in Japan, the country with the fastest-aging population in the world, has developed a scheme for consulting with persons with disabilities at high density, has undertaken appropriate planning and has begun work on things that it previously had not been working on.

What the audience will learn

  • To develop a scheme to consult with persons with disabilities at high density
  • What to do for invisible disabilities
  • The principles of universal design

17:00

Airport UX simulation system for people with special needs

Paul Hodgen
General manager
Launceston Airport
Australia
Karl Traeger
Principal – aviation leader
Architectus
Australia
The Airport UX simulation project (A-UX) is a fully interactive, multi-player desktop and virtual reality system that can be adapted to any airport. A-UX is designed to support people with disabilities and special needs, allowing them to manage their anxiety levels through simulating the processes of using the airport prior to travel. A-UX also provides a training tool for airport staff to empathize with travelers with special needs. Staff experience the facilities they manage through the eyes of people with a variety of disabilities or special needs, improving the passenger journey experience and efficiencies in throughput.

What the audience will learn

  • The process and software used with students from the Academy of Interactive Entertainment to generate A-UX
  • How A-UX was tuned with disabilities service providers and the people they support to simulate the experience of different disabilities
  • The testing and preliminary implementation outcomes at Australian airports
  • How the simulation is connected to the Architectus architectural design models and Aviation Functional Assessment and Capacity Tool (FACT)

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS Ceremony & Drinks Reception! Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Environment & Sustainability (Continued)

Day 2: Wednesday, June 10

Environment & Sustainability
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Emanuel Fleuti
Head of environment
Flughafen Zürich AG
Switzerland
Dr Mary Kerins
Head of health, safety, sustainability and environment
DAA
Ireland

09:05

LEED for Communities certification at the world's most efficient airport

Jeff Denno
Senior project manager, sustainability
Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport
USA
Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL), the world’s busiest and most efficient airport, is the first airport in the world to be awarded LEED for Communities certification. LEED for Communities is a dynamic performance-scoring platform that helps set the framework for broader sustainability strategies that maximize resource efficiencies. This presentation will explore how this platform has supported the planning efforts and operational decision making at ATL; and where the intersection of these data sets can drive positive, people-focused, economic growth to prepare for the rapidly changing landscape of the aviation industry.

What the audience will learn

  • An understanding of the framework of LEED for Communities within the context of an airport
  • Participants will have the tools to create a roadmap to LEED for Communities certification within a multifaceted entity
  • How to use the platform as a mechanism to develop, support and capture the successes of sustainability programming and policies

09:35

Green airport certificates: a proposal for Alaçatı Airport

Figen Celik
Architect
Ministry of Transport and Infrastructure, Turkey
Turkey
The aviation sector is an important component of global development in every regard. Considering the support the industry provides for tourism, trades, services, marketing and foreign investment, its salience among modes of transportation is apparent. Although the sector ensures socio-economic benefits, its impact on the environment also warrants discussion. The aviation sector has begun to attach importance to green building certification to improve its reputation. Turkey has also acted and obtained a LEED certificate for İzmir Adnan Menderes Airport. Suggestions were developed for Alaçatı Airport in light of the lessons learned from this application.

What the audience will learn

  • To show the design of an airport terminal is an important part of sustainability
  • Design can reduce energy needs
  • The contribution of the design should not be overlooked when dealing with carbon emissions and noise problems

10:05

How to achieve LEED Gold for Lelystad airport

Anke Matijssen
Head of airports department
Deerns
Netherlands
Lelystad Airport was selected to accommodate the increasing origin and destination traffic at Schiphol Airport. Lelystad Airport aspires to be recognized as an international showcase of a functional airport that is convenient for its passengers, maintaining strong links with the region, and an example of sustainability. The design team demonstrated the airport's level of sustainability by stating that it could be certified LEED Gold without additional measures. Lelystad Airport seized this opportunity, resulting in the airport being the first European passenger terminal with this certificate on its door. The presentation shows the design and the process to achieve LEED Gold certification.

What the audience will learn

  • How to achieve LEED Gold certification
  • Sustainability is not only for high budgets
  • Cooperation between design team and contractor lead to the best results
  • Sustainability as a passenger experience

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

Regional airports' net zero CO2 emissions by 2050 commitment

David Ciceo
CEO
Cluj International Airport
Romania
Almost 200 airports from 24 European countries have commited to net zero carbon emissions by 2050, as part of an ACI Europe initiative. The importance of net zero carbon emissions by 2050 has the same importance for small, regional or big airports, but the challenges are different. The main challenges for regional airports are political support and public awareness, financing, increased costs, limited power to deal with customers and stakeholders, and competition. Commitment at all levels is mandatory to obtain the expected results. Cluj International Airport, a Romanian regional airport, shares its plan to reach this goal.

What the audience will learn

  • The importance of the net zero commitment for airports
  • Challenges for regional airports
  • Dealing with customers and stakeholders for agreeing the net zero CO2 commitment
  • The role of competition
  • Cluj International Airport’s commitment to net zero emissions

11:25

Relevance-based climate mitigation options at Zurich Airport

Emanuel Fleuti
Head of environment
Flughafen Zürich AG
Switzerland
Airports and industry partners are all working towards reducing the aviation carbon footprint. But often, the action taken is not the most effective way forward. This presentation gives insight into the carbon footprint of the entire airport, some approaches to assess it, and sources and responsibilities. It additionally discusses how to single out and address emission sources and offers mitigation options to reduce them.

What the audience will learn

  • The range of emission sources within an airport system
  • Methods and tools to assess emission sources
  • A relevance-based approach to mitigation

11:55 - 13:15

Lunch

13:15

How can we make sustainable aviation a reality?

Prof Max Hirsh
Professor
University of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
This talk investigates the concrete steps that we need to take to decarbonize the aviation industry. It focuses on three key topics: how to build better aircraft, how to build better airports and how to build better airport areas. In so doing, it provides a comprehensive overview of the opportunities to drive sustainability through innovations in technology, design and behavior. It also discusses the regulatory and financial barriers that need to be overcome. Finally, it illuminates how airports and airlines can educate the public, engage policymakers and innovate their business models to achieve the goal of decarbonization.

What the audience will learn

  • Key opportunities for decarbonizing the aviation industry
  • How airports can make decarbonization a source of revenue
  • How policymakers can direct strategic investments toward SAJFs and electric aviation
  • How airports can innovate their business models to engage with the challenges of decarbonization

13:45

Carbon, climate and community resiliency

Elizabeth Leavitt
Senior director - engineering, environment and sustainability
Port of Seattle
USA
The presentation will review the key strategic areas the Port of Seattle is advancing to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, improve climate resiliency and return economic benefits to near-port communities. The talk will focus on the work the Port of Seattle and Sea-Tac International Airport are doing to meet ambitious GHG reduction goals, as well as the way we determine which strategies to pursue. In addition, it will explore the emerging work we are doing on resiliency.

What the audience will learn

  • Effective GHG reduction strategies
  • Preparing for climate change
  • Working with near-port communities

14:15

Building climate change resilience for Changi Airport

Gerald Ng
Director - environment and sustainability
Changi Airport Group (Singapore) Pte Ltd
Singapore
Liping Cheng
Senior manager, masterplanning
Changi Airport Group (Singapore) Pte Ltd
Singapore
As climate change and its effects become increasingly apparent, it is timely to assess its impact on aviation by identifying the climate-induced risks and vulnerabilities to airport infrastructure and operations, and incorporate the identified risks and vulnerabilities into existing airport programs and processes. Adaptive management – a systematic approach to managing uncertainty, promoting flexible decision making as information evolves – offers Changi Airport a means to achieve integration, especially considering climate projection uncertainty, limited available funding and the fact that timeframes for climate-induced risks are projected far into the future (i.e. 2050 to 2100). This will help to ensure Changi Airport’s sustainable growth.

What the audience will learn

  • To learn from each other's successes and challenges
  • The various climate risk factors for Changi Airport
  • The mitigating measures for the identified climate risk

14:45

Remaking the airport planning and environmental interface

Patrick Magnotta
Assistant manager, airport planning and environment
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
USA
The airport industry continually refines the intersection of airport planning and environmental impact analysis. Should these distinct yet complimentary processes run concurrently? Sequentially? Or something in-between? Recent laws and executive orders in the USA have prompted nationwide reviews of the intersection of these two processes, with the aim of making the environmental review process more efficient and accountable. In this session, we will discuss these changes, and draw parallels between one country's recent experience and the global, thematic challenges environmental practitioners face when conducting environmental impact analyses for proposed airport development.

What the audience will learn

  • Changes in U.S. environmental impact analysis procedures
  • How these changes are prompting reviews of the planning/environmental interface
  • How examining these complimentary processes can improve development outcomes

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30

Airport accessibility: the 'don't worry, be happy' strategy

Marcel van Beek
Innovation manager/program manager
Amsterdam Airport Schiphol
Netherlands
The presentation will discuss a program to motivate 10,000 employees to travel to and from the airport on their e-bikes or regular bicycles. This involves investment to upgrade the existing cycling infrastructure, bike lockers, dressing rooms, and charge stations, and provision of comfortable clothing for every type of weather. It will result in reduced traffic congestion and increased vitality of personnel. Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, with its international partners, is investing in this program, which is known as 'goinGDutch'. With its package of measures for bicycle commuters, Schiphol Airport predicts that the total number of daily bicycle commuters will be 10,000, resulting in a reduction in employee cars at the airport of more than 3,000 per day by 2024.

What the audience will learn

  • Partnership & co-creation for innovation
  • Sustainability facts and figures for mobility solutions
  • A new point of view on accessibility goals
  • Bicycle solutions for longer travel distances to connect the airport

16:00

Challenging 76,000 colleagues to adopt smarter, healthier, greener commuting habits

Nicola Jones
Colleague travel strategy lead
Heathrow Airport
UK
Matthew Ede
Strategy partner
ICF Next
UK
London Heathrow Airport’s expansion program is dependent on the achievement of a number of targets set out in the UK Government’s Airports National Policy Statement. One of these targets is a 25% reduction in colleague car trips by 2030 and a 50% reduction by 2040. At the heart of hitting these targets will be successful employee engagement. Our vision is to create a seismic shift in commuting behavior, eradicating single-occupancy car journeys and encouraging greater use of public transport, by creating a data-led campaign that demystifies, educates and inspires the 76,000 staff working at Heathrow Airport across over 400 organizations.

What the audience will learn

  • How this sits within Heathrow’s broader 2.0 sustainability plan
  • Why growth of a major airport is not predicated on more car travel to the airport
  • How to change behavior through a focus on the benefits and the positive nature of making a different choice
  • The art of giving the right message to the right people in the right way at the right time
  • Which above-, through- and below-the-line channels were employed in this successful marcomms campaign

16:30

How to become a sustainable airport

Vincenzo Giordano
Deputy director B2T sustainability solutions
Engie Impact
Belgium
Like cities and industries, airports are facing huge challenges to decarbonize their activities and become more sustainable. The focus will be on innovative methodologies, new digital tools and optimal investment strategies recently developed and applied to several airports. The presentation will provide four different use cases from Europe and North America with key outcomes and benefits. We will address four sustainability challenges in particular: mobility (air and land sides), energy (clean on-site generation, energy storage, hydrogen, microgrid, PPAs, alternative fuels for aircraft), resiliency (power reliability thanks to energy storage) and circular economy (resources footprint to leverage the circular potential).

What the audience will learn

  • How to optimize and accelerate the transformation to clean mobility
  • How to identify the best investment strategy to meet all the energy needs of your airport
  • Pathways for energy resilience and climate financing solutions
  • How to visualize material flows and select the most effective circular economy projects (Sankey diagrams)

17:00

Circular economy: a 10Rs approach for airports in developing countries

Ana Claudia Cruz Henriques da Silva
Senior researcher, Department of Transportation Engineering
Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ)
Brazil
This presentation will go beyond the common CE concepts and will use the 10Rs approach outlined by Reike, Vermeulen & Witjes in 2018 (Refuse, Reduce, Resell/Reuse, Repair, Refurbish, Remanufacture, Repurpose/Rethink, Recycle, Recover, Re-mine) as a basis to focus on how airports in developing countries may turn CE concepts and theories into actions, strategies and policies to reposition themselves amid an ever-growing number of passengers, companions, visitors and working personnel, plus the continuous pressure to maximize aviation and commercial revenues, while being 'ecofriendly' and environmentally sustainable in all possible matters.

What the audience will learn

  • Circular economy concepts and theories
  • Circular economy actions, strategies and policies: the 10Rs approach
  • 'Ecofriendly' airports and environment sustainability
  • CE 10Rs for airports in developing countries

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS Ceremony & Drinks Reception! Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Management & Operations (Continued)

Day 2: Wednesday, June 10

Management & Operations
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Etienne van Zuijlen
Lead business development - airport operations
SITA
Netherlands
Velissarios Eleftheriou
CEO
TotalCDM
Greece

09:05

'Smart flow' – balancing arrivals and departures with airport needs

Dr Gotthard Boerger
Director products and strategy
Harris Orthogon GmbH
Germany
In line with the ATM masterplan trajectory, moving from first-come, first-served, to best planned-best served will be a crucial operating concept shift for airports within the next few years. Airports have been busy playing their part, harnessing the ground operational flows from aircraft stand to runway, giving the network a much-enhanced picture of what flight will take off, when. Now, using smart, predictive technology to create a full digital twin of the airspace operations, for the first time we can join together the air and the ground operation to enable optimized predictive balancing of the airport's critical finite ground infrastructure from the outside, in.

What the audience will learn

  • Lost in acronyms? ACDM, DMAN, AMAN, DCB... we’ll show you how they all join together to deliver the future
  • How predicting the next operational day from the lenses of ‘flight’ will allow enhanced resource management, mitigating cost and delays
  • Proven concepts already rolled out at major hub airports
  • New methods to deal with uncertainty in an uncertain environment
  • Dispel the myth that airports, ANSPs and airlines all want different things

09:35

Bridge 27.07/27.10.2019 – transfer of operations from Linate to Malpensa Airport

Alessandro Fidato
Chief operating officer
SEA Milan Airports
Italy
Closing Linate Airport for three months was necessary in order to carry out extraordinary maintenance works to flight infrastructures as well as to upgrade the BHS system and refurbish the passenger terminal. A great effort in planning, organizing and logistics management was put in place to transfer the commercial and general aviation air traffic to Malpensa Airport in terms of infrastructure enhancement, transferring staff, vehicles and equipment. A new scenario for managing operations was applied in accordance with the ATC provider and the local authority to handle a +30% in A/C movements in one shot. Closing for three months and having to transfer most of the flights to Malpensa was not only extremely challenging for the Milan airport system but also potentially disruptive for passengers and airlines. The outcome was somewhat surprising.

What the audience will learn

  • Planning, organizing and logistics management method (infrastructure, resources and operations)
  • Teamwork, motivation of human resources and stress management
  • Profitable cooperation with authorities and institutions for the punctual coordination of operations
  • Safety risk assessment and noise increase mitigation procedures
  • How a potentially disruptive event may produce positive outcomes

10:05

RIOgaleão's planning and performance for temporary closure of the adjacent airport

Juliana Gonçalves da Silva Ferreira
Airport planner
RIOgaleão Airport
Brazil
Beatriz Lagnier Gil Ferreira
Airport planner
RIOgaleão Airport
Brazil
Rio de Janeiro has two major airports: Galeão - Rio de Janeiro International Airport (GIG) and Santos Dumont (SDU). In September 2019, SDU closed its main runway for refurbishment for 30 days and 90% of SDU flights were transferred to GIG, contributing to a 110% increase in domestic traffic overnight. The confirmation of the SDU closure came only 40 days prior and GIG had to rapidly plan several interventions to withstand the additional demand. This presentation will show GIG’s action plan to maximize airport throughput and ensure passenger experience, and the main issues and successes regarding operational performance.

What the audience will learn

  • The main difficulties, challenges and opportunities faced with a sudden increase in demand
  • Operational bottlenecks identified, from the simplest (credentials of extra airline employees) to the most difficult (how to improve curbside capacity)
  • Temporary interventions conceived and implemented to enhance airport throughput

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

ORAT – connecting the dots at micro, mezzo and macro levels

Mo Ashmawy
Aviation manager, project controls
AECOM
United Arab Emirates
Connecting the dots with ORAT means seeing the bigger picture so as to raise the confidence level for a smooth transition from construction to operation from day one, with innovation in every aspect of what you do. Being ready for operation depends on the ability to seamlessly navigate and combine all levels (micro, mezzo and macro) to deliver successful outcomes for clients and communities. The ORAT governance models and the confidence we provide to new or revamped facilities are all about how many dots to connect.

What the audience will learn

  • Understanding the complexity of the airports business – operational and process. Where each level exhibits a high degree of entropy
  • OART doesn't just help individuals; it works across three scales – micro, mezzo and macro – to deliver the change
  • The micro level is everyday work and involves direct interaction between facilities and systems, delivering a process up to efficiency
  • Mezzo level is generally considered the point when the asset is ready to provide returns at the level expected for the investment
  • The macro level establishes the principles and terminology of business continuity management, which involves interventions and advocacy on a large scale

11:25

Digital transformation – the importance of people

Ryan Marzullo
Managing director - design and construction - New York City Airports
Delta Air Lines
USA
Jane Goslett
Associate principal/regional ORAT lead
Arup
USA
In today’s rapidly transforming world, business leaders across industry have come to recognize that their continued success depends on their ability to evolve with the times. Until recently, they have focused primarily on effectively leveraging the power of new technologies to improve operations. But airports are increasingly recognizing that they face challenges that go well beyond technology when implementing major programs; they rely on a sophisticated ecosystem of people and systems to deliver a critical service.

What the audience will learn

  • Complexities of phased construction programs
  • Systems integration – data analytics and predictability; fault detection to improve operational performance
  • The importance of a defined concept of operations to support the development of the basis of design
  • Not to underestimate the technical training component (supplier-provided training) – logistics and complexities
  • Importance of planning for ORAT – people readiness – training and familiarization and trials

11:55 - 12:40

Panel Discussion: Simplify and accelerate ORAT execution for your capital improvement program

As airport systems and technology have increased in complexity, so has the job of carrying out airport operational readiness (ORAT). Even though ORAT can be complex and daunting, not executing it well puts airports at risk of experiencing opening-day failures. In this session you'll hear from airport executives and operational readiness practitioners about how they have been able to simplify and accelerate the execution of their ORAT programs. Come and learn real takeaways that you can implement right away to better position your airport projects for success.

What the audience will learn

  • How to structure your AOR/ORAT team for success
  • How to organize stakeholder working groups for maximum participation and coordination
  • How to effectively use technology to plan, execute and monitor your AOR/ORAT program
  • How to phase your AOR/ORAT program for maximum benefit
  • How to ensure engagement and collaboration from start to finish
Ken Warren
Capital program leader
Port of Seattle
USA
Melvin Price
Associate director, ORAT
LeighFisher
USA
Ortez Gude
CEO
Citiri Inc
USA
Panel Moderator:
Robert Gilbert, strategic advisor, Los Angeles World Airports

12:40 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

Digitalization journey of 'The Americas' hub

Claudio Dutary
General manager operations department
Tocumen International Airport
Panama
Hector Manubens
Business development director
Ikusi
Spain
The presentation will discuss the transformation of Tocumen International airport data into business intelligence to improve and optimize airport processes, under a total airport management concept, allowing better operational management, coordination, control and monitoring of the services provided by the AOCC. The challenge was on managers, operators and airport planners to obtain information in a simplified, orderly and simple way about the status of the KPIs of the airport processes, to allow them to better understand the reality of the airport and, consequently, make the best decisions.

What the audience will learn

  • The digitalization process
  • The resulting digital model
  • Why airport digitalization is important
  • Airports' needs and challenges
  • The total airport management framework

14:15

APOC: it’s all about improvement

Korijn Defever
Operational improvement manager
Brussels Airport Company
Belgium
Setting up an APOC is one thing; how to move this setup to a truly proactive, collaborative decision-making environment based on data and insights is another. Trust and iteration is the way to grow the maturity of your APOC together with your stakeholders and ensure operational excellence. This presentation outlines a step-by-step program with a three-fold positive impact: true collaborative decision making, transparent data exchange and a focus on performance.

What the audience will learn

  • Continuous improvement in an APOC environment
  • The benefits of having progressive evolution
  • How change and innovation can steer your APOC to data-drive proactive decision making as the basis for operational excellence

14:30

APOC: software doesn’t matter – data does

Thomas Sterken
Capacity planning and optimization manager
Brussels Airport Company
Belgium
Once an APOC has been established and a true collaborative culture based on trust has been created among the different partners, it is time to bring your APOC to the next level. By providing your partners not just with loads of data, but also with the right insights, collaborative decision making remains feasible in highly complex environments. This presentation will outline what an airport operations plan can bring to your airport performance and how you can ensure that it is not just another tool.

What the audience will learn

  • From data to insights as a basis for operational excellence and efficient use of resources
  • An airport operations plan as a single version of the truth on the performance of the airport
  • How data insights and not tools can bring your APOC to the next level

14:45

Operations excellence at Dubai’s multi-airport AOCC

Ronan O'Shea
Director – airport operations control centre (AOCC)
Dubai Airport
United Arab Emirates
As demand grows, customer preferences change, and airline models develop, opportunities and challenges constantly arise. Dubai Airports' multi-airport system relies on an agile AOCC to jointly develop innovative ways to enhance service delivery, operational performance and resilience. The company's commitment to working towards a total airport management (TAM) operating model is helping it to adapt and improve the efficiency of its operation and ultimately the experience for its 90m+ passengers.

What the audience will learn

  • The importance of the multi-airport AOCC to address the changing opportunities and challenges at DXB and DWC
  • The key success enablers for effective collaboration and operations excellence in an airport environment
  • The benefits for Dubai Airports' passengers and service partners so far
  • Dubai Airports' approach to TAM and the roadmap ahead

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30

MAG IT's quest for total airport management

Stuart Hutson
Chief technology officer
Manchester Airport Group (MAG)
UK
Lukman Abdul-Karim
Head of IT strategy
Manchester Airport Group (MAG)
UK
MAG IT has been on a quest for total airport management (TAM) for a number of years. The presentation will reveal how MAG has used the latest innovations in delivery and technology to move away from the big bang approach to strategic programs of work, and now is able to deliver strategic initiatives in a more iterative approach, thus alleviating the risks to the business as well as delivering benefits early. The talk will cover concepts such as A-CDM and iAOP and how these key initiatives, as well as the latest approaches to data integration/data and analytics, all add to the concept of TAM.

What the audience will learn

  • How MAG has approach TAM - iterative over big bang
  • How key initiatives, such as ACDM, iAOP, and data and analytics all add up to support TAM
  • What IT architectural principles you need to be aware of to support TAM
  • What MAG has delivered so far, including challenges and successes to date
  • How DevOps and agile delivery methodologies can help you on your path to TAM

16:00

The airport operations center in action

Laurence Faure
Head of passenger services department at Paris-Orly Airport
Groupe ADP
France
Kamal Amri
APOC senior manager Paris-Orly Airport
Groupe ADP
France
The airport operations center (APOC) is a collaborative approach to improve performance and build a global picture of airport operations. By sharing information and real-time data with all stakeholders, APOC enhances passenger satisfaction and quality of service from landside to airside. The fluidity of road access, the performance of baggage sorting machines, the quality of ground handling operations and the reliability of technical installations are all subjects that contribute to the punctuality of the airport. The APOC solution brings together in one place experts able to solve problems, implement curfew management solutions and predict future developments.

What the audience will learn

  • Anticipate: how the APOC is proactive in the face of foreseeable disruptions and is never without resources
  • Pilot and maneuver: how the APOC and each actor in its perimeter conduct the operations at their level
  • Collaborate: so that decisions are made in a collaborative way and collectively assumed by the stakeholders
  • Progress: so that crises are experienced and remembered as opportunities to learn and advance operations
  • Implementation: the principles as described in the operational concept

16:30 - 17:30

Panel Discussion: Lessons learned from APOC implementation

What came first, KPIs or Process Models?

What the audience will learn

  • How has the APOC changed your terminal operating models?
  • How are you monitoring and reacting to real time KPIs?
  • How do you coordinate performance with stakeholders (both in and out of the APOC)?
  • Which is better: Centralised or Distributed APOCs?
  • What contingencies do you plan for major outages of the APOC facilities/infrastructure
Claudio Dutary
General manager operations department
Tocumen International Airport
Panama
Ronan O'Shea
Director – airport operations control centre (AOCC)
Dubai Airport
United Arab Emirates
Korijn Defever
Operational improvement manager
Brussels Airport Company
Belgium
Kamal Amri
APOC senior manager Paris-Orly Airport
Groupe ADP
France
Panel Moderators:
Alaistair Deacon, airport operational systems consultant, Toasty Solutions Limited
Etienne van Zuijlen, lead business development - airport operations, SITA

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS Ceremony & Drinks Reception! Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Technovation: Innovation & Transformation (Continued)

Day 2: Wednesday, June 10

Technovation: Innovation & Transformation
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Maurice Jenkins
Division director, information systems
Miami Dade Aviation Department
USA
Catherine Mayer
Vice president
SITA
USA

09:05

AI as a requirement for the growth of the aviation industry

Abhi Chacko
Head of enabling tech and digital innovation
Gatwick Airport
UK
Christiaan Hen
Chief customer officer
Assaia International
Netherlands
The demand for air travel is growing faster than airports can expand their capacity. It is therefore essential that new, smart solutions be implemented in order to increase the utilization of existing infrastructure. This presentation will highlight how AI technology can work as a catalyst on CDM and AOP frameworks in order to make airports more efficient and safe. The presentation will introduce this line of thinking but also show concrete examples and considerations when using these kinds of solutions in airport environments.

What the audience will learn

  • The potential of AI to close the gap between demand and capacity
  • Different scenarios about how airports and airlines can work together to leverage the value of data
  • The shortcomings of CDM and AOP that can be fixed with smart technologies
  • The potential benefits of AI and computer vision technology with regards to efficiency and safety
  • Best practices and lessons learned in using this tech within the industry

09:35

Driving operational efficiency through digital transformation and data analytics

Nicholas Woods
Chief information officer
Manchester Airport Group (MAG)
UK
This presentation will provide an overview of how MAG has approached the digital transformation of airport operations across the group. From developing a data strategy and building the investment case, through to driving delivery and business change with cross-functional teams, the presentation will explore the journey so far, including the key successes and lessons learned.

What the audience will learn

  • Digitizing airport operations
  • Bridging the divide between business and technology
  • An open architecture approach to embrace technology disruption and opportunity

10:05

Digital transformation and innovation at #BLRAirport

Suresh Khadakbhavi
General manager Innovation Lab
Bangalore International Airport
India
Digital technology and Innovation have the potential to transform air travel. The airport business, which until now has been a predominantly bricks-and-mortar business, is now looking at digital intervention in all aspects of operations, maintenance, commercial and the passenger journey. Creating an API ecosystem and a shared economy. Data-driven insights have the potential to make the journey of the air traveler more meaningful and memorable. Efficiencies can be enhanced in passenger processing using a biometric boarding system and other technologies for smart security. Airside operations and airport asset management (fixed and mobile) can be transformed with the use of IoT devices and analytics.

What the audience will learn

  • Digital transformation
  • Biometric travel
  • IoT and asset management
  • Creation of API ecosystem and economy
  • Data intelligence and analytics center of excellence

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

Automation, below the wing

Sarah Kelly
Automation manager
International Airlines Group
UK
There has been a huge focus on digitizing the customer journey: booking, airport and onboard experiences. This has changed the way airlines interact with passengers, but what about the parts of our operation customers don’t see? Technology breakthroughs such as drones, robotics, autonomous vehicles and AI are changing how people and technology interact in society and industry, but airport baggage, ramp and logistics have remained largely unchanged for years, providing a great opportunity for automation and innovation. The presenter will talk about how emerging technologies can be applied, revolutionizing the way airports, airlines and ground handlers operate in the future.

What the audience will learn

  • Below the wing operations have barely changed for years - making it a great opportunity area for innovation and automation
  • An overview of IAG's automation strategy
  • A summary of previous and current trials at IAG's hub airports (including autonomous vehicles, baggage robotics and the 'smart stand')
  • How IAG is working with airports to make this a reality
  • What the industry can do to accelerate automation

11:25

Digital visualization of the ramp process

Steven Yiu
Deputy director, service delivery
Airport Authority Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Dr Jerrel Leung
Chief architect
ubiZense Ltd
Hong Kong
With the Internet of Things (IoT) driving an interconnected future forward at breakneck speed, Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) has been working to create even smarter processes. One of the latest innovations is the IoT-augmented airfield service system, or AS2 – a cloud-based service-oriented system that lends visibility to real-time operations through descriptive and predictive AI-enabled analytics. Among its many potentials, the AS2 Phase 1 enables the ramp handling operators to better manage arrival baggage delivery with a multidimensional dashboard service supported by on-demand analytics, which matches estimated flight arrival data with equipment readiness as revealed by IoT.

What the audience will learn

  • Revolutionize digital ramp operation with IoT Data and beyond - Big Data broker for airport community stakeholders
  • Enabling real-time automated turnaround visibility and record capture to facilitate operate-to-plan
  • Single source of truth – safeguarding and enforcing data accuracy and security
  • Enable data-driven management – from management by experience to management by data
  • Descriptive and predictive analytics to monitor operations status and detect any anomalies

11:55

Strategies to advance passenger boarding bridges (PBB) operations in SCA

Damien Poh
Manager, aerobridge and aircraft docking system
Changi Airport Group (Singapore) Pte Ltd
Singapore
Currently, PBB operators at Changi Airport perform manual pre-arrival operation checks on PBBs, and are trained to operate them using actual PBB and mock-up fuselage. Such training and manual checks pose challenges in an operational environment and produce inconsistencies in the checks. Through automation and innovation, PBBs can now be checked and operated in a consistent manner. Changi Airport is working on the automation of pre-arrival PBB checks to further reduce potential human errors. We are also exploring the use of a PBB training simulator to improve operator proficiency and productivity, enhance docking safety and efficiency, and provide consistency in training.

What the audience will learn

  • Automation of PBB docking
  • Automated pre-operation system check
  • PBB virtual reality training

12:40 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45 - 14:45

Panel Discussion: The modern airport: sibling rivalry in the digital age

As significant centers of economic activity in every major community around the world, modern airports are also hubs of mass-scale digital activity. From information collection, processing and dissemination, to e-commerce, predictive analytics and complex information processing, an airport's digital sibling is more than just a twin. This session brings together world airport tech leaders to discuss many issues related to today's digital reality. What does the airport’s digital doppelgänger really look like? How do airports develop their digital alter egos? How will the future airport digital ecosystem work? The speakers will also look at real industry-level programs aimed at creating the foundations of the airport digital revolution.

What the audience will learn

  • How airports have evolved on their own digital transformation journeys
  • How to develop an effective digital strategy
  • How the future digital ecosystem might work
  • Leveraging industry programs to help airports on their digital transformation journeys
Gilles Lévêque
Group CIO
Groupe ADP
France
Michael Zaddach
Senior vice president IT
Flughafen München GmbH
Germany
Sjoerd Blüm
Chief information officer
Royal Schiphol Group
Netherlands
Maurice Jenkins
Division director, information systems
Miami Dade Aviation Department
USA
Panel Moderator:
Catherine Mayer, vice president, SITA

14:45

Driving digital disruption at scale

Justin Barritt
VP product
MAGO
UK
Get the low-down on how MAGO, Manchester Airport Group’s digital business, was established and rapidly scaled from 5-150 digital natives within two hugely challenging years. Learn how a culture of experimentation delivered over £5m additional income and how new customer-centric experiences and accelerated product diversification are combating disruption while creating sustainable new lines of business. As the business matures, find out how MAGO is now evolving from a product to a platform business, and building an airport ecosystem and leading-edge user experiences that are fit for the future.

What the audience will learn

  • Facing the challenge of digital disruption and the need to scale at pace
  • Transitioning to an experimentation culture to drive innovation
  • Leveraging customer validation, discovery and rapid iteration to accelerate speed to market of new products while reducing risk
  • Evolving from product to platform thinking to drive agility, cost efficiency and more joined-up customer experiences
  • Testing and evolving our digital capabilities to meet the needs of tomorrow

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30

The use of drones in airports

Enrique Sanchez Cuellar
Head of Electrotechnic and Airfield Ground Lighting Lab
AENA
Spain
Pablo Lopez-Loeches
Innovation project manager
AENA
Spain
Nowadays, drones are a clear hot topic. This presentation will deal with the different uses of drones in a controlled way within airports, enabling many tasks to be optimized and made more efficient. This implies operating drones inside controlled airspace, coordinated with regular air traffic, in accordance with current legislation. As an airport management company, in Aena we have used drones for calibration of visual aids and air navigation equipment, FOD detection, obstacle measurement and pavement revision – and we have planned other useful features for the airport field.

What the audience will learn

  • Regulations for flying drones in airports
  • Different uses of drones in airports
  • Examples and case studies of AENA

16:00

Sustainable innovations

Karin Gylin
Head of innovation
Swedavia AB
Sweden
Mats Berglind
Digital innovation manager
Swedavia AB
Sweden
In recent years, Swedavia has conducted a number of proofs of concept and implemented a number of solutions to make Swedavia more sustainable and the world a little better. This presentation shares the lessons from these proofs of concept and the solutions, from using new data to save energy to connected runways, exploring how innovation can help make sustainability possible.

What the audience will learn

  • Swedavia's sustainability goals
  • Lessons from actual proofs of concept at Swedavia's airports
  • What effects our sustainable solutions have delivered

16:30

Digital strategic planning in the Israel Airports Authority

Michael Ruff
Deputy director general, information systems
Israel Airports Authority
Israel
Ralphy Speier
Senior strategic IT consultant
R.S. & Co Information Technology Consultants
Israel
The presentation will discuss the journey toward digital transformation in alignment with the business strategy of the Authority. The presentation will describe how we derived the digital strategy from the business strategy, and will introduce the components of the digital strategy.

What the audience will learn

  • A glimpse of the IAA's business strategy
  • Digital strategic planning – how it was incorporated into the Israeli Airports Authority's business strategy
  • The main components and highlights of the IAA's digital strategy
  • Integrating innovation into the business strategy
  • Customer involvement during the realization stages

17:00

Innovation opportunities that every airport can tap into

Pierre Lanthier
Director - IT strategy, innovation and business transformation
Greater Toronto Airports Authority
Canada
Sahadev Singh
Vice president and global head – engineering, construction and operations
Wipro Limited
UK
Across airports, there are always innovation opportunities that can be found in common daily challenges faced by passengers and various airport stakeholders. What is needed is a different lens to look at common challenges and identify innovative solutions to address these. The technology innovation program at Toronto Pearson is focused on driving such innovations by leveraging the potential of AI, IoT, analytics, blockchain, BIM and RPA. The presentation covers the innovation opportunities found across business units that are not unique to Toronto Pearson and which can be tapped into by other airports as well.

What the audience will learn

  • Common technology innovation opportunities for airports
  • The innovation approach focused on solving real business challenges
  • The application of emerging technologies like AI, IoT, analytics, blockchain, BIM and RPA
  • The lessons learned

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS Ceremony & Drinks Reception! Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Aging Population & PRMs

Day 3: Thursday, June 11

Aging Population & PRMs
09:00 - 13:25

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Geraldine Lundy
Director
Accessible Travel Consultancy Ltd
UK
Roberto Castiglioni
Director
Reduced Mobility Rights Limited
UK

09:05

Disrupting the traditional way WCHC passengers fly

Josh Wintersgill
Founder and director
easyTravelseat
UK
For too long, WCHC passengers have had to put up with the undignified, uncomfortable and embarrassing process of having to be manually handled in order to access an aircraft, not to mention the strain on the operational staff. The need to be physically grabbed under the arms and legs, the need to sit on an unsuitable aisle chair, the severe lack of appropriate transferring equipment at the majority of airports across the globe to facilitate a safer, more dignified and comfortable experience is still very disappointing. The easyTravelseat enhances the WCHC passengers' experience and improves operational performance.

What the audience will learn

  • What the easyTravelseat is and how it works
  • The severe lack of transferring equipment in place at airports
  • Why easyTravelseat is important to special assistance providers and airlines both operationally and for positive passenger experience

09:35

Giving confidence to passengers with a disability

Graham Race
Accessible aviation lead
Queen Elizabeth's Foundation for Disabled People
UK
Every year in the UK, tens of thousands of people with disabilities travel through airports and fly with airlines. However, only a tiny proportion know assistance is available or feel comfortable asking for it. Airports can be challenging environments both physically and mentally. Many people simply decide not to travel. To deny people that opportunity, however unintentionally, is not right. Nor is it good for an airport’s revenue line. We'll share the findings from a unique in-depth research study of people with disabilities: what they expect, need, want and hope for that will give them confidence in traveling.

What the audience will learn

  • How disabled passengers feel at each stage of their journey and what they wish airport employees would know and do
  • Specific insights about what it’s like to be a passenger with autism, dementia or a colostomy
  • What these groups and their traveling companions expect from airports and what their ideal experience would be
  • Why it’s important to an airport’s commercial key metrics
  • How to train your employees to be more empathetic and give them the tools and information they need

10:05

UK airline accessibility framework

James Fremantle
Manager, consumer policy and enforcement
UK Civil Aviation Authority
UK
The UK CAA has undertaken a wide-ranging review of the accessibility of airlines operating to and from the UK. It has reviewed the accessibility of booking procedures, check-in and boarding processes, and facilities and services on board aircraft. The review has assessed the current level of compliance with applicable legislation, as well as noting best practice. The CAA now plans to develop a framework designed to deliver improvements in airline accessibility. This will complement its airport accessibility framework which has been in place since 2014.

What the audience will learn

  • The CAA's role in terms of enforcing accessibility regulations
  • The current levels of accessibility for airlines flying from the UK
  • Sharing best practice in terms of accessibility for flights from the UK
  • Future CAA work to improve accessibility for passengers

10:35

EU legislation on the rights of passengers with reduced mobility

Andras Mogyoro
Legal officer
European Commission
Belgium
This presentation will outline the European Commission's current activities related to the rights of PRM. This will include the ongoing evaluation of Regulation (EC) 1107/2006 and the revision of the interpretative guidelines of the same regulation.

What the audience will learn

  • The European Commission is currently evaluating the regulation on the rights of PRM when traveling by air
  • Stakeholders (airports, airlines, etc) have the possibility to participate in an open public consultation that will be ongoing in April
  • In addition, stakeholders can participate in a targeted consultation (this will start around April)
  • Explain the main novelties proposed by the European Commission for the revision of the interpretative guidelines on Regulation (EC) 1107/2006
  • Explanation of how participants can give their opinions on the revision of the interpretative guidelines

11:05 - 11:25

Break

Workshop: Going beyond the current model of wheelchair assistance

Year-on-year growth of wheelchair assistance requests is stretching airport assistance services across the globe beyond capacity. Recent trials suggest that a significant share of passengers who currently request wheelchair assistance would prefer to get alternative types of assistance. This workshop will enable attendees to explore the sector’s current state of play and recent studies, discuss which viable alternatives can be implemented in the short term, and identify long-term solutions that will shape a better and more cost-effective model of wheelchair assistance.

11:25

Wheelchair assistance at airports – the passenger's perspective

Laurel Van Horn
VP director of programs
Open Doors Organization
USA
At large airports in the USA and Europe, more than one million passengers per year request assistance with mobility or navigation. Regardless of their specific needs, most are offered 'one-size-fits-all' wheelchair service and are left feeling more like a parcel than a valued customer. This presentation will examine the experience from the customer's perspective, with analysis based on findings from ACRP Report 210: Innovative Solutions to Facilitate Accessibility for Airport Travelers with Disabilities.

What the audience will learn

  • What travelers with disabilities need and want
  • Industry best-practice solutions to better meet those needs
  • Ways in which airports and airlines can help passengers be more self-reliant
  • Importance of pre-trip information and communication
  • Importance of service differentiation

11:35

Wheelchair assistance at airports

Celine Canu
Head of aviation facilitation
IATA
Canada
The presentation will review findings from experts from airlines, airports, regulators, travel agents and disabled associations to analyze the complexity of handling the special category of customers who need assistance at the airport.

What the audience will learn

  • Identifying the issue
  • Sharing practical experiences from the stakeholders
  • Promoting a culture of collaboration and customer service

11:45

How real-time data improves PRM passenger flow

William L Neece
Director of airport solutions
Ozion
France
Service operations for passengers with reduced mobility are evolving. Every year, overall passenger volumes appear to rise, as does the expectation of service. In this session we will explore how the use of good data and collaboration can improve service for passengers with reduced mobility today, and prepare for the increasing numbers of tomorrow. Airlines, airports and service providers all contribute valuable data and now have access to that combined real-time passenger operational information. We will show how this allows for the securing of each passenger, on-time flight performance and smooth overall airport operation.

What the audience will learn

  • How data and collaboration can improve service for passengers with reduced mobility
  • How optimizing resources can lead to increased passenger and employee satisfaction
  • How SSR codes and airline notifications can be used most effectively
  • How a complete view of the service benefits the airline, airport and service provider
  • How putting the passenger at the center of the service serves the entire operation

Workshop

13:25 - 14:30

Lunch

Your conference questionnaire will be sent to you by email today. See you at Passenger Terminal CONFERENCE 2021!

Airport Design, Planning & Development (Continued)

Day 3: Thursday, June 11

Airport Design, Planning & Development
09:00 - 13:25

Introduction by Conference Chair

Mark Wolfe
Principal
Hassell
Australia

09:05

BWI – Building with Innovation: the airport of tomorrow, starting today

Paul Shank
Chief engineer
MDOT MAA
USA
Chirantan Mukhopadhyay
Aviation principal
Jacobs
USA
Innovative customer service is the core of the motto ‘Easy Come Easy Go’ for Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall (BWI) Airport. Through planning, design and construction, BWI’s in-depth approach to today’s concerns provides pragmatic solutions for tomorrow and beyond. This paper demonstrates how a US$500m terminal expansion and a new baggage handling system (BHS) met airline operational needs, improved customer service and provided flexibility for aircraft mix. A creative design provided easily maintainable BHS, dramatically increased natural light for passenger comfort, and better concessions and restroom design. Lessons learned were incorporated through stakeholder participation and a new project.

What the audience will learn

  • How smaller terminal footprint design provides future flexibility of aircraft mix
  • Challenges of creating space for a new state-of-the-art BHS with expansion capability
  • How passenger experience is enhanced by natural light, concessions and restroom amenities
  • In-depth discussion of design challenges and solutions
  • How the design and construction teams uniquely collaborated to ensure successful project delivery on schedule and budget

09:35

The most important terminal planning trends – is your airport ready?

Sean Loughran
Long-range planning manager
Port of Portland
USA
Scott Tumolo
Director - terminal planning leader
C&S Companies
USA
Members of the ACI-NA Operations and Technical Affairs Committee – Planning and Development Working Group recently completed a terminal planning white paper titled Key Terminal Planning Considerations for the Next Decade. This session explores the most important terminal planning trends airport executives should be planning for as we approach the 2020s. It will clearly state these initiatives and explain their impact on airports generically. Then, the long-range planning manager from Portland International Airport will explain how his airport is planning for these initiatives, and showcase some of the projects his team is implementing to be prepared.

What the audience will learn

  • Key terminal planning considerations for the next 10 years
  • What airport executives should be thinking about before they implement their terminal development
  • A showcase of Portland International Airport's terminal development projects

10:05 - 11:05

Panel Discussion: A new working model: Heathrow’s integrated design team

Heathrow’s third runway expansion is the largest and most complex infrastructure planning application in UK history. Through an innovative approach, Heathrow assembled an integrated design team (IDT) comprising the best architects, engineers and designers with proven experience across infrastructure projects and global aviation hubs, as well as experience in complex and sensitive masterplanning. Find out how the IDT has developed its working model over the last three years to deliver exceptional designs for Heathrow, and how this collaborative model has consistently challenged the seven companies within it to strive for better solutions to highly complex design challenges.

What the audience will learn

  • Why Heathrow chose the integrated design team approach above other models of delivery
  • Find out how the ‘best athlete’ approach to tasks creates an atmosphere of healthy competition delivering highly effective outcomes
  • Discover how the IDT offers incredible expertise and great diversity of thinking
  • How IDT’s Early Career Professionals network is helping to fast-track careers and share lessons learned across Heathrow and its suppliers
  • How the IDT leadership team have evolved the model over the last three years
Barry Weekes
Head of design
Heathrow Airport
UK
David Beare
Divisional director of aviation
Mott MacDonald
UK
Steve Tasker
Market director of aviation
Atkins Global
UK
Toby Gibbs
Global environmental sciences service line leader
Wood plc
UK
Panel Moderators:
Jolyon Brewis, partner, Grimshaw
Jolyon Brewis, Partner, Grimshaw

11:05 - 11:25

Break

11:25

Planning when uncertainty is accelerating

Philippe Delaplace
Senior vice president
ADP Ingénierie
France
The new challenge is to plan flexibility. Planning is key for airports to better operate their infrastructure. But, in this ever-changing environment, how can they plan with enough precision while keeping enough flexibility to embrace upcoming and unplanned evolutions? Drawing on Groupe ADP’s experience as an operator and ADP Ingénierie’s international experience with airports all over the world, discover how to better plan and anticipate the upcoming changes and prepare for uncertainty.

What the audience will learn

  • Why changes are accelerating in the air transport industry
  • How change impacts the planning of airport development
  • How we can adapt our design approach to face this new challenge

11:55

Lean process improvement in airport construction

Jonathan Smith
Program director
Heathrow Airport
UK
Miguel Ricalde
Lean principal consultant
AECOM
UK
The supplier worked alongside the client to improve the excavation process for one airport expansion project. The process optimization project was delivered through a systematic implementation of Lean principles where the current process was fully understood, opportunities mapped and solutions developed. Through discrete scenario simulation and focusing on process flow and rhythm, potential savings of 19% time and 15% cost were demonstrated for the excavation process. The lessons from this project call us to break silos within the airport, to assess construction processes from a business perspective and reassess the flexibility of the operations stakeholders to better support necessary construction activities.

What the audience will learn

  • Importance of a holistic approach when determining the way to optimize the construction process that interphase with airport operations
  • Value creation from the inclusion of Lean practices in aviation construction projects
  • Respect, flexibility and transparency are key to deliver excellence

12:25 - 13:25

Panel Discussion: Utilizing the progressive design-build delivery method for complex aviation projects

The presentation will provide insight from two major airports experiencing rapid growth and expansion where the progressive design-build (PDB) project delivery method is being utilized. Industry experts will offer real-world examples of how the PDB contract method can be tailored to handle aggressive schedule requirements and/or contract flexibility from a cost and programming perspective. What are the advantages and challenges of this unique project delivery method? Lessons learned from the perspectives of the owner, architect, and builder will be revealed.

What the audience will learn

  • Why would an airport choose to use the progressive design-build project delivery method?
  • What are the unique traits of the progressive design-build contract?
  • Success stories that can only be delivered by progressive design-build
  • What the teams have learned from past PDB projects and how to build upon these lessons
  • The unique challenges faced by the owner, architect, and builder who enter into the progressive design-build arena
Traci Holton
Assistant vice president – development and engineering
Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority (BNA)
USA
John Aitken
Director of aviation
Mineta San Jose International Airport (SJC)
USA
Corey Ochsner
Associate principal
Fentress Architects
USA
Panel Moderator:
Scott Shelby, operations manager/project executive, Hensel Phelps

13:25 - 14:30

Lunch

Your conference questionnaire will be sent to you by email today. See you at Passenger Terminal CONFERENCE 2021!

Aviation Security, Border Control & Facilitation (Continued)

Day 3: Thursday, June 11

Aviation Security, Border Control & Facilitation
09:00 - 13:25

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Neville Hay
Director of training
Interportpolice
UK
Philipp Kriegbaum
Retired senior aviation security expert
Philipp Kriegbaum
Germany

09:05 - 10:05

Panel Discussion: TSA innovation briefing – the future travel experience

This informational briefing discusses innovation at TSA, the Innovation Task Force (ITF) mission and vision, and current and future solicitation methods. Attendees will be introduced to TSA as a thought leader in innovation/aviation security, and will leave energized and excited about how the government is facilitating public-private partnerships and how they themselves can transform aviation security.

What the audience will learn

  • The current innovation work and innovation landscape at TSA
  • ITF’s mission and vision, and the solution selection and demonstration process
  • The culture of innovation at TSA and the agency’s vision for the future
  • TSA investment in biometrics
  • TSA’s implementation of innovation in the field
Alexis Long
Chief innovation officer
Transportation Security Administration
USA
Mara Winn
Acting division director of the Innovation Task Force
Transportation Security Administration
USA
Jason Lim
Identity management capability manager
Transportation Security Administration
USA
Michael Donnelly
Transportation Security Administration Representative (TSAR) for France
Transportation Security Administration
France
Panel Moderator:
Austin Gould, assistant administrator of requirements and capabilities analysis, Transportation Security Administration

10:05

Theater of security design – upgrading security at Australian airports

Trevor Coolledge
Senior associate
Architectus
Australia
In recent tests in the USA and elsewhere, high percentages of the undercover test passengers carrying prohibited items, including a variety of weapons, made it through security screening points at major airports. To effectively transform the poor performance of security spaces, the implementation of the latest screening technology and high-quality training for security personnel needs to be matched with the deterrent offered by the successful application of the ‘theater of security design’. In Australian airports we might finally be getting it right, with security spaces that say in every way, "Just try it. You are definitely going to get caught!"

What the audience will learn

  • How the planning and design of the international security spaces at Melbourne airport successfully leverage the ‘theater of security design'
  • How specific design elements contribute to a holistic security response
  • How high-quality design assists in creating better security staff cohesion, communications and well-being, resulting in improved efficiency in throughput

10:35

Stepping stone to success – removing security checkpoints in the future

Billy Shallow
Manager, Smart Security
ACI World
Canada
Positive developments have been evident in security checkpoints over the last five years, combating evolving threats while improving efficiency and creating an enhanced customer experience. With a doubling of passengers by 2035, the checkpoint approach is not sustainable and treats everyone as a threat. It is envisioned that a ‘checkpointless’ security operation will evolve where passengers and their baggage are screened side by side at walking pace. This presentation discusses what will be achieved over the next five years and how these are stepping stones to a revolutionary future model.

What the audience will learn

  • The evolution of the checkpoint over the last 10 years
  • The evolving checkpoint over the next five years with artificial intelligence starting to make the decisions
  • Why a checkpoint is not a sustainable approach to aviation growth
  • The need to protect the whole airport infrastructure and realign mitigation to new threats
  • Opportunities to revolutionize the way we screen in the future

11:05 - 11:25

Break

11:25

Workforce planning for aviation security

L. Clint Welch
Director, aviation security and public safety
San Diego County Regional Airport Authority
USA
Jeffery Oboy
Partner
M2P Consulting
USA
The threat to security remains for airports. New fears over the ‘insider’ and the introduction of drones have many arguing that the threat has in fact increased. At the same time, major innovations are unleashing a new ‘art of the possible’ for responding to these developments. Considering this and the need to work through the complexities presented by growth and construction, San Diego Airport asked itself whether it was adequately staffed and optimally organized to deliver on its security and safety responsibilities. The airport also needed to demonstrate that it was doing so in the most fiscally responsible manner.

What the audience will learn

  • Overview of the latest threats and expectations on aviation security
  • How San Diego approached this exercise including stakeholders and methodology
  • Overview of the most common opportunities uncovered and mutually shared with benchmarked airports
  • How the results were presented and recommendations proven for the executive team and board
  • Lessons learned for those considering carrying out a similar exercise in the future

11:55

Public area security enhancement measures

Mark Crosby
Principal consultant
Ross & Baruzzini
USA
Airport public areas are susceptible to a myriad of threats from terrorism to public protests to persons in mental health crisis. This presentation will help airport operators, designers, and consultants mitigate the threats to airport public areas.

What the audience will learn

  • Enhancement Measure #1: Conducting a security vulnerability assessment, with an explanation of what that includes
  • Enhancement Measure #2: Better infrastructure design and equipment, with an explanation of areas to consider when designing facilities and buying equipment
  • Enhancement Measure #3: Communications, with an outline of several areas to improve communication when responding to a public area incident
  • Enhancement Measure #4: Policies and Plans, with a discussion of the plans and policies important to ensuring an effective response
  • Enhancement Measure #5: Training and Staffing, with a review of critical training and staffing elements to ensure public area incidents are mitigated

12:25

Guidance for airport security access control systems: the stakeholder’s view

Dr Jonathan Branker
Industry SME
RTCA Inc
USA
As stakeholders, airport operators, airlines, and security personnel universally accept the paradigm that their main focus is on the safety and security of travelers without jeopardizing the passenger experience. Passengers are insulated from the behind-the-scenes technological changes that stakeholders need to continuously update as they focus on possible breaches by disgruntled employees, malicious acts (both internal and external), and how to identify and mitigate the changing threat landscape. This presentation will focus on the continuing development of the guidance developed by the RTCA Special Committee 224 in the form of consensus-based recommendations on airport security access control issues.

What the audience will learn

  • Update on the guidance under development by RTCA SC-224
  • Advances in biometrics, facial recognition, AI and neural networks
  • Credentialing for unescorted access and general aviation
  • Video surveillance and privacy concerns
  • The changing insider threat landscape, disgruntled employees, and malicious activities

12:55

Schiphol: implementing landside security in a growing airport

Tom van Maastrigt
Strategic advisor - aviation security
Royal Schiphol Group
Netherlands
After the Brussels incident in 2016, Schiphol started several activities to cope with the impact of such a disaster. Meanwhile, Schiphol is facing an increase in passenger numbers and traffic flow. Trying to keep the airport accessible while implementing new landside security measures, and developing a landside accessibility program while keeping the airport secure are challenging jobs for all parties involved.

What the audience will learn

  • The motive for landside security at Schiphol, what steps Schiphol had to take before being able to start implementing landside security measures, and what kinds of measures have been and will be implemented
  • The complexity of implementing landside security measures while growth needs to be facilitated and accessibility and operational continuity guaranteed
  • Is there a difference in implementing landside security measures in existing and new infrastructure?
  • The lessons learned so far

13:25 - 14:30

Lunch

Your conference questionnaire will be sent to you by email today. See you at Passenger Terminal CONFERENCE 2021!

Commercial Development, Retail, Concessions & Media (Continued)

Day 3: Thursday, June 11

Commercial Development, Retail, Concessions & Media
09:00 - 13:25

Introduction by Conference Chair

Jeremy Corfield
Partner
CPI
Australia

09:05

Inflight retail reinvented

Chris Pok
CEO
KrisShop [by video]
Singapore
Kian Gould
CEO and founder
AOE
Germany
The growing focus on sustainability, the ever faster-changing customer behavior driven by a mobile world, and declining inflight sales are forcing airlines to rethink their inflight business models. Travelers today are more demanding in terms of the product offering, the overall inflight experience and how this fits in their customer journey. These days, travelers are looking for the ability to pre-order 60 minutes before the flight departure, home delivery, personalized offers and extensive product catalogs and services. By changing their supply chain, airlines can reduce their CO2 footprint, drive revenues up and improve the customer experience before, during and post-travel, matching the expectations of today's travelers.

What the audience will learn

  • Why inflight retail has to be reinvented or become obsolete – see how Singapore Airlines with AOE changed the business model
  • Why travel retail e-commerce is one of the biggest untapped revenue opportunities for airlines
  • How to capture a €50bn market of loyalty points to double-spend per pay for an airline
  • How airlines can finally use their wealth of customer data for truly personal and seamless shopping experiences
  • How luxury shopping is a huge untapped market for airlines

09:35

Future of Narita Airport’s retailing strategy

Atsuro Kaneko
Staff, retail operations department
Narita International Airport Corporation
Japan
Since its opening in 1978, Narita Airport has evolved not only as an airport, but also as one of the best commercial spaces in Japan. Narita Airport has been focusing on expanding its sales by introducing popular brand stores and restaurants, and aims to strengthen the retailing strategy even further. The presentation will discuss the rising revenues at Narita Airport, the newly opened stores and the future vision of the commercial space.

What the audience will learn

  • Explanation about the rising sales in shops and restaurants, and an overview of the newly opened stores at Narita Airport
  • Brief summary of the growing numbers of foreign visitors coming to Japan and the sales effect at Narita Airport
  • Future plans for the commercial area at Narita Airport

10:05

The outside investment model for Taoyuan's duty-free stores

Rouyou Lin
Senior clerk, business department
Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport
Taiwan
Yuting Tsai
Staff, sales department commercial group
Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport
Taiwan
This presentation will share the experience, concept and strategy of the previous administration, bringing out the current status of the formulations for commercial models by introducing a specialized business service for non-government enterprises. This has led to the airport service becoming more innovative and diverse. In addition, it has not only lowered the airport's costs but also increased the overall operational efficiency.

What the audience will learn

  • The experience at TIA
  • The execution status
  • Customer service at TIA

10:35

A central receiving and distribution facility (CRDF) case study analysis

Heather Leide
Director, airport development
Metropolitan Airports Commission
USA
Steve Wareham
Associate vice president
Landrum & Brown
USA
A CRDF operates as a pass-through dock for airport terminal receivables. CRDFs are best located on airport grounds with public delivery docks, internal receiving, a screening area and a secured area with outbound docks and trucks. Airports utilize CRDCs to improve concessions delivery logistics as well as enhance security. Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport (MSP) implemented a contracted managed loading dock program in 2005. This facility outgrew its location and MSP recently opened a new CRDF. MSP’s internal analysis and experience can serve as a template to help airports decide: Is a CRDF right for our airport?

What the audience will learn

  • The basics of a CRDF: receiving, inspection/security and outbound sortation and delivery
  • How MSP’s expanding concessions program necessitated the need to build a CRDF
  • Potential costs as well as airport savings that can be credited to the overall operation
  • Various ways that many airports cover the capital and operating costs of a CRDF
  • How to make an informed decision as to the size and costs of operating a CRDF for their own location

11:05 - 11:25

Break

11:25

Ingredients for the wow factor

Kyrian Eke
Senior aviation consultant
Munich Airport International
Germany
The presentation will take the audience through some key internal initiatives that airports need to have in place in to create the foundation for delivering the WOW factor for its passengers. It will explain how these WOW factor initiatives increase the non–aeronautical revenues of any airport. These initiatives can be tailor made for each airport therefore they don’t have to be expensive - on the contrary in most cases they are revenue generators.

What the audience will learn

  • The importance of staff/community engagement in relation to the passenger experience
  • Creating a wow factor by adopting a sense of place
  • Benefits of creating a wow at an airport
  • The changing expectations of our passengers

11:55

Expanding to increase capacity and deliver luxury retail experience

Peter Daley
Project director
Hamad International Airport
Qatar
Simon Griffiths
Executive principal
Aedas Singapore
Qatar
The presentation will provide an overview of how the expansion of Hamad International Airport – one of the world’s fastest-growing hubs – will be planned to provide a seamless, integrated, world-class passenger experience through multi-dimensional lifestyle offerings. It will showcase how HIA will deliver on the promise of ‘airport of the future’ and enhance the passenger journey through world-class art, digital technology, fresh retail and dining concepts, an indoor garden and new leisure attractions, in one expansive terminal. HIA and QDF will work together with brand partners to explore and implement innovative retail concepts at the airport to curate memorable retail experiences for travelers.

What the audience will learn

  • Expansion requirements and approach
  • Enhanced customer experience
  • More retail options and lounge offerings

12:25

Airport retail is media

Melvin Broekaart
Founder and CEO
Aircommerce Group
Netherlands
Physical retail stores are transitioning from being primarily a distribution channel for products to becoming a powerful media channel for branded experiences and stories. Airport retail stores are no exception to this transition, as declining spend-per-passenger numbers have been indicating over the past few years. It’s a transition that will change everything, including how retailers generate revenue and how store success is measured. Passengers' brand immersion will become the store’s greatest value driver. Applying a similar calculation to airport stores as we do for online traffic, this places the (concession) value of airport retail space in a whole new light.

What the audience will learn

  • How to measure the value of airport brand experiences
  • Why physical airport retail stores are transitioning
  • How to generate revenue that compensates for the decline in spend per passenger
  • How to attract completely new, currently non-existing store concepts to the airport

12:55

Airports as brands

Juan de Lascurain
Chief dreamer
Dream Big
Mexico
This presentation will discuss how airports can maximize their potential to become recognized brands. By developing original merchandising and retail spaces and manufacturing local products, airports can enter one of the fastest-growing segments in the travel industry.

What the audience will learn

  • How to brand your airport
  • Manufacturing locally
  • Social responsibility

13:25 - 14:30

Lunch

Your conference questionnaire will be sent to you by email today. See you at Passenger Terminal CONFERENCE 2021!

Customer Service & Passenger Experience (Continued)

Day 3: Thursday, June 11

Customer Service & Passenger Experience
09:00 - 13:25

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Hiosvany Muina
Senior director passenger service USA
DNATA
USA
Catherine Mayer
Vice president
SITA
USA

09:05

Moving forward with fast travel at Narita Airport

Noriaki Kataoka
Assistant manager
Narita International Airport Corporation
Japan
At Narita Airport, the number of passengers has increased in recent years due to rising demand for visits to Japan. This trend is expected to continue, but expansion of terminal facilities is difficult to achieve in the short term. Therefore, Narita Airport is promoting fast travel to optimize the use of its existing facilities. It is proceeding with the introduction of boarding procedures (OneID) using biometric authentication technology. The presenter will outline the initiatives and issues such as privacy measures that have been encountered along the way.

What the audience will learn

  • Overview of the One ID project at Narita Airport
  • Protection of personal information and privacy policies
  • How to support a more convenient customer experience in fast travel

09:35

Improving the (digital) airport experience

Anette Schouls
Manager digital airport & recovery
Air France-KLM
Netherlands
With airline industry demand growing 20x faster than capacity (by 2040), we have to prioritize innovation of the airport experience in departure halls, transfer desks, and business class lounges. With the renovation of KLM's flagship business class lounge at Schiphol, KLM aimed to do more than simply upgrade the facilities of the lounge. With the ambition to close the gap between the offline & online world, a completely new service design has been implemented.

What the audience will learn

  • How to spot opportunities that truly impact the customer experience
  • To use the value of learning and progress to the value of the deliverable
  • How to make sure you make a great product or service
  • How to ensure employee and customer adoption
  • How to deal with agile software development and not so agile airport constructions

10:05

Innovation for an exceptional end-to-end passenger experience

Anita Natarajan
Director, head of global airports operations
Uber
USA
More than ever before, passengers want convenience, speed and personalization at the tap of a button, all in one place. Our view is that the travel industry should work together – airports, airlines, technology companies, transportation providers, etc – to seamlessly connect and handoff customers at the transition points. When harnessed, technology can facilitate the transition to create a frictionless travel experience that passengers would like to repeat. Measurement is also important: partners in the travel ecosystem who own different parts of the customer journey should be data driven, basing decisions and new ideas on the data versus anecdotal observations.

What the audience will learn

  • Deep knowledge to build innovative customer experiences: listening to customers, making the mundane magical and offering unexpected moments of personalization
  • Learning and application on how thoughtful innovation requires cross-collaboration with airport partners and contributors to the end-to-end passenger journey
  • Highlighting lessons learned on how incremental micro-innovations can create step-change enhancements to the end-to-end passenger experience at airports
  • Case studies and lessons on leveraging technology and measuring our joint success with metrics in multiple channels over time
  • Models and frameworks to approach long-term vision for ground transportation at airports, from which other airports can benefit

10:35

How to optimize passenger flow and experience using security wait times

Martin Rubinstein
AVP - digital and social
Dallas Fort Worth International Airport
USA
Michiel Munneke
CEO
M2Mobi
Netherlands
Passengers traveling through DFW Airport can now see live security waiting times for every checkpoint and every lane. This session gives an insight into how DFW Airport became the first airport to offer this native feature for its passengers. The app gives passengers a clear overview of all 16 checkpoints and their lanes. This allows passengers to decide whether the nearest checkpoint is also the fastest to go through. To work properly, each checkpoint and lane has its own measuring. This session also provides insight into how the security wait times flow is designed.

What the audience will learn

  • How live security wait times contribute to an even smoother journey
  • How DFW Airport became the first airport to offer live wait times for every checkpoint and lane
  • How the DFW Airport app is becoming increasingly relevant to passengers to download.

11:05 - 11:25

Break

11:25

Understanding the traveler journey through eye tracking: opportunities and examples

Erik Siwkowski
Senior research consultant
Tobii Pro AB
Sweden
To deliver an excellent passenger experience, airports face the challenge of gaining relevant traveler insights that have a considerable impact on airport service quality. By studying the visual attention of travelers throughout their journeys, for example in wayfinding studies, eye tracking, in conjunction with methods such as surveys, in-depth interviews, footfall and/or shadowing, provides insights that allow for concrete improvement actions. In this talk, airports will learn how visual attention, engagement and understanding connect, which business decisions eye tracking can provide actionable insights to and which best practices have been uncovered during many years of conducting passenger experience studies with eye tracking.

What the audience will learn

  • What actionable insights to expect when seeing through the eyes of passengers
  • Insights and tips from wayfinding studies conducted with eye tracking
  • How to map the traveler journey and highlight improvement potential
  • Why eye tracking provides highly visual and easy-to-understand traveler statements and stories
  • Best practices for running an eye-tracking study to understand the passenger journey

11:55

Using social media to connect with digital travelers

Kevin Cullinane
Head of communications
Cork Airport
Ireland
The presentation will offer an insight into how Cork Airport uses different social media channels to promote its services, grow its brand and connect with digital travelers as Ireland's best-loved airport. We will share what has worked well and how social media fits into our wider marketing strategy to compete and grow as Ireland's fastest-growing international airport. Learn how business strategy allied to a brand transformation has led to this success, and why passengers love taking off from Cork Airport.

What the audience will learn

  • How you can use different social media channels to promote your services, grow your brand and connect with digital travelers
  • Hear what has worked well and how social media fits into your wider marketing strategy
  • Learn brand and digital marketing lessons from Ireland's best social media team working for Ireland's fastest-growing airport

12:25

Bot or not? How is a chatbot useful for our passengers?

Monika Półtorzycka-Jon
Marketing and PR manager
Wrocław Airport
Poland
Airports are exploring possibilities to meet the needs of mobile passengers who want to receive information immediately and effortlessly. To respond to passengers' expectations, Wrocław Airport has developed an advanced chatbot. Integrated with the airport’s information system, it sends flight updates, facilitates finding flights and booking tickets and, by automatically answering hundreds of questions supported by online experts, assists passengers traveling through Wrocław Airport. The system pushes incentives to shop and dine, thereby enhancing the airport’s revenue. Appreciated by passengers and rewarded by experts, the chatbot has opened a new era of communication at Wrocław Airport. This presentation comes with practical examples and a case study.

What the audience will learn

  • How to use a chatbot as a 24h passenger assistant during travel from the airport
  • How to integrate popular social media channels with the airport information system and provide passengers with tools that will be useful during their journey
  • How to use a chatbot to enhance non-aviation revenue
  • How to communicate better with passengers and make their travel experience as smooth as possible

12:55

Improving the passenger experience through innovation, training, communications, and sustainability

Allen Lainez
Airports training and service excellence director
Copa Airlines
Panama
During this presentation the audience will learn the following with reference to generating accountability and ownership and assuring a successful adoption. Listening to the customer's voice, involving technology and innovation to deploy a new project, developing a winning training plan beyond the classroom, engaging users in developing an assertive communications plan, and developing and sharing a plan to be sustainable.

What the audience will learn

  • How to develop an integral adoption process
  • The importance of listening to customer needs and innovating
  • How to develop a training plan that best fits to customers' needs
  • How to engage leaders and the frontline in developing a good communications plan
  • How to develop a winning sustainability plan

13:25 - 14:30

Lunch

Your conference questionnaire will be sent to you by email today. See you at Passenger Terminal CONFERENCE 2021!

Facilities Maintenance & Management

Day 3: Thursday, June 11

Facilities Maintenance & Management
09:00 - 13:25

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Michael Riseborough
Director terminal infrastructure
Greater Toronto Airports Authority
Canada
David Tomber
Director of strategic consulting
Woolpert
USA

09:05

Overview of airport asset management

Eric Coupaye
Technical director
Aéroports de Paris SA
France
Patrick Rallett
Senior manager
Groupe ADP
France
Unlike many assets managers for whom the best strategy is to let their assets reach obsolescence and then demolish/rebuild, the Groupe ADP has chosen to maintain its terminals, even the oldest ones, and bring them back at the level of recent air terminals. This choice, which has limited the need for new investments, has been validated by experience. We have therefore moved to piloting renovations with the 'condition-based renovation' index, which is more economical than a systematic renovation policy and more effective in terms of robustness and reliability than a purely corrective renovation policy.

What the audience will learn

  • An airport resembling an industrial site
  • An asset management policy for better alignment within the company
  • Implementation of an asset management method for more than 10 years

09:35

Integrating asset management with terminal design vision, guidelines and standards

Heather Karch
Architecture manager
Port of Seattle
USA
David Tomber
Director of strategic consulting
Woolpert
USA
This session will focus on integrating asset management with terminal design standards using Seattle Airport as an example. Seattle Airport has recently developed an innovative strategy document that brands design vision, articulates clear design guidelines and establishes design standards for terminal development. An asset management program is now being developed by the airport to integrate with and complement the standards. Creative terminal aesthetics alone are not enough for maintaining ongoing terminal performance, optimizing costs or even winning prestigious recognition like SKYTRAX awards. This session will show how to integrate design brand with asset management best practices.

What the audience will learn

  • Return on investment for integrating asset management with terminal design strategy
  • Approaches for integrating asset management with terminal design vision, guidelines and standards
  • How to create a unique sense of place while ensuring that terminals are cost-effective to operate, maintain and renew
  • Innovative approaches to design and facility management resulting in best-in-class terminals that improve performance, optimize costs and enhance the passenger experience
  • Fresh thoughts on a creative new approach to the future of terminal design and management

10:05

Innovative use of ISO55001 to drive risk management for FM

Gary Merrow
Vice president facilities
Atlanta Airlines Terminal Company
USA
Craig Omundsen
Asset management and O&M specialist
Jacobs
USA
Craig will share the innovative solution applied at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport to reduce risks at their Central Utility Plants. He will reveal the transformation with the move to conform with ISO 55001 and in-depth information about methods used to drive improvements within risk management for facilities maintenance. Gary will discuss lessons learned, including return on investment (ROI) strategies and a five-year roadmap for continuous improvement between AATC and outsourced partners. The presenters will provide their fresh perspective about planning for the airport's future success by delivering a positive ROI through risk management elements of ISO 55001.

What the audience will learn

  • Innovative solutions to reduce risk
  • In-depth information about methodology for facilities maintenance risk management
  • How Atlanta Airlines Terminal Company manages its asset management
  • Lessons for delivery of return on investment (ROI) strategies
  • Lessons for delivery of a roadmap for outsourced partners

10:35

Kansas City Airport (MCI) asset management program and BIM/Maximo integration

Ian Redhead
Deputy director of aviation
Kansas City Missouri Aviation Department
USA
Manik Arora
President and CEO
Arora Engineers Inc
USA
On the verge of building a brand-new terminal, Kansas City International Airport (MCI) sought to incorporate a new asset management software that has the ability to monitor and manage the full lifecycle of MCI's enterprise assets, such as facilities, communications, transportation, production and infrastructure in the new maintenance facility building. Electronic Data Inc (EDI) was tasked with the implementation of Maximo and the migration of data from the primary BIM model to Maximo. This smaller, successful project is a prelude to a much larger implementation during the development of the new terminal, set to open in 2023.

What the audience will learn

  • How to maintain the lifecycle of an asset from design, to construction, to maintenance
  • How to lower an airport's investment to create and maintain asset data
  • The challenges and solutions during the implementation and migration of data
  • The advantage and cost savings of implementing asset management programs during design and construction vs. retrofitting

11:05 - 11:25

Break

11:25 - 12:25

Panel Discussion: Industry experts share perspectives on asset management best practices

A global panel of seasoned industry experts will share frank and candid perspectives on asset management best practices for airport terminals. Practices that work at one airport or region may not work at another for a variety of reasons. This panel will explore common and differing practices, along with the underlying reasons. The panel representatives are from airports in Atlanta, Dublin, New York, Singapore and Toronto. Discussion topics include enterprise asset management systems, asset inventory, condition assessments, digital and data management, maintenance policies and practices, levels of service, and CIP and annual O&M funding procedures.

What the audience will learn

  • Is ISO 55001 certification a must to optimize value, or can an airport simply use IAM best practices?
  • What are the most effective strategies for getting leadership buy-in for an asset management program?
  • How do you align asset management, maintenance management and workforce planning on a digital platform?
  • What are the most effective strategies for justifying capital renewal funding to airport and airline decision makers?
  • How can planners and designers ensure terminals are cost-effective to operate, maintain and renew?
Fong Kok Wai
Advisor, Changi East
Changi Airport Group (Singapore) Pte Ltd
Singapore
Michael Moran
General manager
Port Authority of New York & New Jersey
USA
Michael Riseborough
Director terminal infrastructure
Greater Toronto Airports Authority
Canada
Gary Merrow
Vice president facilities
Atlanta Airlines Terminal Company
USA
Neil Moran
Head of digital asset management and transformation
Dublin Airport
Ireland
Panel Moderator:
David Tomber, director of strategic consulting, Woolpert

12:25

Airport public address systems' audio quality – it does matter

Todd VanGerpen
Manager, innovation and systems
Seattle-Tacoma International Airport
USA
It seems that public address (PA) system audio in an airport rarely gets the attention that a critical airport system deserves. In many cases a PA system is installed almost as an afterthought. But a PA system goes well beyond simply putting a grid pattern of speakers in the ceiling, connecting these to an amplifier, and giving someone a microphone. This presentation will give a real-life example of audio success in a new facility, provide information regarding a reference document that is invaluable to airports, and address the human factor in terminal announcements.

What the audience will learn

  • The importance of quality audio in a facility
  • About Report ACRP 175
  • The importance of how staff make public address announcements
  • That PA systems are needed to inform, educate and control guest behavior (flight boarding). They are an essential customer service tool
  • That speech intelligibility at .60 should be the minimum target for an airport environment

12:55

Making your asset management plan take flight

Nick Jensen
Director, asset management
Edmonton International Airport
Canada
Martin Gordon
Director, asset management
WSP
Canada
Airports help regional economies extend their reach and often face many of the same challenges that local governments do. They have a portfolio of diverse infrastructure that supports a variety of services to customers in a challenging, dynamic environment. Edmonton International Airport has implemented an asset management program that began with the successful implementation of a computerized maintenance management system to better understand the cost of service. The airport has recently also established an asset management strategy and a systematic approach that employs risk, strategic, and service priority for investment planning. The program was nationally recognized at PEMAC’s 2019 annual convention.

What the audience will learn

  • How to implement strategic asset management at an airport that operates in a dynamic economic environment
  • How to successfully implement a new computerized maintenance management system and gain buy-in from operational staff
  • How to take a systematic approach to capital planning that involves strategic alignment, service priority and risk
  • How to embed risk into airport infrastructure planning
  • How to strike a balance between seeking expert advice and driving change from within

13:25 - 14:30

Lunch

Your conference questionnaire will be sent to you by email today. See you at Passenger Terminal CONFERENCE 2021!

Increasing Airport Capacity

Day 3: Thursday, June 11

Increasing Airport Capacity
09:00 - 13:25

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Satyaki Raghunath
Chief strategy and development officer
Bangalore International Airport
India
Ashwini Thorat
Head Airport Planning
GVK
India

09:05

Leveraging artificial intelligence and video to drastically improve the turnaround process

Laurent Kaddouch
Project manager
Groupe ADP
France
Groupe ADP, as an airport operator, has deployed more than 1,000 video cameras covering the apron area over the last few decades. In a context where technologies based on AI are emerging and maturing, the use of cameras can be enhanced to a higher level. Meeting all the conditions, ADP has taken the opportunity to combine AI and video cameras to improve the turnaround process with the objectives of automating turnaround milestones detection, improving safety, enhancing predictability, and increasing performance. The presentation will offer an overview of the proof of concept ongoing in Groupe ADP.

What the audience will learn

  • Objectives of the POC
  • Description of the POC
  • Results of the POC

09:35

Gatwick's masterplan and future growth

Tim Norwood
Chief planning officer
Gatwick Airport
UK
Gatwick has an innovative proposal to make best use of its existing runways by bringing its Northern Runway into routine use. The presentation will discuss the development consent order process the airport is preparing, and what the future of Gatwick could look like in the next 15 years.

What the audience will learn

  • Large infrastructure projects at airports
  • Development consent order processes
  • Growth using existing infrastructure

10:05

How to balance traffic in maximum-capacity multi-terminal airports

Matt Cosker
Demand and capacity manager
Heathrow Airport
UK
Martijn Verhees
Director aviation solutions
Beontra GmbH
Germany
Heathrow is severely capacity constrained; therefore, optimizing how the limited capacity within each of the four terminals is used is key. Even minor changes to flight schedules can disturb a previously balanced terminal operation. The presentation will explain how Heathrow prepares to accommodate these changes and ensures it gets the most efficient use of its infrastructure. It will demonstrate how it is still possible to grow despite fully constrained operations.

What the audience will learn

  • How to balance traffic
  • How to deal with seasonal schedule changes
  • How to optimize terminal allocation
  • How to efficiently grow despite capacity constraints
  • Understand details about the four-terminal ops at LHR

10:35

Helsinki Airport Development Program – passenger terminal processor capacity simulation

Heikki Koski
Chief digital officer
Finavia
Finland
Piet Ringersma
Senior airport architect
NACO, Netherlands Airport Consultants
Netherlands
The most extensive expansion project in the history of Helsinki Airport is underway. Finavia’s giant investment program allows the airport to serve 30 million passengers annually. The expansion program includes an increase in terminal capacity to accommodate future growth. Successful discussion on terminal capacity between airport and airlines requires a simulation approach to discuss various terminal design layouts and what-if scenarios on different allocation strategies. The presentation will show how NACO and Finavia conducted terminal simulations for various scenarios to showcase the terminal capacity, which facilitated seamless discussion between Finavia and the airlines at Helsinki.

What the audience will learn

  • Insight into the development of Helsinki Airport Development Program
  • Challenges faced with airport capacity discussions
  • Various approaches to carry out terminal capacity assessments
  • Implementation of the terminal simulation approach
  • Understanding the terminal simulation as a tool for stakeholder discussion

11:05 - 11:25

Break

11:25

Efficient terminal development strategies for the US market

Stephen Sisneros
Managing director - airport affairs
Southwest Airlines
USA
Jonathan Massey
Managing principal
Corgan
USA
The private infrastructure development industry has been searching for ways to expand its presence in the US market for many years. However, the formulas and approaches that work in other regulatory, commercial and cultural environments can prove challenging in the US market. As the US aviation market was originally pioneered by multiple short haul domestic air carriers rather than a single state-affiliated flag carrier, the airline community plays a much greater role in how the market develops. This discussion will focus on the nuances of the US market as seen from the eyes of the largest US domestic carrier.

What the audience will learn

  • The role that airlines play in airport infrastructure development in the US market
  • What has been successful, and what has not in private airport development in the US
  • What the keys to a successful infrastructure development project in this environment are
  • What stakeholder involvement means
  • Why an airline and airport would support private airport development

11:55

Package of optimization projects to increase capacity and efficiency @PRG

Martin Kučera
Executive director airport operations
Prague Airport
Czech Republic
In the last couple of years, Prague Airport has gone through huge traffic growth and has faced many challenges to react to the increasing operational demands while retaining the high passenger experience and punctuality. This paper will show a package of projects with the goal of increasing capacity and operational efficiency at the airport, which allows the increasing traffic demand on existing infrastructure to be accommodated. This capacity and efficiency increase is not driven just by construction activities (e.g. additional check-in counters, larger security or border control, apron reconfiguration), but also by optimization of planning and implementation of self-service technologies.

What the audience will learn

  • Increase in capacity and operational efficiency
  • Higher utilization of existing airport infrastructure
  • Seamless passenger flow and excellent passenger experience

12:25

The journey to 400 passengers per hour per security lane

Willem van Bavel
Managing director
Bavel Consulting
Ireland
Global passenger volumes are increasing each year and are forecast to double by 2035 (IATA, 2016-2035). As a result, security checkpoints are becoming capacity-constrained bottlenecks in the passenger journey. This can lead to costly expansion programs to make space for additional lanes, often at the cost of sacrificing valuable retail space. However, most checkpoints operate at only half of their available capacity. This presentation puts a spotlight on the common security lane inefficiencies and introduces a methodology to overcome them. Is a 400-passengers-per-hour lane achievable and if so, at what cost? We answer these questions.

What the audience will learn

  • Understand how to reduce wait time and security operating costs
  • Learn the common bottlenecks and inefficiencies at security lanes and identify the hidden keys that unlock capacity
  • Introduce a methodology to overcome bottlenecks and increase security lane throughput by 30%-40%
  • Understand the key ways in which people need to change their ways of working in security to enable throughput increases

12:55

A dynamic perspective on aviation capacity – what drives the capacity

Geert Boosten
Lector aviation management
Amsterdam University of Applied Science
Netherlands
Dr Catya Zuniga
Associate professor
Amsterdam University of Applied Science
Netherlands
This work presents a framework to define and measure capacity on different time horizons while identifying the different main stakeholders involved, their interaction and role, using three main drivers. Technological and societal constraints define the available capacity per time unit (hour, day, year). Airline, airport or ATC business models reflect how users try to optimize the available capacity. The main drivers provide insight into the dynamic use of airport capacity; the fact that individual stakeholder decision making could have a major impact on airport capacity and how the available capacity will be incorporated in scheduling, tactical planning and daily operations.

What the audience will learn

  • Highlight the main planning phases per stakeholder, common objectives, most relevant discrepancies and their impact on available capacity
  • Describe the benefits of 'simple' and realistic models vs. the consequences of non-realistic 'fancy' models
  • Contrast academic vs. practitioners planning on capacity, its definitions and applicability. The runway isn’t always the bottleneck
  • Present an innovative capacity definition framework which is applicable to different time horizon planning phases and capturing the inherent stochastic & dynamic nature of capacity
  • Exemplify the capacity definition on two case studies: Amsterdam Schiphol Airport and Mexico city airport

13:25 - 14:30

Lunch

Your conference questionnaire will be sent to you by email today. See you at Passenger Terminal CONFERENCE 2021!

Safety, Crisis & Disaster Management

Day 3: Thursday, June 11

Safety, Crisis & Disaster Management
09:00 - 13:25

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Alaistair Deacon
Airport operational systems consultant
Toasty Solutions Limited
UK
Velissarios Eleftheriou
CEO
TotalCDM
Greece

09:05

Development of Narita Airport's crisis management – after the typhoons

Mamika Katagiri
Assistant
Narita International Airport Corporation
Japan
No two disasters are the same, and their condition changes every moment. That’s why we have to prepare and be ready for any crisis situation. We will explain the recent case where we were able to carry out a better airport operation by examining the problems arising from the previous disaster response experience and taking countermeasures. Due to the impact of Typhoon Faxai in September 2019, a large number of passengers were stranded at the airport. This presentation will share Narita Airport’s countermeasures for Typhoon Hagibis, which landed in Japan just a month after Typhoon Faxai.

What the audience will learn

  • The extent of disaster damage that airport operators must assume
  • The importance of speedy responses
  • The necessity of getting all stakeholders involved

09:35

Coronavirus – lessons learned so far

Dr Walter Gaber
Senior vice president
Fraport AG
Germany
The coronavirus outbreak has had a considerable impact on national and international airports and airlines. In close cooperation with the aviation industry, the goal is to keep the airport running and still fulfill national and international requirements. This presentation will cover risk communications, cooperation between airports, airlines and public health agencies and lessons learned, along with some measures that are being put in place at airports around the world to minimize the risk of the virus spreading.

What the audience will learn

  • Risk communication
  • Cooperation with airlines and public health agencies
  • Lessons learned

10:05

Managing the airport during civil protests

Allan Padilla
Chief operations officer
Quiport
Ecuador
During October the Government of Ecuador announced the elimination of the fuel subsidies for the whole country. At the beginning, all public transport stopped operating as a protest to the government, blocking the roads and access to the airport. Later, indigenous groups from all over the country joined a national protest that ended 12 days later. Access roads, flight cancelations, logistics and airport cargo were affected.

What the audience will learn

  • Coordination with stakeholders to confront the crisis
  • Manage great communications through all media on how the airport is running
  • Implement an effective contingency plan
  • Work with government entities to assure continuity of operations
  • Preparing to get back to normal operations

10:35

Communicating with passengers and employees during emergencies

Michael Nonnemacher
Aviation chief operating officer
Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport
USA
The speaker has been directly involved in a passenger aircraft accident, a cargo aircraft accident and a shooting at a passenger terminal. As a result, he has real-life experience of responding to these emergencies and lessons learned about communicating with passengers and employees during emergencies. He has also developed employee training programs for how to communicate and help during emergencies. He will share his experience during this presentation.

What the audience will learn

  • How to better communicate with airport passengers and employees
  • Technologies and best practices for communicating during emergencies
  • The audience will see clips of the KFLL employee emergency training program

11:05 - 11:25

Break

11:25

A simple process to improve safety in complex operational areas

Lyn Fowler
Baggage transformation manager
Heathrow Airport
UK
Chris Penny
Senior people and change consultant (operations consulting)
Arup
UK
Safety issues are often systemic in nature, yet many interventions focus on a single symptom. This is often due to the complex nature of operational areas, where multiple stakeholders interact around a single function. How do airports create a holistic view of safety? We describe the development of a local safety framework, which creates a common language to coordinate activities. This framework was used to underpin a simple process for capturing feedback on the workforce's feelings – "how safe do you feel on your shift?" We detail our trial of the new proactive measures and processes and our lessons learned.

What the audience will learn

  • Typical operational areas are complex as a result of the interdependencies among various actors (e.g. airport, airline, ground handlers)
  • As a consequence of this complexity, safety issues often emerge from a network of smaller factors interacting
  • Creating a feedback loop between the various actors in an operational system can produce systemic responses to safety issues
  • An effective approach to safety requires a holistic (i.e. systems-based) view

11:55

Full-scale emergency exercise: a toolkit toward efficient disaster management

Koen Hillewaert
Head of contingency
Brussels Airport Company
Belgium
After a brief description of the Brussels Airport specifics, the presenter will focus on a risk analysis of the airport and for which emergencies and business continuity scenarios Brussels Airport is prepared. The presentation will also discuss how to get airport staff and stakeholders educated and trained to deal with a real emergency, and how to establish a robust training program. Finally, a case study of a full-scale emergency exercise will be presented, showing real footage, lessons learned and dos and don’ts.

What the audience will learn

  • Which emergencies an airport has to be prepared for
  • Full-scale emergency exercises: dos and don’ts
  • Crisis management training challenges

12:25 - 13:25

Panel Discussion: Who’s crying now: the fundamentals of crisis management

Airports are subject to a range of natural and man-made disasters that can quickly spiral into crisis situations. Be it ash clouds from a volcanic eruption, drones on the perimeter or a ransomware cyber-attack, the possibility of a crisis in airports is always at hand. This session explores fundamental issues critical to any crisis management program. It will facilitate the audit and benchmarking of current mitigation, response and recovery practices and help to identify corrective measures. Grounded in global case studies and best practices, this session will give participants insights into the management of a crisis and an opportunity to explore options.

What the audience will learn

  • How crisis situations differ from standard incidents, routine emergencies and major incidents
  • The main causes of crisis management failure
  • The essential elements of crisis management decision making
  • The benefit of information management in crisis management
  • The availability of resources and training to help better prepare staff dealing with crisis situations
Wendy Reiter
Director aviation security
Port of Seattle
USA
Andrew Velasquez III
Managing deputy commissioner and chief operations and security officer
City of Chicago, Department of Aviation
USA
Dr David Rubens
Executive director
Institute of Strategic Risk Management
UK
Panel Moderator:
Donald Zoufal, lecturer / consultant, University of Chicago / CrowZnest Consulting Inc

13:25 - 14:30

Lunch

Your conference questionnaire will be sent to you by email today. See you at Passenger Terminal CONFERENCE 2021!

Technovation: Baggage, Systems & Integration (Continued)

Day 3: Thursday, June 11

Technovation: Baggage, Systems & Integration
09:00 - 13:25

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Maurice Jenkins
Division director, information systems
Miami Dade Aviation Department
USA
Al Lyons
SVP firmwide director of IT & electronic systems
HOK
USA

09:05

The ideal baggage handling system of the future

Mark Birkebak
Director of engineering
Greater Orlando Aviation Authority
USA
Juan Carlos Arteaga
Vice president
HNTB Corporation
USA
Baggage handling systems (BHS) are critical to successful and efficient airport operations. Selection of proper BHS technology that will provide the most reliable, efficient and secure conveyance of bags is an absolute necessity. And ensuring that the design, construction, operations and maintenance will fully satisfy the airport’s needs must be carefully orchestrated. Orlando’s growth has dramatically exceeded forecasts. To meet demand, GOAA began a public procurement protocol in 2015 to select the design, construction and manufacturing team for an RFID (aka ICS) BHS system, which provides 100% tracking, eliminates international and domestic bag separation, minimizes jams and improves hygiene.

What the audience will learn

  • The right process of selecting the ideal DBOM team
  • The technical aspects of preparing the design criteria package to ensure participation of all qualified potential bidders
  • The most important aspects of a robust, reliable and efficient BHS
  • The best methodology to design, procure, install and maintain an efficient BHS
  • Lessons learned on the key success factors to deliver a BHS in a collaborative, integrated approach among all stakeholders

09:35

Upgrading Paris airports to ECAC EDS Standard 3

Emmanuel Lefevre
BHS project director
Groupe ADP
France
All European hold baggage screening should be upgraded to Standard 3-approved explosives detection systems by September 2022 at the latest. Thus Groupe ADP is currently redesigning and reconfiguring CDG and ORY baggage handling systems under French and European authorities surveillance. In the end, more than 100 EDS will be installed for a total investment of €500m. This challenging upgrade has to be conducted under running operation and in conjunction with other passenger terminal revamping projects. As such, special attention is paid to the heart of the SkyTeam Hub, which handles more than 70,000 bags per day.

What the audience will learn

  • Security is priceless
  • Working jointly with authorities is crucial
  • Exogenous constraints cannot be ignored
  • BHS are hard to regulate and sensitive to interventions
  • Anticipation is the key

10:05

The next generation of automated baggage handling systems

Daniel Agostino
Assistant director, operations
Miami International Airport
USA
The presentation will explore the integration of a new fully automated baggage handling system that consists of a new facility with CTX 9800 EDS machines and mobile inspection tables (MIT) inside the CBRA room. The discussion will dive deeply into operational constraints associated with the transition from an outdated system and standalone EDS operation into the new fully automated system. The presentation will describe from the airport perspective how to properly plan, including getting airline buy-in, and how to work with federal partners and other stakeholders including ground handlers, while still operating in the old environment.

What the audience will learn

  • How to achieve the perfect balance between technology and human capabilities to increase efficiency
  • How to bring all airport stakeholders to the table to guarantee successful results
  • How to streamline data received from the baggage handling system for useful metrics
  • Why baggage hygiene is the core of all baggage handling systems

10:35

Increasing reliability at Schiphol baggage handling

Ronald Wever
Cluster manager baggage systems
Amsterdam Airport Schiphol
Netherlands
An increasing number of passengers are taking to the skies every year, and airports need to adapt to cope. A significant barrier to increased passenger capacity is the limits of the baggage handling systems. Many airports cannot expand the physical capacity of their baggage systems, and therefore need to increase capacity through increased reliability. Schiphol is using smart condition monitoring to alert the maintenance team to baggage conveyor faults up to four months in advance of a breakdown – helping to improve the reliability of the baggage systems and increase the passenger capacity of the airport.

What the audience will learn

  • How to switch from preventive to predictive maintenance
  • How to increase baggage handling capacity within your existing system
  • How to optimize your maintenance organization
  • The ease of installing smart asset monitoring sensors
  • How predictive maintenance reduces energy consumption by creating a digital twin

11:05 - 11:25

Break

11:25

Co-designing a gate managing tool with business

Yorick Buys
Service manager - passenger services
Brussels Airport Company
Belgium
The presentation will introduce a tool to lower the workload at a gate and make managing a gate easier and more straightforward. The tool has been designed together with airlines and handlers using a very fast and agile approach. It has considerably reduced the workload at a gate.

What the audience will learn

  • Gate management
  • Agile development
  • Co-designing with business

11:55

Using RFID technology to improve baggage management

Nicolas Pierre-Pierre
Project manager - RFID deployment at CDG
Groupe ADP
France
The ADP group, as well as Hub One, has been working for a few years on the deployment of RFID technology to improve the traceability of baggage at CDG Airport, in order to meet an ever-increasing need for information. All the sorters at T2E are equipped with this technology, as well as the sorters dedicated to Skyteam rapid connection. Deployment will continue on arrival carousels to enhance service quality. The rest of the platform will be equipped over the coming years, making CDG one of the leading European airports in the use of this identification technology.

What the audience will learn

  • Increase read rate performance of baggage
  • New opportunities for information to passengers
  • Disaster recovery with RFID

12:25

The future of hand luggage: from pain to gain – invisibly

Vicky Scherber
Head of passenger and baggage processes
Lufthansa Group
Germany
Dr Torsten Wingenter
Founder
Aviation Catalysts
Germany
One of the biggest challenges today (no. 3 by IATA for airports) is hand luggage, which causes flight delays by slowing down processes from security to boarding. What if we could automatically detect the amount and measure the size of hand luggage? Invisible to the passenger and in a seamless walk-through process, without creating a new touchpoint. In a perfect world, everyone carries only as much hand luggage as allowed. But there are times when things don’t work out as planned. Wouldn’t passengers be happier if there was more flexibility; if they could take (even additional) important hand luggage on board while unimportant pieces stay out?

What the audience will learn

  • How to solve the hand luggage struggle for airports and airlines in general with unseen but working approaches with existing infrastructure
  • How fresh new ideas convert pain into gain and create a win-win-win for airports, airlines and passengers
  • How to remove delays with hand luggage, optimize processes (shorter waiting times) and increase the overall customer experience (including incentivizing behavior)
  • How a whole new thinking of the 'underestimated' hand luggage creates new dynamic personal services bringing ancillary revenues while reducing costs
  • How to disrupt/solve long-term pains with new technologies while using existing infrastructure and processes instead of starting from scratch

12:55

Baggage handling system simulation tool

Abdul Hadi Osman
Assistant manager
Changi Airport Group (Singapore) Pte Ltd
Singapore
Eric Miller
Director
BNP Associates Inc
USA
The presentation will introduce a multifaceted simulation tool for the baggage handling system at Changi International Airport. It allows a range of users from planners to operation teams to understand how the baggage handling system copes with different flight load and schedule changes. This is all done in 30 minutes with graphs and tabular results for analysis.

What the audience will learn

  • Ease of use of simulation tool
  • Flexibility of data adoption of tool for simulation
  • Simulation to understand your system constraints and assist in operation planning
  • Operation analysis
  • Operation planning

13:25 - 14:30

Lunch

Your conference questionnaire will be sent to you by email today. See you at Passenger Terminal CONFERENCE 2021!

Aging Population & PRMs

Day 3: Thursday, June 11

Aging Population & PRMs
09:00 - 13:25

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Geraldine Lundy
Director
Accessible Travel Consultancy Ltd
UK
Roberto Castiglioni
Director
Reduced Mobility Rights Limited
UK

09:05

Disrupting the traditional way WCHC passengers fly

Josh Wintersgill
Founder and director
easyTravelseat
UK
For too long, WCHC passengers have had to put up with the undignified, uncomfortable and embarrassing process of having to be manually handled in order to access an aircraft, not to mention the strain on the operational staff. The need to be physically grabbed under the arms and legs, the need to sit on an unsuitable aisle chair, the severe lack of appropriate transferring equipment at the majority of airports across the globe to facilitate a safer, more dignified and comfortable experience is still very disappointing. The easyTravelseat enhances the WCHC passengers' experience and improves operational performance.

What the audience will learn

  • What the easyTravelseat is and how it works
  • The severe lack of transferring equipment in place at airports
  • Why easyTravelseat is important to special assistance providers and airlines both operationally and for positive passenger experience

09:35

Giving confidence to passengers with a disability

Graham Race
Accessible aviation lead
Queen Elizabeth's Foundation for Disabled People
UK
Every year in the UK, tens of thousands of people with disabilities travel through airports and fly with airlines. However, only a tiny proportion know assistance is available or feel comfortable asking for it. Airports can be challenging environments both physically and mentally. Many people simply decide not to travel. To deny people that opportunity, however unintentionally, is not right. Nor is it good for an airport’s revenue line. We'll share the findings from a unique in-depth research study of people with disabilities: what they expect, need, want and hope for that will give them confidence in traveling.

What the audience will learn

  • How disabled passengers feel at each stage of their journey and what they wish airport employees would know and do
  • Specific insights about what it’s like to be a passenger with autism, dementia or a colostomy
  • What these groups and their traveling companions expect from airports and what their ideal experience would be
  • Why it’s important to an airport’s commercial key metrics
  • How to train your employees to be more empathetic and give them the tools and information they need

10:05

UK airline accessibility framework

James Fremantle
Manager, consumer policy and enforcement
UK Civil Aviation Authority
UK
The UK CAA has undertaken a wide-ranging review of the accessibility of airlines operating to and from the UK. It has reviewed the accessibility of booking procedures, check-in and boarding processes, and facilities and services on board aircraft. The review has assessed the current level of compliance with applicable legislation, as well as noting best practice. The CAA now plans to develop a framework designed to deliver improvements in airline accessibility. This will complement its airport accessibility framework which has been in place since 2014.

What the audience will learn

  • The CAA's role in terms of enforcing accessibility regulations
  • The current levels of accessibility for airlines flying from the UK
  • Sharing best practice in terms of accessibility for flights from the UK
  • Future CAA work to improve accessibility for passengers

10:35

EU legislation on the rights of passengers with reduced mobility

Andras Mogyoro
Legal officer
European Commission
Belgium
This presentation will outline the European Commission's current activities related to the rights of PRM. This will include the ongoing evaluation of Regulation (EC) 1107/2006 and the revision of the interpretative guidelines of the same regulation.

What the audience will learn

  • The European Commission is currently evaluating the regulation on the rights of PRM when traveling by air
  • Stakeholders (airports, airlines, etc) have the possibility to participate in an open public consultation that will be ongoing in April
  • In addition, stakeholders can participate in a targeted consultation (this will start around April)
  • Explain the main novelties proposed by the European Commission for the revision of the interpretative guidelines on Regulation (EC) 1107/2006
  • Explanation of how participants can give their opinions on the revision of the interpretative guidelines

11:05 - 11:25

Break

Workshop: Going beyond the current model of wheelchair assistance

Year-on-year growth of wheelchair assistance requests is stretching airport assistance services across the globe beyond capacity. Recent trials suggest that a significant share of passengers who currently request wheelchair assistance would prefer to get alternative types of assistance. This workshop will enable attendees to explore the sector’s current state of play and recent studies, discuss which viable alternatives can be implemented in the short term, and identify long-term solutions that will shape a better and more cost-effective model of wheelchair assistance.

11:25

Wheelchair assistance at airports – the passenger's perspective

Laurel Van Horn
VP director of programs
Open Doors Organization
USA
At large airports in the USA and Europe, more than one million passengers per year request assistance with mobility or navigation. Regardless of their specific needs, most are offered 'one-size-fits-all' wheelchair service and are left feeling more like a parcel than a valued customer. This presentation will examine the experience from the customer's perspective, with analysis based on findings from ACRP Report 210: Innovative Solutions to Facilitate Accessibility for Airport Travelers with Disabilities.

What the audience will learn

  • What travelers with disabilities need and want
  • Industry best-practice solutions to better meet those needs
  • Ways in which airports and airlines can help passengers be more self-reliant
  • Importance of pre-trip information and communication
  • Importance of service differentiation

11:35

Wheelchair assistance at airports

Celine Canu
Head of aviation facilitation
IATA
Canada
The presentation will review findings from experts from airlines, airports, regulators, travel agents and disabled associations to analyze the complexity of handling the special category of customers who need assistance at the airport.

What the audience will learn

  • Identifying the issue
  • Sharing practical experiences from the stakeholders
  • Promoting a culture of collaboration and customer service

11:45

How real-time data improves PRM passenger flow

William L Neece
Director of airport solutions
Ozion
France
Service operations for passengers with reduced mobility are evolving. Every year, overall passenger volumes appear to rise, as does the expectation of service. In this session we will explore how the use of good data and collaboration can improve service for passengers with reduced mobility today, and prepare for the increasing numbers of tomorrow. Airlines, airports and service providers all contribute valuable data and now have access to that combined real-time passenger operational information. We will show how this allows for the securing of each passenger, on-time flight performance and smooth overall airport operation.

What the audience will learn

  • How data and collaboration can improve service for passengers with reduced mobility
  • How optimizing resources can lead to increased passenger and employee satisfaction
  • How SSR codes and airline notifications can be used most effectively
  • How a complete view of the service benefits the airline, airport and service provider
  • How putting the passenger at the center of the service serves the entire operation

Workshop

13:25 - 14:30

Lunch

Your conference questionnaire will be sent to you by email today. See you at Passenger Terminal CONFERENCE 2021!

Airport Cities, Transport Connections & Regions

Day 1: Tuesday, June 9

Airport Cities, Transport Connections & Regions
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chair

Léa Bodossian
Managing partner
Airspire
Belgium

09:05

Airport City Manchester: a comparison with airport cities around the globe

Dr Viktoriia Myroniuk
Program leader in BEng/MEng Aeronautical Engineering
Salford University Manchester
UK
The presentation will discuss and analyze the main characteristics, pros and cons of airport cities around the globe. Characteristics of Airport City Manchester will be outlined and analyzed. Greater Manchester Ground Strategy 2040 and its importance for Airport City Manchester will be described.

What the audience will learn

  • The main characteristics, pros and cons of airport cities around the globe
  • Characteristics of Airport City Manchester
  • Airport City Manchester and Greater Manchester Ground Strategy 2040

09:35

Keys to developing a successful airport city

Geoff Herdman
Director, real estate and investment attraction
Edmonton Airports
Canada
We will consider the primary failures in developing an airport city and explore tactics to avoid these mistakes through proactive planning and change management of internal processes and culture at airports. An examination of airport organizational culture in the context of real estate development will provide suggestions for how to create a supportive climate for the sales and property development team at your airport, designed to enable successful development of an airport city.

What the audience will learn

  • Tactics to drive and sustain the development of an airport city
  • How to create a culture and climate that support the development of an airport city
  • Keys to change management in an airport context
  • Smart planning for airport city development

10:05

Beijing new aerotropolis – new power engine for Beijing

Carol Zhang
Project manager
Beijing New Aerotropolis Holdings Co Ltd [via live uplink]
China
The presentation will introduce Beijing Daxing International Airport and the surrounding economic zone, and the philosophies behind the urban design of the BDIA Economic Zone (Beijing part), which was awarded platinum level of LEED for Cities. It will also discuss the investment opportunities at the current stage and some preferential policies such as the Free Trade Area since BDIAEZ is the only FTA in Beijing.

What the audience will learn

  • Introduction to Beijing Daxing International Airport and BDIA Economic Zone
  • Philosophies behind BDIAEZ urban planning (Beijing part)
  • Investment opportunities (four projects)
  • Preferential policies

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

King Shaka International Airport and the Durban Aerotropolis development

Terence Delomoney
General manager - King Shaka International Airport
Airports Company South Africa
South Africa
The presentation will discuss the development of an effective aerotropolis with innovative and collaborative partnerships between the airport and key business stakeholders of Durban and the region.

What the audience will learn

  • Collaborative partnerships
  • Economic benefits
  • Challenges and solutions

11:25

HKIA is moving toward an airport city

Steven Yiu
Deputy director, service delivery
Airport Authority Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Today’s airports are not only facilities for managing passengers and cargo, but also incubators that help wider networks of interrelated activities and businesses thrive. Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) has embarked on a transformation from a city airport into an airport city, which will integrate the airport with many of its surrounding entities, turning it into something much bigger than just an airport.

What the audience will learn

  • How HKIA has prepared itself for growth and is striving for breakthroughs
  • Introduction to HKIA’s current and future developments
  • How HKIA has expanded its market catchment to the Greater Bay Area

11:55 - 13:15

Lunch

13:15

Solidarity Hub – a new-generation airport

Marek Litwin
Director planning and strategy
Solidarity Transport Hub Poland
Poland
Malgorzata Poplawska
Airport planning manager
Solidarity Transport Hub Poland
Poland
Solidarity Transport Hub is a greenfield airport project in the heart of Europe. With an initial capacity of 45 million ppa, two runways, an airport city and full intermodal connectivity, it has an ambition to be a game-changer when it comes to travel experience. So, what is the basis of the claims that it will "rank among the world's top 10 airports", offer "the lowest possible costs of construction and operation" and "redesign the airport experience"? The speakers, in a verbal duel, will present the concept of a new airport and provide insight into the processes that shape it.

What the audience will learn

  • Overview of the concept of the new airport and the context of the decision to launch this project
  • The main strategic assumptions about the new airport – infrastructure and processes
  • How we plan to translate our ambitions and strategy into processes and workflows and why they will succeed
  • The risks and challenges of a greenfield project of this size and ambition, and how to manage them
  • What it means to be one of the top 10 airports and what a next-generation airport is

13:45

LEED for Cities and Communities certification for airports and aerotropolises

Jeff Denno
Senior project manager, sustainability
Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport
USA
Dr Daniele Guglielmino
Senior sustainability specialist - cities and communities
GBCI Europe
Italy
Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, the world’s busiest and most efficient airport, is the first airport in the world to be awarded LEED for Cities and Communities certification. Concurrently, Beijing Daxing International Airport Area became the first aerotropolis in the world to be awarded the same certification. This discussion will explore how this platform has supported the planning efforts and operational decision making at each of these communities; and where the intersection of these data sets can drive positive, people-focused, economic growth to prepare for the rapidly changing landscape of the aviation industry.

What the audience will learn

  • An understanding of the framework of LEED for Cities and Communities within the context of an airport and aerotropolis
  • The tools needed to create a roadmap to LEED for Cities and Communities certification within a multifaceted entity
  • How to use the platform as a mechanism to develop, support, and capture the successes of sustainability programming and policies

14:15

Smart Airport City 2.0: an amazing, lively hub

Hubert Fontanel
Real estate deputy director
Groupe ADP
France
Groupe ADP designs airport cities that generate value for airports and airport areas, in order to offer end users a unique experience, directly linked to the world. Inside new-generation airport cities, employees – just like partners, clients, suppliers and passengers – will be able to meet, exchange, relax, enjoy retail and diversified services meant to offer an unforgettable experience, source of well-being and serenity.

What the audience will learn

  • Airport cities as added-value generators
  • Create a unique experience for airport city end users
  • Imagine a new range of quality services enabling real exchanges, well-being and serenity for airport city end users

14:45

Developing a smart airport within a smart city

Neil Pakey
Chief executive officer
Nieuport Aviation, owner and operator of Toronto City Airport Passenger Terminal
Canada
Historically, city-center airports have been politically challenging. More recently, city-center airports have been valued as they connect people, businesses and cities in a fast and efficient manner. They are also highly contributing economic engines for cities and local economies. Traditionally, airports were not designed and operated to fit in an urban context. Emerging technologies have the opportunity to change the way future airports are developed and operated, and reduce their impact on the environment. Leveraging technological advancements in the aviation sector will go a long way to developing smart city-center gateways that can coexist with smart cities in a friendly manner.

What the audience will learn

  • Opportunities and challenges of a city-center airport
  • How do city airports coexist within the community and urban context?
  • How can we influence the political views of a city airport?
  • City-center airport as a key link to the city transportation system
  • The upgrade that provides city-center passengers with a unique experience

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30

London’s airport growth: securing the transport connectivity and capacity

Shamal Ratnayaka
Aviation strategy lead
Transport for London
UK
Every London airport is seeking to grow. This presentation will set out what needs to be done to ensure that the needs of airport passengers, staff and freight can be accommodated, mindful of environmental obligations and without being at the expense of non-airport trips. It will look at the steps London is taking to change travel behavior and what that means for the airports serving the city and the part they can play.

What the audience will learn

  • How to meet the transport needs of the airport alongside the needs of the city
  • Initiatives with the potential to shift trips to sustainable modes
  • How airports can align with the wider city policy and planning context

16:00

Integrated transport thinking is key to sustainable airport growth

Alex Kirkwood
Partner
Weston Williamson + Partners
UK
Passenger numbers at East Midlands Airport (EMA) are forecast to increase from 5 to 10 MAP over the next 20 years, but current reliance on road connectivity places a severe constraint on expansion plans. Our vision proposal for a rail link service to the airport will enable EMA to grow while addressing key environmental challenges. It connects the airport to the cities of Derby, Nottingham, Leicester and HS2 East Midlands Hub and utilizes existing spare capacity in Network Rail infrastructure. We explore the wider economic drivers and opportunities for regional growth facilitated through investment in transport infrastructure and transport-oriented development.

What the audience will learn

  • The strategic importance of East Midlands Airport as a catalyst for regional development
  • The importance of an efficient and environmentally sustainable surface access strategy including rail connectivity
  • Details of the proposed rail line connecting EMA to Derby, Nottingham, Leicester, East Midlands Parkway and suburban stations
  • How improved east-west regional connectivity will optimize the benefits of HS2 in the Midlands
  • Plans for a new station and ground transportation center at EMA

16:30 - 17:30

Panel Discussion: Urban Turbine Research Project

Airports have become a vital part of contemporary society. They have turned from infrastructure knots to multipurpose urban centers. Yet they are physically separated from city centers, often unnecessarily disconnected. The Urban Turbine Research Project is connecting airport owners and operators with academics and leading industry experts in an unprecedented attempt to overcome traditional boundaries. The pool-funded research engages intrinsically connected stakeholders, fostering the future model of innovative connectivity and addressing opportunities using technology to shrink the infrastructure footprint, reduce the environmental impact and improve the quality of life for passengers and citizens alike.

What the audience will learn

  • Airport visioning, broken down into manageable stages, zooming out and in to the detail of future airport planning
  • Best practice of collaboration between industry and academia, providing future airport management capabilities and personnel
  • Airport urban planning, turning airports into people-centric, attractive and best-connected urban places, focused on sustainability and well-being
  • Passenger processing revisited from home to gate, starting the process afresh, overcoming airline-driven terminal design practice
  • Airport governance, integrated airport, city and airport access management, Airport Collaborative Decision Making
Rudolf Lipold
Executive director
Salzburger Flughafen GmbH
Austria
Ashwini Thorat
Head Airport Planning
GVK
India
Paul Beck
Managing director
Planeground Airport Consulting
Germany
Max Schintlmeister
Managing director
Airport Excellence SL
Spain
Panel Moderator:
Henrik Rothe, senior lecturer, head of Urban Turbine Research Project, Cranfield University

Opening Day Party – hosted by Groupe ADP – Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Day 2: Wednesday, June 10

Airport Cities, Transport Connections & Regions
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chair

Léa Bodossian
Managing partner
Airspire
Belgium

09:05

Regional connectivity scheme, with a particular focus on India

Nandita Bhatt
Joint general manager architect
Airports Authority of India, Indian Aviation Academy
India
As the Indian economy grows, consumption-led growth in populated metros is expected to spill over to hinterland areas. This is also expected to be due to production becoming more expensive in the densely populated metro cities. In this scenario, air connectivity can provide the required impetus to the economic growth of regional centers. In this context, one of the key objectives of NCAP 2016 is to 'establish an integrated ecosystem that will lead to significant growth of the civil aviation sector'.

What the audience will learn

  • Geographical spread: how the vast country is connecting various regions
  • Collaborations: government, state governments, operators and airlines
  • Giving new meaning to air connectivity; minimum cost
  • Resource management: using existing airstrips; upgrading or revival
  • Employment generator

09:35

How a region can positively affect local airport development

Marja Aalto
Director air transportation development
Business Tampere Oy
Finland
It's difficult to get airlines to commit to flight operations in remote areas of Europe. When the market is closed, the location is far away, and your region is unknown by airlines and tour operators, and when there are only a few airlines operating from your airport – is there a way to make you known to the world? This presentation showcases how a small region can take matters into its own hands and raise the awareness of its existence. With succesful marketing and development work, Tampere region has gone from being a hidden and unknown place to a known opportunity for new companies.

What the audience will learn

  • How a region can be a key operator in air transportation development work
  • The power of collaboration by regional companies when the working budget is low
  • How to market your regional industry and city development into a successful and accessible destination
  • How to connect local interest groups to support you and work together towards the same target
  • The power of visibility and strength in numbers internationally despite being small and unknown

10:05

Air-rail link transport-oriented development: the Green Way

Julianna Moats
Principal engineer
WSP
UK
The Green Way, a new rail link to Heathrow Airport, blends sustainable airport access with sustainable job and housing growth in the west of London, using new connectivity to spur transport-oriented development. This presentation will detail the design evolution, the public-private joint working practices, the political engagement requirements, and advice for other air-rail schemes to enhance business cases and political appeal.

What the audience will learn

  • Air-rail link design for transport-oriented development
  • Public-private joint working practices
  • Political engagement process for air-rail schemes in the UK

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

An innovative Learning Lab at the center of CDG Airport

Elisabeth Le Masson
Delegate for economic development and job creation
Groupe ADP
France
The companies of the airport area have difficulty recruiting employees trained in the basic skills required for working in an international, customer-focused and increasingly digitized environment. Employees have to adapt to organizational and technological changes. Paradoxically, the training organizations in the airport area often face not fully booked training sessions. In addition, some students stop the training session before the end or struggle with traditional learning methods. The Learning Lab will be an ecosystem of experimentation and innovation on new forms of work and collaborative learning at the heart of CDG Airport.

What the audience will learn

  • The challenge for companies: find the required and most needed skills
  • The challenge for training organizations: recruit and motivate the students
  • What the Learning Lab will be

11:25

Reducing airports' property tax bills

Mike Brown
Honorary Research Fellow Imperial College London
Strategic Advice for Great Airports
Canada
Most airports pay taxes or business rates to local municipalities or make payments in lieu. Negotiations over these payments can often be described as 'vigorous'. What most airports fail to realize is that their investment in airport infrastructure and in building connectivity capitalizes the value of commercial properties off-airport, even at smaller airports and at a considerable distance from the airport. This value uplift benefits the municipality and should be considered a credit to the airport’s account. At the very least, this uplift allows municipalities to fund additional programs and investments, which should be highlighted in the airport’s economic impact assessments.

What the audience will learn

  • How airports affect commercial property values around them, with examples from Canada and the UK
  • How this beneficial uplift manifests itself in increased tax revenues for the host municipality
  • How the beneficial uplift occurs at large and small airports

11:55 - 12:40

Panel Discussion: Territorial impacts on the airport of tomorrow

What are the challenges and opportunities that local authorities and communities will bring to the airport of tomorrow? Exploring the interconnection between land use planning, environmental concerns and airport growth, looking at the next decades, how is the role of local actors changing the face of airport areas?

What the audience will learn

  • The role local authorities play in airport development
  • Citizen concerns – are they always heard?
  • How do communities perceive airport growth?
  • Best practices from local authorities in terms of land use planning in airport areas
  • Best practices in working together: local authorities and airports
Johanna Rajala
District architect Aviapolis
City of Vantaa
Finland
Bernadette Quinn
Senior executive planner
Fingal County Council
Ireland
Alexandre Pueyo
Departmental councillor - Cergy 2
Cergy
France
Joachim Wempe
Managing partner
GeräuscheRechner
Germany
Panel Moderator:
Marius Nicolescu, secretary general, Airport Regions Conference

12:40 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

CONNECT | EVOLVED – a skyport for the city

John Trupiano
Principal
Corgan
USA
After the Uber Mega Skyport concept – CONNECT – was introduced, the designers were asked to apply what they learned from developing a solution for major episodic events to a scaled-down version appropriate for the urban environment. CONNECT | EVOLVED approaches air mobility on an urban scale with a solution that can easily be placed into the existing community framework. It explores the dynamics of a newly constructed Skyport as well as how to adapt the solution to repurpose existing infrastructure in the urban core.

What the audience will learn

  • Development of urban skyport operations, capacity and scalability
  • How the skyport connects the city
  • Importance of modularity and a kit of parts to facilitate speed to market
  • Enhancements to the community and social infrastructure
  • How to repurpose and extend the life of existing infrastructure

14:15 - 15:15

Panel Discussion: Urban air mobility: arriving soon at your airport

Urban air mobility is an emerging technology anticipated to see rapid growth in the coming decades, providing new connectivity between airports and cities. This panel will explore the topic of integrating UAM services into airports, covering requirements for infrastructure, aircraft and passenger operations and airspace requirements. A key integration aspect will focus on the essential collaboration between the main system partners: aircraft manufacturers, operators, airports and ATC. Taking the experience of the panelists from undertakings in the USA, Australia and Germany, the panel will discuss the approach to making a success of eVTOL operation and integration in the airports.

What the audience will learn

  • How to establish and integrate a quality passenger service and experience
  • What are the regulatory challenges?
  • Who are the main parties to be involved?
  • What are the infrastructure and aircraft handling challenges?
  • How can UAM operations be integrated into the airport’s airspace and ATC?
Jens Grabeleu
Vice president information management
Fraport AG
Germany
Ansgar Sickert
Liaison to EASA
Fraport AG
Belgium
Andre Biestmann
Director airspace and ANS support
DFS Deutsche Flugsicherung GmbH
Germany
Jörn Jaeger
Head of airspace integration and infrastructure
Volocopter GmbH
Germany
Panel Moderator:
Paul Hermans, senior airport planner, Arup

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30

How emerging new mobilities will revolutionize air transport and cities

Manuel Chaufrein
CEO and founder
Avairx
France
Through an analysis of airport areas sustainable development goals, we will analyze how emerging transport systems and new mobilities represent new challenges and offer fantastic opportunities that airport managers may seize to support their growth and develop new business.

What the audience will learn

  • Airport areas future mobility and renewable energy panorama
  • Next steps toward future airport areas transport planning
  • Going beyond future air travel crisis
  • What's emerging in cities and airport areas
  • Developing airport area mobility and business nodes

16:00

The airport – a playground for autonomous mobility

Hélène Bout
Innovation project manager
Groupe ADP
France
Improving access and mobility at an airport is a crucial issue. To meet these challenges, airports leverage a wide range of mobility solutions, including autonomous mobility. After successful first experiments, it is time to establish ambitious roadmaps for autonomous mobility at airport platforms to identify and prioritize the implementation of use cases, whether for the transport of goods or passengers, landside as well as airside, indoors and outdoors. This unprecedented work will help to structure airports' approach to autonomous mobility by offering the emergence of real services that are useful to passengers and airline customers.

What the audience will learn

  • Methodology to build an autonomous mobility roadmap
  • Diversity of autonomous mobility scenarios at an airport
  • Criteria for selecting priority services

16:30

Autonomous vehicles and systems at airports: guidelines and use cases

Dr Kirk Goodlet
Director, terminal operations
Winnipeg Airports Authority
Canada
Arturo Garcia-Alonso
Managing director
Airport Intelligence SL
Spain
This past November, ACI World released the publication 'Autonomous Vehicles and Systems at Airports - 2019'. This report, developed by a taskforce of airport experts from the ACI Facilitation and Services Standing Committee, is designed to increase the aviation community’s familiarity with autonomous machines and technologies. In this panel, several members of this taskforce will discuss some of the first attempts at integrating autonomous machines in airports and identify key opportunities and concerns related to this new technology.

What the audience will learn

  • Autonomous vehicles (AV), autonomous equipment, robots and other related systems
  • AV trends
  • Current applications using autonomous vehicles at airports
  • Why airports should consider autonomous vehicles
  • Case studies

17:00

New Mobility Services and the mobility hub of the future

Bruno Mario Lochbrunner
Mobility entrepreneur
SBB AG
Switzerland
The mobility of the future is on our doorstep and SBB AG want to contribute to shaping this future. This is why the New Mobility Services unit was launched in 2019 with the aim of rethinking and redefining mobility on the road, in the air and on water. This applies to the whole of Switzerland, as a model for the rest of the world. The mobility hub will be an important pivotal point in this future. SBB has taken on the task of further developing this hub and designing its mobility areas (for example parking areas).

What the audience will learn

  • Learn what SBB did to improve the travel journey, mobility and customer experience
  • How innovation and agile project management can work
  • Learn from a different mobility hub – the train station
  • Learn how digital transformation can work
  • Learn about special topics, including parking and customer information

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS Ceremony & Drinks Reception! Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Airport Design, Planning & Development

Day 1: Tuesday, June 9

Airport Design, Planning & Development
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Paolo Bianchi
Head of infrastructure strategy and planning
Bologna Airport
Italy
Mark Wolfe
Principal
Hassell
Australia

09:05

Smart airport for sustainable aviation

Augustin de Romanet
CEO
Groupe ADP
France
Edward Arkwright
Deputy CEO
Groupe ADP
France
Climate change mitigation, air quality improvement and biodiversity preservation are challenges at the forefront of civil society expectations. Given this context, expectations are high for aircraft manufacturers, airlines and airports, among others. Action appears to be a prerequisite to maintain the license-to-grow and even license-to-operate of the sector. In this context, airports can play a significant role toward more sustainable aviation, given their ability to provide solutions that will not only reduce their own impact – by decarbonizing their energy production, for instance – but also help all third parties to limit their impact (airlines, ground handlers, passengers and employees). To accelerate that journey toward sustainability, smart technologies are expected to play a significant role, for instance by facilitating intermodality, leveraging data to turn buildings and energy networks smart, or, in the long run, paving the way to a smart airport city.

What the audience will learn

  • Contribution of airports to climate change mitigation
  • Added value of smart airports to further increase the optimization of infrastructure and airport managers' sustainability
  • Smart technologies – enablers of an airport's sustainability

09:35

The future of O’Hare International Airport

Robert Hoxie
Chief development officer
City of Chicago Department of Aviation
USA
Dominic Grasacia
Project manager O'Hare Global Terminal
City of Chicago, Department of Aviation
USA
Having nearly completed a $10bn airfield realignment program including four new runways and two reconstructed and lengthened runways in the midst of the world’s busiest airfield, Chicago O’Hare is now focused on the $8.5bn Terminal Area Development Program (TAP). The TAP program will replace Terminal 2 and integrate existing Terminals 1 and 3 into a facility housing two major airline alliances. This presentation will focus the overall strategic direction for the airport, the current terminal works in progress, and the future terminal development plans.

What the audience will learn

  • The previous runway realignment and implementation and how the stage was set for the Terminal Area Development Program
  • The strategic direction for terminal development at O’Hare
  • The progress of terminal works to date
  • Overview of Phase 1 - Near-Term Terminal Development Program O’Hare Global Terminal and Satellites 1 & 2
  • Description of the Phase 2 Terminal Development Program

10:05

Transforming LAX

Bernardo Gogna
Chief development officer
Los Angeles World Airports
USA
LAX is in the midst of a US$14.3bn Capital Improvement Program, which includes the US$5.5bn Landside Access Modernization Program (LAMP). LAX is utilizing its footprint to modernize the airport, enhance guest experience and improve access. The LAMP will create new front doors to LAX, strengthen ties to the local communities and provide a streamlined connection to public transport. LAX is the fourth busiest airport in the world and the second busiest in the USA, so a program of this size poses unique challenges and is a hotbed of innovation in engineering, construction and delivery mechanisms.

What the audience will learn

  • The journey of LAX to becoming a world-class airport and first-class neighbor
  • The holistic approach of LAX to improving guest experience on all levels
  • The innovation needed to manage the unique challenges of overlapping multi-billion-dollar programs

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

London Gatwick's ongoing transformation

Cédric Laurier
Chief technical officer
Gatwick Airport
UK
Gatwick's ambitious capital investment plan and transformation continue apace. The airport is committed to exploring how to grow sustainably, while supporting the local and national economy, improving facilities and continuing to transform services for its passengers. The presentation will discuss the ongoing transformation of the airport and what the future holds for London's second-largest airport.

What the audience will learn

  • Gatwick's plans for the future
  • Understand Gatwick's innovative transformation process
  • Hear how the airport is making best use of its facilities

11:25

Auckland Airport Terminal Development Program – taking an agile approach

André Lovatt
General manager airport development and delivery
Auckland International Airport Limited
New Zealand
Graham Bolton
Global aviation practice leader
Mott MacDonald
UK
The Terminal Development Program forms a central part of a NZ$4bn+ capital program at Auckland International Airport. It includes a new international arrivals facility, landside redevelopment and a new domestic jet facility – supporting a near doubling of capacity and continued improvement in customer experience. This presentation will give an overview of the terminal development program, the different approaches being adopted to deliver the individual facilities, and the way that an agile-like approach has been used in prioritizing the capital solution and development of options.

What the audience will learn

  • Context of the current and future capital development program at Auckland International Airport
  • Application of an agile-like approach to airport planning and large-scale development and delivery
  • Alignment of capital delivery models with program and project requirements
  • Importance of airline customer, government agency and stakeholder collaboration in the airport development process

11:55 - 13:15

Lunch

13:15

Building a new terminal while in flight

Heather Leide
Director, airport development
Metropolitan Airports Commission
USA
Kerry Bruggemann
Principal shareholder
Michaud Cooley Erickson
USA
Minneapolis-St Paul International Airport (MSP) is designing a new terminal without relocating. With only a 15ft expansion and a new parking ramp, they are undergoing a US$1bn program renovation and expansion, reinventing the entire facility. During construction, MSP has hosted some of the largest events: the SuperBowl, Final Four and PGA Tournaments, utilizing both the design team and a large volunteer staff to make this project proceed efficiently. The MSP director of airport development and the Michaud Cooley Erickson MEP principal will present the unique collaboration that made this all happen, and will enlighten the audience with best practices learned.

What the audience will learn

  • MSP utilized staff, volunteers and consultants to integrate with passengers, creating the most welcoming and friendly experience during construction
  • MSP integrated many unique technologies including blast mitigation, hearing loops, HVAC upgrades and plumbing water savings to execute this project
  • During this program, MSP increased passenger flow and optimized vertical circulation to make the passenger experience seamless
  • The program created a synergy of services (restrooms, concessions, etc) consolidating and combining the baggage claim and ticket lobby
  • Increasing passenger numbers meant increases in parking – MSP built a state-of-the-art parking ramp to help improve the passenger experience

13:45

Closing Linate during the summer: positive outcomes of a relevant disruption

Armando Brunini
CEO
SEA Milan Airports
Italy
During most of 2019, SEA – Milan Airport’s management company – and its newly appointed top management had a single priority: accomplish extraordinary refurbishments at its city airport (Linate), implying the closure of the airport for three months, while minimizing the negative impact on airlines and passengers. The two main challenges were to finish works at Linate on time and in line with budget while hosting most of its traffic in Malpensa, the bigger airport in the system, during the peak summer period without negative consequences for the level of service. SEA adopted a holistic approach to this disruptive project, leveraging the engagement of its people, strong collaboration with key stakeholders, and clear communication with clients and passengers. A dashboard of project KPIs was put in place to monitor the project's progress and measure its outcome.

What the audience will learn

  • Main challenges and key success factors in managing an extraordinary infrastructural and operational event
  • How a highly disruptive event may be transformed into positive outcomes
  • Lessons learned by top management that may have a long-term impact on the airport company

14:15

Simultaneous development of 14 airports in Greece – challenges and successes

Ilias Maragakis
Chief operating officer
Fraport Greece
Greece
Rolf Klitscher
Project director Cluster B
Fraport Greece
Greece
In 2016 Fraport Greece was awarded the concession contract to develop and operate 14 airports in Greece. In addition to the challenge of setting up the entire company from scratch, the concession contract requires the design, application for construction permits, contract negotiations and the construction to be finalized for all 14 airports in parallel within 20 months for refurbishments and within 48 months for expansion and new construction. The challenges related to the parallel development of the landside, terminal and airside facilities will be shown within this presentation. The presentation will end with a short animation of the new façade in Mykonos.

What the audience will learn

  • Short overview of Fraport Greece and the concession agreement
  • Challenge of the simultaneous development of 14 airports – how the structure was set up
  • Challenges related to engineering capacity, logistics of material and staff
  • Success achieved with schedule, design and stakeholder satisfaction
  • The animation of the new façade in Mykonos will present the landmark within the airports of Greece

14:45

Orly Runway 3 reconstruction; an operational and technical challenge

Thierry Campin
General manager infrastructures
Groupe ADP
France
Michel Landelle
Senior manager airside operations, services and safety
Groupe ADP
France
Running operations on an airport with a single runway when you are used to having a total of three is definitely always a challenge! Orly Airport has experienced huge upgrading works on its runways throughout summer and autumn 2019. These included the demolition and reconstruction of the full pavement structure of the main runway and part of the cross runway, and structural reinforcement of a runway bridge over highway. The upgrade decision was made after several studies and discussions with all partners (airlines, civil aviation, local residents) to achieve a unique and outstanding operation. This presentation will cover the reconstruction project's process steps and strategy.

What the audience will learn

  • All the steps of the process and the challenging operational and environmental context
  • The strategy that led to the completion of this project within a critical timeframe of 18 weeks
  • How an innovative recycling pavement technique has limited the environmental impact

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30

Keeping the heart and soul of 'America’s Best Airport'

Vince Granato
Chief operating officer
Port of Portland
USA
Sharron van der Meulen
Partner
ZGF Architects
USA
How do you improve an airport so beloved that passengers write poems and songs about it? Hailed as 'America's Best Airport' seven years running, Portland International Airport is increasing capacity by 65% to accommodate 33 million passengers over the next two decades. A series of transformative projects will double the main terminal’s footprint and promise more fun, more food and more flow. Amid this growth, learn how PDX is planning to maintain its uniquely curated local character cherished by passengers and employees alike.

What the audience will learn

  • Understand what it means to design for a distinct regional identity via passenger journey mapping
  • Use of daylight, biophilia and sightlines as well as local amenities to create moments of comfort to reduce traveler stress
  • How to create an equitable passenger journey for all travelers
  • Integration of local, sustainable materials to create a sense of place while also reducing carbon footprint
  • Design, engineering and construction considerations to ensure PDX remains fully operational and passenger disruption is minimized

16:00

Sustainability@SYD

Chris Evans
Chief assets and infrastructure officer
Sydney Airport
Australia
Sustainability underpins Sydney Airport’s commitment to responsible growth in a changing world. As the global demand for travel grows, so does the focus on sustainable aviation and, increasingly, the role airports play in this transition. As critical infrastructure for our city, state and country, Sydney Airport recognizes sustainability as being key to our future. This presentation explores Sydney Airport’s approach to delivering stronger business and sustainability outcomes through planning and delivery of our built asset, to working with our airport partners in support of their sustainability goals, and to meeting and exceeding growing community expectations.

What the audience will learn

  • Creating commercial and sustainability 'win/wins'
  • How a focus on customer and community amenity drives business outcomes
  • Delivering environmental dividends through innovation

16:30

Small airport, big experience – airport transformation

Shane Munroe
Chief technical officer
MBJ Airports Limited
Jamaica
Small and large airports differ in passenger traffic but face similar challenges. Although airport size differs, passenger experience remains the same. This presentation discusses strategies to provide passengers with a 'big experience' even at smaller airports. Discussion points include the role of privatization in the transformation process; transformation strategies for airside, terminal and landside infrastructure; creating value for all stakeholders and the community; strategies to improve the passenger experience. Sangster International Airport, which was privatized in 2003, will be used as a case study.

What the audience will learn

  • The role of privatization in the transformation process
  • Transformation strategies for airside, terminal and landside infrastructure
  • The role of masterplanning and project planning in the transformation process
  • Creating value for all stakeholders and the community
  • Strategies to improve the passenger experience

17:00

Human spaces, people places – transforming Adelaide Airport

Kym Meys
Executive general manager planning and infrastructure
Adelaide Airport
Australia
Adriano Denni
Senior associate architect
Hassell
Australia
Adelaide Airport is consistently regarded as an exceptional benchmark for design, operation, and for the experience it creates for passengers and staff. People love visiting and moving through Adelaide Airport, but what are the ‘real’ reasons for this, and what might an evaluation of this airport teach us? This presentation delves into some key topics that explore why Adelaide Airport is a place people love, how this might influence business growth, and how the current transformation will build upon this.

What the audience will learn

  • Find out why people love using Adelaide Airport, and why this is important
  • Learn why Adelaide Airport is consistently put forward as a benchmark for terminal design and expansion development
  • Learn why Adelaide Airport continues to appeal to its many customers
  • Find out how the terminal expansion will transform this benchmark terminal and create better places for people
  • Hear about the challenges Adelaide Airport has faced during the development of the terminal expansion project, and the lessons learned

Opening Day Party – hosted by Groupe ADP – Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Day 2: Wednesday, June 10

Airport Design, Planning & Development
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Paolo Bianchi
Head of infrastructure strategy and planning
Bologna Airport
Italy
Mark Wolfe
Principal
Hassell
Australia

09:05

Developing Victoria’s gateway

Simon Gandy
Chief strategy and development officer
Australia Pacific Airports Corporation
Australia
From strategy to operation, this presentation will explain how we are shaping and delivering a future airport that Melbournians can be proud of.

What the audience will learn

  • Connecting strategy to delivery
  • Creating the experience Melbournians will be proud of
  • Maintaining our sustainable footprint
  • Centering the customers in what we do
  • Competing where we need to

09:35

Delivering the Manchester Airport T2 Transformation Project

James Lord
Engineering/delivery director
Manchester Airport Group (MAG)
UK
Julian Sheppard
UK aviation sector director
BuroHappold Engineering
UK
Manchester Airport Group is investing £1.2bn to transform Manchester Airport into a world-class operation with significant enhancements to current facilities and major improvements to customer experience. The transformation will see Terminal 2 more than double in size through a terminal extension, new airfield piers, baggage halls and a short-stay car park as well as airfield efficiencies to maximize the potential of Manchester’s two runways. The presentation will focus on how the combined client and consultant team steered the design while overcoming considerable program and operational constraints.

What the audience will learn

  • Stakeholder collaboration through design and construction phases to drive optimal benefits for the airport
  • Adapting the masterplan and the design to meet emerging and evolving airport and airline requirements
  • How the design process adopted computer scripting and automation to respond to evolving design requirements and achieve project timescales

10:05

Heathrow West – the alternative proposal for expansion at Heathrow

Graeme Power-Hosking
Design and delivery director
Heathrow West Ltd
UK
Maurice Rosario
Director
Scott Brownrigg
UK
The Heathrow West proposal provides for all expansion in one location with a significant reduction in land take, and environmental and community impacts. Working with airlines and operating partners, it provides an affordable solution that will create a new West terminal campus between a new Terminal 6 and existing Terminal 5 with an integrated transport interchange at its heart. The vibrant design is responsive to its context; it is flexible, sustainable and prioritizes hospitality, safety and security. A design informed at every step by the needs of all customers, it strives to provide hospitality standards that ensure passengers become our ‘guests’ of the future.

What the audience will learn

  • How design excellence can be driven through competition
  • About the nature and challenges of a competing DCO (development consent order)
  • Community and consumer engagement benefits in development and design
  • The challenges of meeting the ANPS
  • The potential for more than one operator for an airport

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

Developing for airport growth in a tourism-focused city

Chris Mills
Chief executive officer
Queensland Airports Limited
Australia
The presentation will explain how current masterplanning and development activity is transforming Gold Coast Airport to meet growth needs, optimize customer experience and deliver shareholder value. The Gold Coast is an area where tourism is the number one industry, and the airport provides an important first and last impression. A significant development program is underway to meet these needs. In 2018 the city hosted the Commonwealth Games, which delivered a number of key lessons.

What the audience will learn

  • How adjacent development sites are managed with different stakeholders
  • Airport capacity needs in a tourism-focused city
  • How retail strategies are developed to meet customer needs and optimize returns
  • Key lessons from hosting a major sporting event (the 2018 Commonwealth Games)

11:25

This is not (only) a passenger terminal

Michele Miedico
Head of planning, environment & compliance department
Naples International Airport
Italy
Federico Raja
Airports planning
Ge.S.A.C. SpA - Naples International Airport
Italy
Like the famous painting 'Ceci n’est pas une pipe' by René Magritte, we too may say that the new passenger terminal at Salerno Pontecagnano Airport is not only a passenger terminal: it is definitively something more! The new terminal is part of an innovative project that will bring a new dimension to the airport. The design of the terminal will apply innovative schemes, with a new sustainability vision. This means new investments, a new landscape, and a new cultural identity - in short: a new life.

What the audience will learn

  • A smart approach to airport masterplanning, considering minimum land acquisition
  • How to design a fashionable, cost-effective and environmentally friendly passenger terminal
  • How to give a new identity to a greenfield site

11:55 - 13:15

Lunch

13:15

Western Sydney Airport – a new gateway to Australia

Scott Ifield
GM airport planning and technology
Western Sydney Airport Company
Australia
Cristiano Ceccato
Director
Zaha Hadid Architects
UK
Western Sydney Airport (WSA) is a new greenfield airport in Badgerys Creek in the western district of Sydney. WSA is the only new airport to be constructed in Australia for over a generation and is the largest federal government project under development today. This presentation will showcase how WSA was developed from its inception through to the selection process for the master architect. The audience will learn about the airport's phased growth, and how the design for the terminal is built on sustainable planning principles and modular architecture to create an unmistakable new national gateway to Australia. ZHA and COX were appointed as master architect in late October 2019.

What the audience will learn

  • Airport planning
  • Passenger terminal design
  • Sustainable design
  • Phased development
  • Modular expansion

13:45

Solidarity Hub – shaping the future with innovative ideas and solutions

Franciszek Ryczer
Director of design and engineering, airport planning and development
Solidarity Transport Hub Poland
Poland
Przemysław Walędziak
Airport planning manager
Solidarity Transport Hub Poland
Poland
Solidarity Transport Hub is a greenfield airport project in the heart of Europe with ambition to become the main Central Eastern European transport hub, while becoming a state-of-the-art airport of the future. How to ensure that what is envisioned and planned today will be modern and incorporate future technologies when opened? How to prepare for technologies that are not yet dreamed of? In the form of a verbal duel, our speakers will present how to effectively plan and deliver a project while remaining extremely flexible and adaptive to changing trends.

What the audience will learn

  • What it means to be one of the top 10 airports in the world and what a next-generation airport is
  • Seeing the future? How to plan the future airport today
  • How to make decisions and deliver a project that is precise yet flexible
  • Are the uncertain technologies and processes of the future a risk or an opportunity and how to manage them
  • Shaping the future – is it science or witchcraft?

14:15

Building an airport that reflects your region

Paul Hoback
Chief development officer
Pittsburgh International Airport
USA
Pittsburgh International Airport has engaged a world-class design team to incorporate the region’s best assets (nature, technology, community) into the design and construction of a new US$1.1bn terminal and multi-modal complex set to open in 2023. The airport is collaborating with local vendors, small businesses, disadvantaged business enterprises, artists and stakeholders to create a facility that truly reflects and embodies the community. The airport has established program advisory groups and incorporated principles of universal design and operational readiness into all program phases to ensure that the new Pittsburgh International will be an unforgettable destination for 10 million annual travelers.

What the audience will learn

  • How mid-size, former hub airports like Pittsburgh International can modernize facilities to accommodate changes in the aviation industry and region
  • How the terminal design team was chosen and immersed into the Pittsburgh community before formal project design phases began
  • How the program management and design teams have engaged community stakeholders in the Terminal Modernization Program
  • Why holistic integration and collaboration among airport staff, consultants and the community is essential to any airport capital program
  • How designs based on local assets are essential to building support and creating a unique sense of place at airports

14:45

Ilan and Asaf Ramon International Airport

Amir Mann
Architect
Mann-Shinar Architects & Planners
Israel
Ramon International Airport is Israel's first civil airport built from scratch (greenfield), servicing the Red Sea resort city of Eilat and the surrounding region. Commissioned by the Israel Airport Authority, the project was handled from A to Z by the architects in their role as design managers, leading to significant achievements: completion within budget, significantly lower than similar projects in the world; on time with unusually tight schedules, leading over 45 consultant and planning teams; a completely new international airport, unified under one design – from masterplan to check-in counter, technologically cutting-edge, 'green' and environmentally friendly through creative site-specific solutions.

What the audience will learn

  • Challenges in planning Israel's first civil greenfield airport
  • The dual role of the architect as project manager
  • A complete greenfield airport on budget and on schedule
  • A futuristic desert mirage: one cohesive design language unifying an entire airport, from façade to check-in counter
  • What it means to build an airport in the middle of the desert, with no nearby infrastructure

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30

The evolution of agreements between airlines and airports

Katie Cooper
Head of transformation
Melbourne Airport
Australia
Melbourne Airport recently acquired the 40-year-old Terminal 1 (T1) from Qantas for AUD$276m. Qantas remains as the operator within this facility and the transition will take 18+ months. This presentation is about sharing how we are working collaboratively and in partnership with our major airline customer, while improving the passenger experience and achieving financial returns.

What the audience will learn

  • Airline and airport relationship criticality
  • How to transition responsibilities of terminal building functions while remaining operational
  • How to improve the passenger experience with your major customer
  • Improved efficiency of asset utilization for both airline and airport benefit
  • Investments require financial returns – how to ensure you achieve them collaboratively

16:00 - 16:45

Panel Discussion: Designing to world class – JFK International Airport

We are developing a masterplan for JFK International Airport’s redevelopment. This panel discussion will highlight what makes a world-class airport that goes beyond amenity, and how JFK’s masterplan celebrates the essential qualities of New York City to ensure a memorable passenger journey. Huntley Lawrence will discuss the Port Authority’s ambitions for the airport and how this was developed, Mott will discuss the Port Authority’s ambitions and its integral work on governance, and Grimshaw will offer a perspective on design excellence.

What the audience will learn

  • The specific tools and strategies used to develop best-in-class facilities and operations
  • How the study of nearby neighborhoods is shaping the framework
  • Specific design solutions that will provide unprecedented benefits to users
  • Challenges we faced and solutions
  • How multiple stakeholders on a large team can work together to deliver the highest-caliber results based on their individual expertise
Huntley Lawrence
Director, aviation department
Port Authority of New York & New Jersey
USA
Mark Husser
Partner
Grimshaw
USA
Panel Moderator:
Chris Chalk, global aviation sector leader, Mott MacDonald

16:45 - 17:30

Panel Discussion: Increasing capacity within an existing terminal

Today’s commercial service airports are experiencing unprecedented growth and passenger activity levels. Airport real estate comes at a premium cost, if it is available at all. At Los Angeles International Airport Terminal 1, Southwest Airlines has partnered with LAWA to modify and renovate their existing facilities to address increased passenger levels while providing an authentic LA experience – within the existing Terminal 1 footprint. This panel will share lessons learned from this multi-year project, with a focus on how impacts to ongoing operations and passenger experience were managed, while resolving facility capacity and passenger amenity needs.

What the audience will learn

  • How to deliver a positive customer experience throughout an active terminal modernization program
  • How to manage complex terminal renovation projects in an active environment
Stephen Sisneros
Managing director - airport affairs
Southwest Airlines
USA
Don Ostler
Program manager
Southwest Airlines
USA
Matthew Ross
Senior vice president
AvAirPros
USA
Panel Moderator:
Tim Hudson, prinicpal, Gensler

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS Ceremony & Drinks Reception! Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Day 3: Thursday, June 11

Airport Design, Planning & Development
09:00 - 13:25

Introduction by Conference Chair

Mark Wolfe
Principal
Hassell
Australia

09:05

BWI – Building with Innovation: the airport of tomorrow, starting today

Paul Shank
Chief engineer
MDOT MAA
USA
Chirantan Mukhopadhyay
Aviation principal
Jacobs
USA
Innovative customer service is the core of the motto ‘Easy Come Easy Go’ for Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall (BWI) Airport. Through planning, design and construction, BWI’s in-depth approach to today’s concerns provides pragmatic solutions for tomorrow and beyond. This paper demonstrates how a US$500m terminal expansion and a new baggage handling system (BHS) met airline operational needs, improved customer service and provided flexibility for aircraft mix. A creative design provided easily maintainable BHS, dramatically increased natural light for passenger comfort, and better concessions and restroom design. Lessons learned were incorporated through stakeholder participation and a new project.

What the audience will learn

  • How smaller terminal footprint design provides future flexibility of aircraft mix
  • Challenges of creating space for a new state-of-the-art BHS with expansion capability
  • How passenger experience is enhanced by natural light, concessions and restroom amenities
  • In-depth discussion of design challenges and solutions
  • How the design and construction teams uniquely collaborated to ensure successful project delivery on schedule and budget

09:35

The most important terminal planning trends – is your airport ready?

Sean Loughran
Long-range planning manager
Port of Portland
USA
Scott Tumolo
Director - terminal planning leader
C&S Companies
USA
Members of the ACI-NA Operations and Technical Affairs Committee – Planning and Development Working Group recently completed a terminal planning white paper titled Key Terminal Planning Considerations for the Next Decade. This session explores the most important terminal planning trends airport executives should be planning for as we approach the 2020s. It will clearly state these initiatives and explain their impact on airports generically. Then, the long-range planning manager from Portland International Airport will explain how his airport is planning for these initiatives, and showcase some of the projects his team is implementing to be prepared.

What the audience will learn

  • Key terminal planning considerations for the next 10 years
  • What airport executives should be thinking about before they implement their terminal development
  • A showcase of Portland International Airport's terminal development projects

10:05 - 11:05

Panel Discussion: A new working model: Heathrow’s integrated design team

Heathrow’s third runway expansion is the largest and most complex infrastructure planning application in UK history. Through an innovative approach, Heathrow assembled an integrated design team (IDT) comprising the best architects, engineers and designers with proven experience across infrastructure projects and global aviation hubs, as well as experience in complex and sensitive masterplanning. Find out how the IDT has developed its working model over the last three years to deliver exceptional designs for Heathrow, and how this collaborative model has consistently challenged the seven companies within it to strive for better solutions to highly complex design challenges.

What the audience will learn

  • Why Heathrow chose the integrated design team approach above other models of delivery
  • Find out how the ‘best athlete’ approach to tasks creates an atmosphere of healthy competition delivering highly effective outcomes
  • Discover how the IDT offers incredible expertise and great diversity of thinking
  • How IDT’s Early Career Professionals network is helping to fast-track careers and share lessons learned across Heathrow and its suppliers
  • How the IDT leadership team have evolved the model over the last three years
Barry Weekes
Head of design
Heathrow Airport
UK
David Beare
Divisional director of aviation
Mott MacDonald
UK
Steve Tasker
Market director of aviation
Atkins Global
UK
Toby Gibbs
Global environmental sciences service line leader
Wood plc
UK
Panel Moderators:
Jolyon Brewis, partner, Grimshaw
Jolyon Brewis, Partner, Grimshaw

11:05 - 11:25

Break

11:25

Planning when uncertainty is accelerating

Philippe Delaplace
Senior vice president
ADP Ingénierie
France
The new challenge is to plan flexibility. Planning is key for airports to better operate their infrastructure. But, in this ever-changing environment, how can they plan with enough precision while keeping enough flexibility to embrace upcoming and unplanned evolutions? Drawing on Groupe ADP’s experience as an operator and ADP Ingénierie’s international experience with airports all over the world, discover how to better plan and anticipate the upcoming changes and prepare for uncertainty.

What the audience will learn

  • Why changes are accelerating in the air transport industry
  • How change impacts the planning of airport development
  • How we can adapt our design approach to face this new challenge

11:55

Lean process improvement in airport construction

Jonathan Smith
Program director
Heathrow Airport
UK
Miguel Ricalde
Lean principal consultant
AECOM
UK
The supplier worked alongside the client to improve the excavation process for one airport expansion project. The process optimization project was delivered through a systematic implementation of Lean principles where the current process was fully understood, opportunities mapped and solutions developed. Through discrete scenario simulation and focusing on process flow and rhythm, potential savings of 19% time and 15% cost were demonstrated for the excavation process. The lessons from this project call us to break silos within the airport, to assess construction processes from a business perspective and reassess the flexibility of the operations stakeholders to better support necessary construction activities.

What the audience will learn

  • Importance of a holistic approach when determining the way to optimize the construction process that interphase with airport operations
  • Value creation from the inclusion of Lean practices in aviation construction projects
  • Respect, flexibility and transparency are key to deliver excellence

12:25 - 13:25

Panel Discussion: Utilizing the progressive design-build delivery method for complex aviation projects

The presentation will provide insight from two major airports experiencing rapid growth and expansion where the progressive design-build (PDB) project delivery method is being utilized. Industry experts will offer real-world examples of how the PDB contract method can be tailored to handle aggressive schedule requirements and/or contract flexibility from a cost and programming perspective. What are the advantages and challenges of this unique project delivery method? Lessons learned from the perspectives of the owner, architect, and builder will be revealed.

What the audience will learn

  • Why would an airport choose to use the progressive design-build project delivery method?
  • What are the unique traits of the progressive design-build contract?
  • Success stories that can only be delivered by progressive design-build
  • What the teams have learned from past PDB projects and how to build upon these lessons
  • The unique challenges faced by the owner, architect, and builder who enter into the progressive design-build arena
Traci Holton
Assistant vice president – development and engineering
Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority (BNA)
USA
John Aitken
Director of aviation
Mineta San Jose International Airport (SJC)
USA
Corey Ochsner
Associate principal
Fentress Architects
USA
Panel Moderator:
Scott Shelby, operations manager/project executive, Hensel Phelps

13:25 - 14:30

Lunch

Your conference questionnaire will be sent to you by email today. See you at Passenger Terminal CONFERENCE 2021!

Airport Design, Planning & Development – Middle East & Asia

Day 2: Wednesday, June 10

Airport Design, Planning & Development – Middle East & Asia
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Ashwini Thorat
Head Airport Planning
GVK
India
Jacques Khoriaty
Middle East & South Asia aviation director
Egis
United Arab Emirates

09:05

How to win a Chinese aviation competition

Max Connop
Global design principal
Aedas
Hong Kong
In 2018, an international airport competition was announced in Yantai, a key gateway business city in the eastern province of Shandong. Five teams comprising of both local and international consultants submitted designs. This presentation will explain the strategic approach the winning team took to develop their concept submission and how this approach provides a good framework for subsequent Chinese aviation projects. Challenging masterplan assumptions, concourse flexibility, stand optimization, risk-mitigated structure and culturally relevant design all contributed to the winning concept. Following the win, the team further enhanced the competition scheme focusing on the client’s key drivers.

What the audience will learn

  • How to identify the main client drivers on Chinese aviation competitions, and use them to strategize concept approaches
  • Understanding the Chinese aviation competition process, and applying this practical understanding to the positioning and optimizing of the submission
  • The benefits of smart engineering and planning, mitigating construction risk and actively future-proofing for flexibility
  • Balancing effective planning and efficient structure with culturally relevant concepts

09:35

Capacity requirements and operational efficiency

Ioannis Metsovitis
SVP operations
Hamad International Airport
Qatar
Airport expansion plans to support the growth in airline demand and accommodate the preparations for mega-events.

What the audience will learn

  • Growth and demand – future capacity requirements
  • Operational efficiency
  • Accommodating preparations for mega-events
  • Expansion plan challenge and approach
  • The solution

10:05

New development and innovation plans at Haneda Airport

Kyosuke Hirano
Manager, PR and Branding Strategy Office
Japan Airport Terminal Co Ltd
Japan
Haneda Airport's passenger terminals are being expanded and renovated to accommodate increasing demand. Slots at Haneda Airport will be increased by 39,000 just before the 2020 Games in next year's summer schedule. There are plans to introduce innovative new technologies such as fast travel and One ID. The presentation will discuss these topics and share some of the measures taken to prepare for the upcoming Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

What the audience will learn

  • How to accommodate big events such as the Olympics and Paralympics
  • Difficulties in implementing new technologies
  • How to improve security levels without affecting customer satisfaction

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

BLR 2030: reimagining India's fastest-growing gateway

Satyaki Raghunath
Chief strategy and development officer
Bangalore International Airport
India
The presentation will focus on the masterplan update for Kempegowda International Airport, Bengaluru (KIAB). This will include development strategies to meet demand through 90 mppa by 2030.

What the audience will learn

  • Investing in capacity at one of the fastest-growing airports in the world
  • How digital innovation and transformation are helping us
  • Airport city development
  • Economic growth and value addition

11:25

An airport for the people

Mohamed Yousif Al Binfalah
Chief executive officer
Bahrain Airport Company
Bahrain
Due to the ever-expanding aviation industry, the Kingdom of Bahrain’s Ministry of Transportation and Telecommunications alongside Bahrain Airport Company have immersed themselves in developing an encyclopedic project known as the Airport Modernization Program. The AMP aims at elevating Bahrain International Airport by means of updating the current infrastructure and services. Given the size of the project, it is expected that the airport’s capacity will increase to accommodate 14 million passengers annually. The project will capitalize and build on the Kingdom’s historical position, ultimately transforming it into a vibrant platform that invests in boosting efficiency and reinforcing the role it plays in Bahrain’s gateway to the world.

What the audience will learn

  • AMP main advancements and facilities and digitization at the new passenger terminal building
  • BAC business transformation model
  • New terminal building masterplan
  • Assets integration and stakeholder involvement
  • Operational readiness airport transfer (ORAT)

11:55 - 12:40

Panel Discussion: Airport capacity versus demand management

The panel will discuss the challenges of managing capacity in airspace, airside, landside and in terminal in order to cater for double-digit growth in the Middle East and Asia. The panelists will share their strategies and highlight the use of technology to squeeze more capacity into existing facilities. The topic of airports and sustainability will also be discussed.

What the audience will learn

  • Managing growth in an optimal and sustainable way
  • Balancing capacity across the airport
  • Future-proofing your business
  • Interventions for demand management
David Wilson
Chief operating officer
Oman Airports
Oman
Nicolas Schenk
Chief development officer for Delhi Noida International Airport
Flughafen Zürich AG
Switzerland
Panel Moderators:
Jacques Khoriaty, Middle East & South Asia aviation director, Egis
Ashwini Thorat, Head Airport Planning, GVK

12:40 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

Renaming of taxiways due to major airport expansion

Eileen Tan
Manager
Changi Airport Group (Singapore) Pte Ltd
Singapore
Changi Airport has embarked on a massive five-phase project to rename its taxiways as part of preparation works for Changi East and airport expansion, which includes a third runway. This is the first time that Changi has renamed its taxiways airport-wide since opening 38 years ago. The implementation is challenging as the change has to be carried out amid Changi's busy traffic. Intricate planning with relevant stakeholders has been necessary to minimize disruption to operations and for the changes to be carried out efficiently and safely.

What the audience will learn

  • Key considerations for developing and implementing a new taxiway naming scheme
  • Change management
  • Challenges faced during the implementation stage

14:15

Dubai Airports asset condition survey and investment cost modeling

Lal Mathew
Director, asset reliability and engineering performance
Dubai Airport
United Arab Emirates
Martin Vallance
Business consultancy specialist
Atkins
United Arab Emirates
Dubai Airport, operational since 1960, has a rich history of assets, augmented over many phases in the last 58 years to address capacity demands and modernization. With a capacity of 90 million+ today, Dubai Airport has a large asset base of mixed age and reliability profiles. Preparing for future investments based on well-informed inputs, ensuring optimum timing and maximum benefits, is critical to the continued success of the airport. Join the presentation to learn how a set of ‘asset investment planning decision support capabilities’ were developed to deliver on Dubai Airport's vision for the future.

What the audience will learn

  • How a cost model can help inform a strategic asset investment program
  • How to reduce asset failures and increase safety
  • Improved decision making for renewals and maintenance
  • Best practice and lessons learned from working collaboratively

14:45

Terminal 3 expansion plan at Narita Airport

Yusuke Kato
Senior manager
Narita International Airport Corporation
Japan
Terminal 3 is the dedicated LCC terminal at Narita Airport, which opened in 2015 with a capacity of 7.5 million passengers a year. Steady growth in LCC in Japan caused severe congestion in T3. We decided to expand the terminal to double the capacity and enhance the passenger experience. First, we segregated the departure and arrival flows by extending the terminal to have an arrival lobby. The access walkway from Terminal 2 will be replaced by a wider and safer corridor and the distance between these two terminals will be reduced. Passenger experience will be dramatically improved by introducing a hold baggage screening system, self-bag-drop equipment and smart security.

What the audience will learn

  • How to expand the existing terminal
  • Enhanced passenger experience at LCC terminal
  • Up-to-date information about Narita Airport

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30

New greenfield airports in Indonesia

Ramdan Pradarma
Vice president corporate planning and transformation
PT Angkasa Pura I
Indonesia
Indonesia is the world's biggest archipelago and has the world's fourth-biggest population. It has unique characteristics and environments for building and establishing air transportation: 17,000 islands make air and sea transportation highly desirable, which is why we currently have 268 airports, set to become 310 by 2024. The establishment of new greenfield airports faces many barriers such as regulation and density. Greenfield airports in Indonesia demonstrate art and stakeholder management to boost Indonesia's economy and tourism industry.

What the audience will learn

  • Understanding high-density country issues and how to approach them
  • Multiple-airport strategy and implementation
  • Stakeholder management and intergovernmental relationships
  • Land selection and acquisition

16:00

Clark Airport – a new gateway to the Philippines

Joshua M Bingcang
Senior vice president for conversion and development
Bases Conversion Development Authority (BCDA)
Philippines
Thanos Deriziotis
Project director
Egis
France
The presentation will introduce Clark Airport as a future gateway to the Philippines to serve the development of New Clark City. This project has been driven by the Philippines Bases Conversion Development Agency (BCDA) and is implemented under a hybrid PPP scheme made of an EPC contract on the one hand and an O&M service provider contract on the other. This iconic project is one of the most ambitious in the Philippines, and more generally in the dynamic ASEAN region. The airport will serve a brand-new metropolis, thus providing many opportunities for airport industry stakeholders.

What the audience will learn

  • Brief overview of the airport sector in the Philippines
  • An airport project to serve a brand-new metropolis: status and development of Clark Airport and city
  • Particularities of a hybrid PPP scheme splitting EPC and O&M (lessons learned, pros and cons)
  • Opportunities for the airport industry (manufacturers and service providers)

16:30

Shanghai South Satellite: the world’s largest and most complex concourse

Shanshan Li
Regional manager, corporate real estate, China
Delta Air Lines [via live uplink]
China
Jonathan Massey
Managing principal
Corgan
USA
The PVG South Satellite, which opened at Shanghai Pudong International Airport in September 2019, is the largest and most complex of its kind in the world. This 100-gate, 670,000 square meter concourse provides immense operational flexibility despite its complex passenger flow and segregation requirements. There were unique challenges, including the requirement for swing gates, the need for segregated domestic/international and arriving/departing passenger flows on a common APM platform, and a large number of gates required within an acceptable walking distance. The story will be presented by a key airline stakeholder and the project's design architect.

What the audience will learn

  • The operational complexity of a large concourse serving both long-haul and short-haul segregated traffic
  • Lessons learned on airline engagement during the design phase for a complex operational building
  • The importance of evaluating airline operational scenarios during the design phase, including operational support requirements
  • About dealing with complex design challenges in a new culture and different language
  • How to deal with complex designs issues in an emerging operational environment

17:00

State-of-the-art campus sets a new standard in airline operational excellence

Serap Okcu
Manager, airport investments and transfer planning
Turkish Airlines
Turkey
Joseph Gonzalez, FAIA
Global director of design
Ghafari Associates, LLC
USA
With the development of an all-new airport in Istanbul came the opportunity to plan and design a state-of-the-art operational campus for Turkish Airlines (THY) comprised of over 50 next-generation support facilities. The campus will total over 650,000m2 (7 million square feet) and set a new standard in airline operational excellence. Our design is not only highly functional, but imparts a unified visual identity that thoughtfully applies the airline’s revamped global brand. Attendees will learn how we incorporated innovative technology and sustainable materials to develop a cohesive design representative of THY’s ambitious growth, corporate rebranding efforts and overall vision.

What the audience will learn

  • How to apply key skills to design complex projects like the seven million square feet, 50-building campus for Turkish Airlines
  • Identify and define key elements that are crucial for successful global leadership: management, communication, local-office presence and construction management
  • How the use of technology was critical to building consensus among the disciplines involved in the implementation of the campus
  • Understand the methodology and approach behind our design in terms of branding, application of sustainable materials and use of technology

Skytrax WORLD AIRPORT AWARDS Ceremony & Drinks Reception! Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Aviation Security, Border Control & Facilitation

Day 1: Tuesday, June 9

Aviation Security, Border Control & Facilitation
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Philipp Kriegbaum
Retired senior aviation security expert
Philipp Kriegbaum
Germany
Art Kosatka
CEO
TranSecure
USA

09:05

What should we be worrying about in aviation security?

Jim Marriott
President
Marriott Consulting
Canada
Aviation security occupies an uncomfortable position at the nexus of private life, civil society, commerce, government, terrorism, the past and the future. Although remarkable progress has been made in the 50 years of contemporary aviation security history, there is and will be much more to do in the always dynamic risk environment. This presentation will provide an informative exploration of important – and sometimes overlooked – lessons learned and pitfalls to be avoided, a vision for what the future of aviation security is likely to hold, and key challenges that decision makers will have to solve.

What the audience will learn

  • The current and evolving aviation security risk context
  • Important lessons learned for the future of aviation security
  • Suggestions for getting ready for the future

09:35

Insider threat – our common responsibility

Tarald Johansen
Director safety, security, contingency and quality
Avinor
Norway
Due to global, European and Norwegian threat assessments, Avinor has done some work on insider threat. Based on the threat picture, we made an airport-specific assessment identifying the risk of insider threat at our airports. We have arranged workshops together with the police, the police secret service, national security agency and representatives from all 43 airports. Together, we have identified vulnerabilities and addressed measures to mitigate the risk.

What the audience will learn

  • What is insider threat?
  • Who is the insider?
  • Where could it happen?
  • How to mitigate the risk from insider threat?
  • How to secure passengers and employees from insider threat

10:05

Future challenges in aviation security

José Luis Nieto
Head of security
Aena
Spain
The presentation will reflect on the main challenges in the next few years related to security and the actions needed to improve airport security while maintaining the quality given to passengers. The presentation aims to answer these questions: How is it possible to improve the service and the procedures? What are the drivers?

What the audience will learn

  • Security requirements
  • Security management
  • Innovation in security: procedures and equipment
  • Security as a quality service

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

Counter-terrorism – protecting the busiest transportation facilities in the USA

Steven Rotolo
Chief of counter-terrorism
The Port Authority of NY & NJ Police Department
USA
Edward Cetnar
Superintendent of police/director of public safety
The Port Authority of NY & NJ Police Department
USA
The Port Authority Police Department is tasked with protecting some of the busiest transportation facilities in the world. The Port Authority is the only agency to have suffered four terrorist attacks in the USA: the 1975 TWA bombing at LaGuardia Airport, 1993 WTC Bombing, 9/11 WTC attack and the 2017 Bus Terminal suicide bombing attack. The Department has evolved into one of the world's best counter-terrorism police departments through training and first-of-its-kind technology.

What the audience will learn

  • How the Port Authority Police protect the hundreds of millions of people that traverse Port Authority Facilities annually.
  • Protecting the busiest international airport in the USA – JFK
  • Protecting three of the top five terrorist-targeted airports in the USA: JFK, LaGuardia and Newark Liberty International Airport

11:25

Protecting airports from drones

Jean-Philippe Percheron
Hologarde chief commercial officer
Groupe ADP
France
December 2018, Gatwick; May 2019, Frankfurt; September 2019, Aramco. Common point? You guessed it: drone impact on airport or sensitive infrastructure operations. The use of small drones has proliferated over recent years. This has led to a need for organizations to monitor and. where necessary, intervene in the entrance of drones in these airspaces. Since 2017, Groupe ADP has explored, tried solutions and decided to integrate along the way state-of-the-art sensors in an evolving artificial intelligence software, taking into account from the beginning the integration in its APOC. Come and hear the story of the journey that led to it.

What the audience will learn

  • Airport worldwide drones incident review
  • Graduate the risk from air navigation safety to global airport security
  • Counter-drone (C-UAS) solution: agnostic multi-sensor architecture in Paris
  • Discriminate and manage friendly drones from suspicious drones in the airport airspace

11:55 - 12:40

Panel Discussion: Drones and airports: counter-UAS

This panel will take a close look at the safety and security risks that UAS pose to airports, and will present attendees with a menu of mitigation options. Top aviation security and operations experts will examine current counter-UAS technology and legal hurdles through the lens of several recent case studies to provide a viable path forward for airport operators.

What the audience will learn

  • Update on recent incidents and emerging threats posed by UAS technology
  • Understand the key elements of a comprehensive UAS security and engagement plan
  • Brief overview of the state of the art of current counter-UAS technology
  • Analysis of the legal and regulatory hurdles and considerations when implementing a UAS security program
  • Summary of recent airport-based counter-UAS case studies
Holger Kraft
Vice president corporate security
Flughafen München GmbH
Germany
Patricia Hiatt
Deputy director of airport safety and standards
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
USA
Austin Gould
Assistant administrator of requirements and capabilities analysis
Transportation Security Administration
USA
Panel Moderator:
Justin Towles, senior policy advisor, Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP

12:40 - 13:45

Lunch

13:45

Cybersecurity – regulation is coming

Eric Vautier
CISO
Groupe ADP
France
Although it is first on the agenda of all airport directors, cybersecurity is still an unfamiliar topic. Who's in charge? What to do? In which order? At what cost? And who's paying? This talk will present how the air transport industry is tackling these issues: the regulators (European and national), the aircraft manufacturers, the operators (including the airports) and the supply chain. It will include some real-life examples to help you integrate cybersecurity into the business processes of an airport and become 'cybersecure by design'.

What the audience will learn

  • Cybersecurity
  • Regulation
  • Physical security

14:15

Behind the scenes – cyber-threat intelligence

Roee Laufer
Division head, cybersecurity
Israel Airports Authority
Israel
The civil aviation sector is an interconnected, global industry with many stakeholders. Cyber intelligence is a crucial building block in today's attempts to defend against cyber-related threats. The presentation will explore how intel is produced, screened and used in a mature cyber program.

What the audience will learn

  • Cyber threats in the aviation industry
  • What is cyber intelligence
  • The importance of intel analysis
  • How to use cyber intel
  • Case studies

14:45

Practical cybersecurity: the close sibling of digital transformation

Aura Moore
Chief information officer
Los Angeles World Airports
USA
David Kipp
VP technology services
Burns Engineering
USA
Like all airports, LAX is embarked on a wide-ranging digital and physical transformation, rebuilding and reinvigorating itself while continuing to serve nearly 90 million passengers every year. Data privacy and information security are at the heart of every project and on the mind of every airport executive. Los Angeles World Airports is at the forefront of cyber defense and is implementing a comprehensive program to deter and respond to cyber threats. This presentation will focus on identification of the myriad digital threats and how to combat/recover from attacks.

What the audience will learn

  • Understanding the fundamental threats and outcomes of cyberattacks
  • Removing jargon and language barriers to airport awareness
  • Key elements of cybermodernization
  • LAWA initiatives

15:15 - 15:30

Break

15:30

The importance of realistic security planning

Andy Peloquin
Director of security
Redrock Entertainment Services
USA
Your plans look good on paper, but are they functional? With today's threats increasing and changing, are we implementing proper security measures? This presentation will discuss what happened in Las Vegas during the mass active shooter situation, and at Mogadishu Airport in Somalia during the airplane bomb situation.

What the audience will learn

  • Planning versus reality – what really happens when things go wrong. Las Vegas mass shooting.
  • Concentric rings of security (to include behavioral analysis)
  • Increasing threats we face around world
  • The importance of communicating a plan

16:30

The benefits and limitations of behavioural detection

Andrew Palmer
Border security manager
Gatwick Airport
UK
The presentation discusses how the implementation of a behavioural detection program alongside enhanced security awareness can achieve a high level of security assurance. Recognizing the varying degrees of understanding and capabilities surrounding the process, this session will include an insight into the different approaches available, acknowledging both the benefits and limitations of such a program.

What the audience will learn

  • An explanation of the process itself and how it sits within an organization’s security culture
  • An understanding of what benefits can be gained from behavioral detection whilst recognizing the limitations
  • A myth-busting overview of a subject many consider to be an essential component of any security strategy

17:00

Human factors and security measurements – tools and methods

Signe Maria Ghelfi
Researcher
Zurich State Police
Switzerland
Quality control (QC) at security checkpoints (SC) is vital to ensure that the checkpoint and the security officers are ready for the threat. Covert tests are frequently used for QC. However, performance (i.e. detection, alarm resolution, team coordination) can vary substantially. This talk takes a deeper look at what causes differences in performance, and provides insights on cognitive (e.g. TIP, training) and behavioral aspects (e.g. handling uncertainty) that can potentially interfere with or increase security at the SC. The talk closes with best practices and recommendations on QC.

What the audience will learn

  • How can we make covert tests beneficial for security officers as well as for the airport authority?
  • Should training of security officers only focus on cognition (e.g. detection of threats) or also include behavioral aspects?
  • How does performance in covert tests correlate with computer training and TIP performance?
  • Security officers should be trained to handle uncertainty and unpredictability
  • Measuring the security level is not trivial: psychological insights and recommendations for security providers and airport authorities

Opening Day Party – hosted by Groupe ADP – Everyone is welcome! In the exhibition hall after the conference!

Day 2: Wednesday, June 10

Aviation Security, Border Control & Facilitation
09:00 - 17:30

Introduction by Conference Chairs

Dr Jean Salomon
Principal
European Association for Biometrics
France
Neville Hay
Director of training
Interportpolice
UK

Frontiers in border management security – in association with EAB - European Association for Biometrics

09:05

DHS Science and Technology Biometric and Identity Technology Center Research

Arun Vemury
Director, Biometric and Identity Technology Center
US Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate
USA
The DHS Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) Biometric and Identity Technology Center is S&T’s core biometric and identity RDT&E capability to drive enduring efficiencies and biometric innovations across DHS. The technology center’s research focuses on enhancing collection and matching capabilities; data security, privacy and integrity; next-generation identity documents and transactions; and identity linking and correlation.

What the audience will learn

  • Overview of the DHS S&T Biometric and Identity Technology Center
  • Learn about the technology center’s core research thrust areas
  • Identify path forward and opportunities for collaboration with industry and academia

09:35

Are interoperable biometric identities worth their impact on the borders?

Nicolas Goniak
Advisor - IT
Ministry of the Interior
France
In 2015-16 Europe endured a rise in terrorist attacks, some of which took advantage of multiple identities made possible by the diversity of immigration and security databases across Europe. Several regulations under the 'interoperability' banner have been devised since then, and now promise to fill the gaps. Borders will be stronger based on more reliable identities and more thorough checks. For that to happen, border crossing will move from a (simple) ID-and-document check to a whole ID registration. Authorization systems (ETIAS and visa) upstream and more automation in airports will reduce the tasks of the border guard. Will this be sufficient?

What the audience will learn

  • Immigration and security challenges the Schengen zone is facing
  • How far the seven new European regulations fill the gaps in the knowledge about the traveler's identity
  • The big change in the nature of border checks, and their operational impacts

10:05

Making EU border crossings seamless and secure

Pascal Janer
Vice president sales Europe
IN Groupe
France
The presentation will explain how to successfully meet the challenges of identification and biometrics for smooth EU border crossings in a post-Brexit environment, at one of the most important land and sea borders between France and the United Kingdom. Automatic border control e-gates with facial recognition were first implemented in the same way as in the airline industry. The second objective was to deploy the One ID concept applied to vehicles. This was possible thanks to multi-biometric kiosks, an identity management platform, but also to mobile devices to improve queue management and ensure a high level of security.

What the audience will learn

  • Biometrics, automation and facilitation
  • One ID and identity management platform
  • Entry/exit systems
  • Seamless passenger journey
  • Automatic border control with facial recognition

10:35 - 10:55

Break

10:55

The power of identity – leveraging biometric identity services

John Boyd
Assistant director, futures identity
USA Department of Homeland Security - Office of Biometric Identity Management
USA
The Office of Biometric Identity Management (OBIM) provides the US Department of Homeland Security and its mission partners with biometric identity services that enable national security and public safety decision making. This presentation will focus on the role of an enterprise-level service provider of biometric identity services, discussing current customers and multimodal capabilities, and looking at the Homeland Advanced Recognition Technology (HART) currently being developed: its role as a biometric identity services provider, support to the mission partners, leveraging current and future technology.

What the audience will learn

  • Overview of DHS biometric identity services
  • Developing the Homeland Advanced Recognition Technology (HART) Multimodal Biometric System
  • International information sharing
  • Privacy and public perception

11:25 - 11:55

Panel Discussion: Frontiers in biometrics: concerted border clearance challenges and achievements in air transportation

This panel will review the constraints of increasing border-crossing flows versus the challenges in performance, harmonization and respect for the privacy of biometrics as the main security-passing security credential. This will be in line with first observations from current large continent-level entry-exit programs. Our panel will review the importance of biometrics in streamlining border controls, while acknowledging that its rapid performance improvements do parallel a trend toward more sophisticated attacks against travelers' ID integrity. Delegates are welcome to participate in this collective challenge.

What the audience will learn

  • How is this hide-and-seek ID game going to evolve?
  • Will reality ever get close to an ideal world?
  • How sustainable are the present models/tokens (documents, processes, inter-agency/organization agreements)?
  • Do we have the right focus on the digital/technological push to achieve a harmonized blend of biometrics technologies in a generalized privacy-by-design ID scheme?
Arun Vemury
Director, Biometric and Identity Technology Center
US Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate
USA
Nicolas Goniak
Advisor - IT
Ministry of the Interior
France
John Boyd
Assistant director, futures identity
USA Department of Homeland Security - Office of Biometric Identity Management
USA
Pascal Janer
Vice president sales Europe
IN Groupe
France
Panel Moderator:
Jean Salomon, principal, European Association for Biometrics

11:55 - 13:15

Lunch

13:15

Using biometrics to improve efficiency and security

Thiago Meirelles Fernandes Pereira
General coordinator
Brazilian Ministry of Infrastructure
Brazil
Carlos Eduardo Gomes Souza
Coordinator
Brazilian Ministry of Infrastructure
Brazil
Each year the challenges of airport management become more relevant. In many cases, existing infrastructure cannot keep up with the increase in passenger volume. Thus, having good management of available resources is essential, as is the implementation of new technologies and processes to utilize the full potential of available infrastructure. The Brazilian government understands the importance of efficiency to address this issue. It is focused on improving passenger facilitation without compromising security, and is implementing end-to-end biometrics from check-in to boarding the aircraft, developing a large passenger identification and risk analysis system based on biographical and biometric traveler data.

What the audience will learn

  • How to implement biometrics from scratch
  • Increasing processes efficiency to address passenger growth
  • Creating a National Passenger Information Database
  • Security based on risk analysis
  • Improving the passenger experience

13:45

The effect of the introduction of the European Entry-Exit System at airports

Dr Kai Wendler
Senior team leader process and checkpoint management
Fraport AG
Germany
The challenge of EES is how to collect all relevant biometric and personal data of travelers. Border control checks at airports are particularly critical because any prolongation of the actual process might lead to longer waiting times for passengers, with unpleasant situations especially during peak times. The use of self-service kiosks at the airport is one solution; another option seems to be online (APP) and off-airport registrations. There is no perfect solution yet, but it is clear that all relevant stakeholders, authorities, airlines and airports have to find the optimum way to integrate and facilitate the Entry-Exit System.

What the audience will learn

  • Actual/new developments with EES
  • Possible solutions discussed
  • Challenges for airports and operators

14:15

How good is passenger-entered APIS data?

Simon Watkin
Senior official
Home Office
UK